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In Search of Genghis Khan Paperback – 26 May 1993

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Paperback, 26 May 1993
£26.81 £11.38
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Product details

  • Paperback: 141 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall & IBD; Reprinted edition edition (26 May 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0020819307
  • ISBN-13: 978-0020819301
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 14 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,127,516 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
tim severins account of his travels through mongolia provides a fascinating insight into the lives of the modern, or not so modern inhabitants of this country. intertwined with his travelogue tim weaves an account of the history of their great leader, ghengis khan, bringing these two periods of time together. as usual for this author it is a well written and researced book with his trademark dry humour. my only grumble is that the book could have continued on further than it does to provide a solid ending to the trip.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very good, cheap
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Format: Hardcover
Great condition
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Inspired book,
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Mix of Mongolian Travel and History 17 Jan. 2004
By doomsdayer520 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In this book Tim Severin is not really searching for Genghis Khan himself, as the title states, but for traces of the lifestyle and traditions in the modern world that have been inspired by the great leader. Severin traveled throughout the vast and sparse nation of Mongolia, mostly by horse and in the company of herdsmen who still lived the semi-nomadic lifestyle that had endured for centuries. Severin includes fascinating descriptions of the harsh Mongolian landscapes and good character sketches of his companions. An added bonus is coverage of the semi-autonomous Kazakh people of the western part of the country, along with interesting ruminations on the death throes of Communism that were developing at the time. Interspersed with the travelogue are an engaging history of the Mongolian people and a compendium of knowledge of Genghis Khan and his conquering exploits. On the bad side, Severin is not a very strong writer (or needs a better editor), and he is often unnecessarily judgmental. This is evident in cruel conclusions about a member of the expedition named Ariunbold, a bureaucrat whose poor leadership deserved criticism, but Severin gets personal. The final chapter should probably be ignored as Severin passes judgment on the character and intelligence of the Mongolian people and the effects of their vast history, giving rather condescending pontifications of another people's culture and history. Fortunately, interesting tales of the Mongolian people and their intriguing landscape and history keep this book mostly enjoyable. [~doomsdayer520~]
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a decent adventure story 6 Nov. 2007
By Matt Hill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tim Severin was invited to join a ride that would replicate the Mongol version of the Pony Express; two thirds of this book is about the ups and downs of that journey across the steppes of Mongolia. Severin talks about the recent and ancient history of the Mongols; visits a resurrected lamasery put together by monks that had been in hiding for over four decades; rides through the Hangay, the most scenic area of Mongolia; meets with Kazakh eagle hunters; visits an ancient shamaness; and goes on a shakedown horseback pilgrimage to Burkhan Khaldun, the holy mountain and birthplace of Genghis Khan.

On the downside of this narrative is Tim Severin's continual frustrations with the leader of this cross-country ride that ostensibly is being done to celebrate the glory of the 800th birthday of the Great Khan. His carping about the incompetencies of this guy, as valid as they may have been, end up being a real drag on the story of the adventure. The reading starts to get wearisome at the half way point, with the particulars and extraneous frictions between the personalities feeling like the author is dumping on the wondering reader. But, stick with it - the narrative picks up the last third of the book and Severin redeems himself.

Tim Severin's writing is definitely not of the caliber and gripping narration of "The Brendan Voyage" (see review). Yet, it still is a great story and presents much in the way of entertaining details. You may wish to read this book in conjunction with Jack Weatherford's book on Genghis Khan (see review).

The Cloud Reckoner

Extracts: A Field Guide for Iconoclasts
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this book 19 Jun. 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Learning of the Mongolian people was incredibly interesting, thought-provoking, and astounding. Severin writes very well of his experiences among these people and included many interesting tidbits regarding their history, culture, love of horses, landscape and psychology. An easy book to read, hard to put down, and now among my favorites.
3.0 out of 5 stars The book is interesting for its depiction of Mongolia - ... 29 Dec. 2014
By Mihai - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book is interesting for its depiction of Mongolia - historical roots and changes that started at beginning of the '90s. However I have found this book much less interesting than The Sindbad Voyage and The Brendan Voyage, which are really extraordinary books.
5.0 out of 5 stars great as usual 26 Aug. 2014
By Joshua J Lucca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Love he mix of history and commentary. Invaluable to historians that need to do more than re-read the same books. I wish more historians would get off their buts Nd into a saddle.
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