Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Scottish Book of Common Prayer Blue hardback, NS650 Hardcover – 25 Sep 1986

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, 25 Sep 1986
"Please retry"
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 812 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (25 Sept. 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521507057
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521507059
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.7 x 17.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,066,126 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

The Scottish Prayer Book is the prayer book of the Episcopal Church of Scotland, authorized by the Scottish bishops in 1929. This volume also contains the table of additions and variations permitted in 1962. This Prayer Book is published in a serviceable cloth binding, which will make it an affordable purchase for many Scottish churches. The pica typeface makes this a comfortable reading size.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Most informed traditionalist Anglicans (including some Scottish Episcopalians, some Protestant Episcopalians, and "Continuing Church" Anglicans among them) are aware that it is the Scottish Prayer Book (of the Scottish Episcopal Church), in its various manifestations and texts over the centuries, that has had as great an impact, or nearly so, as the Church of England's 1662 Book of Common Prayer upon the traditional Books of Common Prayer of the United States (1928) and of the Dominion of Canada (1959/1962). However, many Anglicans and Episcopalians may wonder just how the respective English and Scottish strains of Prayer Book development manifest themselves in their respective traditionalist (Cranmerian) Prayer Books. From having used all of the still-current (among traditionalist Anglicans, at least) Books of Common Prayer in public worship and/or in my private devotions, I hope that I can clarify these points in comparing salient aspects (without going into labourious detail) of the 1662 (England), 1928 (U.S.), 1929 (Scotland), and 1962 (Canada) Prayer Books. These comments largely derive from a review of a combined B.C.P./A.V. Bible publication that I have reviewed elsewhere.

Hopefully, customers in the U. S. of A., England, the Dominion of Canada, and perhaps even elsewhere may find that these comments encourage them to obtain a copy of the 1929 Scottish Prayer Book, whatever other B.C.P. variant they use for most purposes.

Although, of course, for public Anglican worship here in the Dominion of Canada, I would take along a copy of the Canadian 1959/1962 B.C.P. rather than the 1662 B.C.P., I tend normally to use the 1662 B.C.P. when I say devotions from the Prayer Book at home, primarily from a preference for the unaltered Coverdale Psalter of the 1662 B.C.P.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Would Seem That Anything Good That Traditional English Liturgy Can Do Well, Faithful Scottish Anglican Liturgy Can Do Better 7 Jun. 2014
By Gerald Parker - Published on Amazon.com
Most informed traditionalist Anglicans (including some Scottish Episcopalians, some Protestant Episcopalians, and "Continuing Church" Anglicans among them) are aware that it is the Scottish Prayer Book (of the Scottish Episcopal Church), in its various manifestations and texts over the centuries, that has had as great an impact, or nearly so, as the Church of England's 1662 Book of Common Prayer upon the traditional Books of Common Prayer of the United States (1928) and of the Dominion of Canada (1959/1962). However, many Anglicans and Episcopalians may wonder just how the respective English and Scottish strains of Prayer Book development manifest themselves in their respective traditionalist (Cranmerian) Prayer Books. From having used all of the still-current (among traditionalist Anglicans, at least) Books of Common Prayer in public worship and/or in my private devotions, I hope that I can clarify these points in comparing salient aspects (without going into labourious detail) of the 1662 (England), 1928 (U.S.), 1929 (Scotland), and 1962 (Canada) Prayer Books. These comments largely derive from a review of a combined B.C.P./A.V. Bible publication that I have reviewed elsewhere.

Hopefully, customers in the U. S. of A., England, the Dominion of Canada, and perhaps even elsewhere may find that these comments encourage them to obtain a copy of the 1929 Scottish Prayer Book, whatever other B.C.P. variant they use for most purposes.

Although, of course, for public Anglican worship here in the Dominion of Canada, I would take along a copy of the Canadian 1959/1962 B.C.P. rather than the 1662 B.C.P., I tend normally to use the 1662 B.C.P. when I say devotions from the Prayer Book at home, primarily from a preference for the unaltered Coverdale Psalter of the 1662 B.C.P. over the slightly divergent texts of the Coverdale Psalter as revised for the Protestant Episcopal Church's 1928 B.C.P. or the yet more frequent divergences from Coverdale found in the 1962 Anglican Church of Canada's B.C.P. To some extent, I also have begun to use The Scottish Book of Common Prayer, of 1929, which evidences a greater and more explicitly "catholic" spirit (including a greater degree of influence from Eastern Orthodoxy, too) and presents many advantages, practical and spiritual. One small example of an improvement in the 1929 Scottish B.C.P., relating to the Psalter, is the greater guidance that it provides in the use and choice of Psalms, in its "A Table of Proper Psalms, for Sundays and [some] Other Days throughout the Year". In fact, I have "tipped in" a copy of this table into my Canadian and English Prayer Books to help me out when negotiating use of their own Psalters.

There are other reasons, too, for going back and forth from the 1662, 1929 Scottish, and the North American B.C.P. editions, among them, for example, the inclusion of the service of Compline within the Scottish and Canadian editions of the B.C.P. (omitted from both the U.S. 1928 and English 1662 Prayer Books). There is, by the way, much difference of detail and breadth of expression, also in respective senses of devotional flux and flow, in evidence between the Scottish and Canadian services of Compline.

Moving on briefly to what is more significant, the U.S. 1928 text of Evening Prayer is shorter than the fuller forms of "Evensong" (as this service alternatively and lovingly also is named) in both the English 1662 and 1962 Canadian Prayer Books. The Protestant Episcopal Church's various editions of the B.C.P. over the years, somewhat less prominently, also had tinkered a bit with the text of Morning Prayer (Mattins), shortening it and making other alterations within it, as well. Despite the truncations, the 1928 American B.C.P.'s Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer services flow nicely and one does not sense, abruptly during worship, how either of them has been shortened at certain points.

As for, most importantly of all, the Holy Communion service (Eucharist), both the 1928 U.S. and 1959/1962 Canadian Prayer Books follow precedents set in early Scottish Episcopal Church B.C.P. practice (and found in the more distinctly Scottish rite of the two forms of the Communion service found in the 1912 and 1929 Scottish Prayer Books, i.e. in their own "Scottish Liturgy", the 1929 book including, as the Eucharistic alternative therein, the 1928 form from the proposed English B.C.P. which the British Parliament never officially authorised); the alternative to the "Scottish Liturgy" in the 1912 Scottish B.C.P. had been the 1662 Holy Communion service. The "Scottish Liturgy", the more so from an "Anglo-Catholic" standpoint, is superior, in its own and in the American and Canadian adaptations of its primary Eucharistic Liturgy, to what one finds in the 1662 B.C.P. There is an irksome aspect of the 1962 Canadian book's Holy Communion service, however, in that its makes some slight internal and regrettable omissions in penitential phraseology (such phrasing being retained, fortunately, in the 1928 U.S. and in the Scottish Prayer Books of 1912 and 1929 and being found complete and unaltered, of course, in the 1662 B.C.P.).

A serious difference, indeed, is the 1928 U.S. Prayer Book's exclusion of the Athanasian Creed (which is included alike in the 1662 English, the 1912 and 1929 Scottish, and the 1962 Canadian Prayer Books). The Lutheran and some Reformed/Presbyterian churches, and the international Anglican Communion, long have acknowledged the place and importance of the Athanasian Creed in asserting and maintaining Trinitarian orthodoxy.

The much improved "Forms of Prayer To Be Used at Sea" in the Canadian B.C.P. (only sketchily presented in the 1662 B.C.P. and omitted altogether from the American 1928 B.C.P. and from the 1929 Scottish B.C.P., although it had been retained in the 1912 Scottish B.C.P.) is a service that, at least normally, would not be said in parish churches, but which I frequently like to say at home, as an alternative to Compline, when the time is lacking to pray the service of Evening Prayer.

The texts within the readings in the Lectionaries in all four of these traditional Cranmerian Prayer Books diverge somewhat. The 1662 B.C.P. hews exactly to the A.V., whereas there are various slight degrees of divergence here or there from the A.V.'s own wording in the U.S. 1928 and (especially) in the Canadian 1962 variants of the Book of Common Prayer. The 1929 Scottish B.C.P., for its part, was unwise in permitting greater or lesser use of the Revised Version (of 1881-1894) along with the A.V. Bible. The selection of which passages of Holy Scripture to read at worship diverges to various degrees between the four books, but that matter (and all the more due to what one finds in the Scottish Prayer Book in the main part of its "Tables of Lessons", as they apply to the provisions for Sundays regarding lections for Mattins, i.e. Morning Prayer, and for Evensong) is too complex to delve into here.

On a practical note, I would urge potential purchasers of one of the Cambridge University Press' (C.U.P.'s) own choice of editions in its array of Scottish Prayer Book products (the same applying to reprints thereof), at least from those which the C.U.P. itself printed in the receding past, to avoid ordering the Scottish B.C.P. in the tinier formats that C.U.P. issued. This is not due to print size of the text, per se, for all of the C.U.P. editions which I have seen, of whatever physical size, are printed with admirable clarity, even in the smallest bold typeface among them, but rather because of page format. For example, the edition which I own of the Scottish B.C.P. bound with (as issued) "The English Hymnal" (the latter presenting only the words of the hymns, without any musical notation), measuring 5 x 3 inches (12 x 8 cm.) is printed in double columns on each page. Visually, this lessens slightly the impact upon the eyes of the intended lineation, indentions, and so forth of the B.C.P.'s text and rubrics (although they remain clearly identifiable), making the text to look rather less inviting to the reader's sight. On the other hand, the still handily pocket-sized C.U.P. Scottish B.C.P. (without any hymnal included with it), which I also possess, measures 6 x 4 inches (15 x 9 cm.) has the Scottish B.C.P.'s text in a single column across each

page, more lovely to behold and more flowingly obvious to follow. (I evened off to the nearest inch or centimetre the measurements, at the original bindings, that I have just indicated.) For the still relatively small difference in size, the 6" volume is printed in considerably larger letters (and other characters) than what appears in the 5" one.

The traditional B.C.P. as used in the various Provinces of the Anglican Communion, as well as in, of course, the Continuing Church movement, thus all have their own distinguishing characteristics in several regards, and it is enriching to use a variety of them, as minor as the differences among them, for the most part, admittedly are. For those further interested, by the way, in how its 1912 and 1929 editions of the Scottish Prayer Book compare, I have written a review of the electronic print-out edition of the 1912 Scottish Prayer Book published by Filiquarian Publishing (a.k.a. "F.Q. Books") which compares to some extent these two variants of the Scottish Prayer Book.

Although the 1929 Scottish B.C.P. is not ideal in its every aspect, anyone who claims that the Scottish Prayer Book is the best of these various national Books of Common Prayer has plenty of good reasons to justify such a preference.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback