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Scotland (World Mountain Ranges) by [Townsend, Chris]
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Scotland (World Mountain Ranges) Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Length: 560 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

About the Author

Award-winning author Chris Townsend was the first person to complete a continuous round of all the Scottish Munros and Tops. He has also walked across the Scottish mountains from coast to coast 14 times. Chris has served as President of the Mountaineering Council of Scotland.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 21107 KB
  • Print Length: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press; 1 edition (30 Mar. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007H605W8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #614,708 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
6 or 7 years ago I bought a new Cicerone title from Kev Reynolds, the first in a new series of World Mountain Range guides from Cicerone. This was (and is) a beautifully designed guide to the High Pyrenees. It was a book, book more of a breeze block than a walking guide. You wouldn't have wanted to carry this in your pack! The book was a resource tool, a great trip planning companion to see you through the long and dark nights of winter. The joy of this guide was that you had one book with which to select an area for the next trek. The guide covered routes, access, local facilities and amenities, local history and the geology, fauna and flora of the Pyrenees. This book gave you everything you needed to select your destination and leaving it a relatively simple task to consult other specialist guides to fill in the intimate details of the area that you'd settled on.

When I complimented Kev and Jonathan Williams of Cicerone on the guide they laughed. They told me that Chris Townsend had been commissioned to produce the second in the series, about the Highlands of Scotland. There were lots of jokes about this being a project that would keep him quiet for a long time! When I mentioned the project to Chris in a phone conversation there was a discernible groan coming down the line. I think Chris had realised what he'd let himself in for.

Fast forward to this earlier this year I was delighted when Jonathan proudly announced that he was in possession of the finished manuscript. The book was ready for layout and design. And now, the finished product has arrived!

I should say upfront that this is every bit as good -- and as useful -- as the Pyrenean guide. It is a work of which Chris should be rightfully proud.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an extensive guide to walking in Scotland. The book is not massive, but you would not want to take it up a mountain either. It is quite thick. 557 pages of walking and information on walking in Scotland.
All of Scotland is covered.
If you have an area you want to walk in, it is colour coded and paged.
If you have a hill or mountain you want to walk up or climb, look it up in the index, find the page, and read about it.
Chris details different ways of walking them, he also tells us the time taken and the total assent. There are also maps of many areas.
The book is broken down into sections.

Introduction.
Practicalities. When to go, weather, getting there, getting around, accommodation, maps and guidebooks, equipment for hill walkers.
The Mountains, Topography, history, names, national parks, activities, long distance, rock climbing, ski touring, avalanches, mountain rescue, access, wild camping, fires, sanitation, plant and wildlife.

Chapter 1, The Southern Uplands.
Chapter 2, The Southern Highlands.
3, The Central Highlands.
4, The Cairngorms.
5, The Western Highlands.
6, The Northern Highlands.
7, The Islands. Arran, Jurra, Mull, Rum, Skye, Harris,South Uist,
All have access, bases, maps and guides.

There is then an Appendix, which includes all the Monroes and Corbets.

So let's say I wanted to walk up Ben MacDui. I look it up in the index. There are several references, but pages 280 onwards look good, so off we go. Page 281, 4.9, the Ben MacDui and Cairngorm Plateau. we are told where it is. A little history lesson. Did you know it is the biggest area of sub arctic tundra like terrain in Scotland?
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Format: Paperback
Although the layout and arrangement of sections in this book take a little getting used to, it is a mine of information with plenty of useful detail - a reference work in fact. Definitely the book to dig into if you are going walking/backpacking/climbing/scrambling/cross country skiing in any area of the Scottish mountains. My only slight disappointment is the quality of the colour photos in which the printer has not done justice to the photographer's skill and beautiful choice of pictures.
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Format: Paperback
Must admit I was a bit disappointed. From other reviews I somehow believed the book would give route suggestions a la "The Munros", but that wasn't the case. Beautiful pictures and basic maps gave inspiration though. The text on suggested ridge walks could've been more comprehensive. Not a book for route planning, but for inspiration.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I first saw this I was really pleased. Obviously loads of research and compilation work has gone into this book and in that sense it's very impressive. So much diverse information in one place - and I will continue to use it as a reference point. However, I do have a few points to make - mostly about the author's style and approach.

Firstly - whilst I totally agree with the principles of environmental conservation e.g. pages 64-65 - I think there's far too much emphasis on avoiding the potentially damaging effects of 'wild camping' which is one of the most sensitive ways of staying in the mountains compared with (say) windfarm development, excessive use of cars (rather than public transport) and other environmental aspects like climate change and overgrazing (by deer and sheep). I think it would have been more helpful to focus more on the really critical environmental issues for the Scottish Mountains and what we can do about them to give them more balanced and careful consideration. Is it more helpful to lobby for restrictions on windfarm development rather than pick up fluff at wild campsites? On page 64 Chris writes about removing stone rings from overnight sites - presumably then he spends time removing the 'extensive low rock walls' on Sgurr nan Eag (page 503) constructed by Cuillin Ridge walkers! I think there's a bit of inconsistency there! Again on the topic of wild camping - there seems to be a current practice of stopping the car and putting up a tent next to a convenient layby or in a field. This isn't wild camping as defined and permitted by law and it has a lot more environmental consequences than true wild camping. It would be really good to encourage people to get away from campsites and roadsides and I don't really see this emphasised.
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