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The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 ¾ Paperback – 31 Oct 2002

4.6 out of 5 stars 447 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; New Ed edition (31 Oct. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141315989
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141315980
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (447 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

One of literature's most endearing figures. Mole is an excellent guide for all of us (Observer )

Marvellous, touching and screamingly funny . . . set to become as much a cult book as The Catcher in the Rye (Jilly Cooper )

A satire of our times. Very funny indeed (Sunday Times ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Sue Townsend is one of Britain's favourite comic authors. Her hugely successful novels include eight Adrian Mole books, The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 55¾), Number Ten, Ghost Children, The Queen and I, Queen Camilla and The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year, all of which are highly-acclaimed bestsellers. Sue passed away in 2014 and is survived by her husband, four children, ten grandchildren and millions of avid readers.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As can be gleaned from the title, this is one of my favourite books ever.

It's laugh out loud funny, and I have done on many occasion to odd looks from my wife.

Adrian Mole was a teenage hero of mine and I read the book dozens of times in the 80's, it's so realistic and true to life and did represent some of the issues that I went through at that age. I could relate to it because I was roughly the same age and came from the same background as Adrian did. It rang a bell with me.

Now I look back on it with fondness and nostalgia and the good thing is my own kids have read it and claim it's on par with Harry Potter, great praise indeed.

Sue Townsend writing style is concise and free flowing and thought provoking, she has the good habit of being able to entertain in a funny while at the same time being to address serious issues to a teenager.

The new edition of the book is very attractive with nice gold lettering and printed on recycled paper, something of which I heartily approve of.

Next year is the thirtieth anniversary of this fabulous book and there is going to be a special commemorative volume to celebrate. I will be getting that but I'll keep this version of it for my twice yearly reading of the book as my original has all but disintegrated.

One of the classics of British literature and no bookshelf is complete without it. Fantastic.
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Format: Hardcover
I was 12 3/4 when I first read this book, soon after it was first published. I wondered what all the fuss was about as I didn't find it funny at all. That's because I was just as naive as Adrian Mole. A couple of years later I read it again and found it much funnier. Then, a couple of years later, funnier still. Adults growing up in the eighties will love this for the references (Falklands, Thatcher, Hitler diaries etc) but the teenage angst is timeless. My original is now much dog-eared, selotaped and, yes, loved. Buy the Growing Pains as well, it is equally as good. I must go now and update my Norwegian Leather Industry chart...
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By A Customer on 10 Mar. 2003
Format: Paperback
This novel is a very simple idea. 13 year old Adrian starts his diary on January 1st in the early 80's. He writes an entry every day for nearly two years. He reflects on his school, his unrequited love (Pandora Baithwaite), and his parents (including his hilariously awful feminist mother). Adrian decides that he is an "undiscovered intellectual" and tries desperately to improve his brain by reading as many books as he can. He usually misses the point in all the books he reads but is confident about his wrong assertions. Here lies the some of the humour - we see the world through Adrian's eyes and we can understand what is really going on between his mother and Mr "Creep" Lucus, and also the symbolism of the worthy books he reads like Animal Farm. But Adrian doesn't quite understand it all yet.
This book is also hugely touching. We always understand and feel for Adrian's emotional problems and the physical changes he goes through. Adrian is like any other teenager - he has spots and he reads pornography. This book is very effective at communicating the confusion that adolescence can often be. It's even more amazing when you consider that the author is a middle-aged woman. You feel so sorry for Adrian when his parents argue or when he is bullied, but the next laugh is always just round the corner. I first read this wonderful little novel when I was actually about 13 and three quarters old. At the time I thought it was an interesting and perceptive read but not in the least bit funny. I made the same mistakes Adrian did having not read Animal Farm or really lived yet. Rereading it a few years later I finally saw the humour and I realised it was actually hilarious.
Don't be put off by the 1980's setting of the book.
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1 Comment 37 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
I am a pupil in year 8 at school.

I have read the secret diary of Adrian Mole 13 3/4 and really enjoyed it.

It is a diary of a teenage boy named Adrian. It is painfully honest and packed with humour. He describes himself as a 'misunderstood intellectual' as he goes through the ups and downs of a tennage boy. This book is very funny and I would recommend it to a friend. It is suitable for young teenage readers who will thouroughly enjoy it. My rating is 3 1/2 stars because this book is very funny and good to read!
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As I haven't personally read this book, I must defer to my daughter, who is nearly 12 years old. This is what she had to say about it:-

"Adrian is a typical teenage boy and has many worries in his life, such as spots, girls, parents and what he should be when he grows up. A vet? A poet? At the moment he is trying to be a poet and sends many poems to a gentleman who works for the BBC, as well as to his girlfriend Pandora. His parents have recently split up, Adrian's mother having had an adulterous affair with the next-door-neighbour. Adrian now lives with his father, and is the only child. Devastated, Adrian has to survive with a dad who smokes a lot and stays in bed a lot because he is unemployed. He also has to come to terms with his dad having a girlfriend, who's very thin. On top of all this Adrian joins a club called the Good Samaritans and as a result has to look after an elderly man called Bert Baxter, cleaning his house and buying newspapers. He'd expected it to be interesting, listening to war stories and so on, but it turns out to be hard work. Overall Adrian's life is busy and stressful, and I wouldn't want to be in his shoes - he has to put up with Mr Baxter, he's forced to give his pocket money to a school bully, he has problems at home with his family, and he gets tonsilitus which leads him to hospital.

"I think this book is really good, it's funny from beginning to end and it made me smile a lot. Maybe I laughed a few times too, I can't remember. I felt sorry for Adrian but his diary is so funny and I would recommend it to my friends and anyone of my age."

This book is as suitable to children today as it was 30 years ago. It doesn't seem at all 'dated' and it's clear that my daughter enjoyed reading it.
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