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Scotch Verdict: The Real-Life Story that Inspired "The Children's Hour" (NONE) by [Faderman, Lillian]
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Scotch Verdict: The Real-Life Story that Inspired "The Children's Hour" (NONE) Kindle Edition


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Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

Faderman continues her valuable excavations of the archaeology of erotic relationships between women.... [She] has succeeded in recreating an absorbing, often peculiarly moving courtroom drama.--Terry Castle "Signs "

The records are fascinating: they open up for us the worlds of the young female student and the schoolmistress, as well as the workings of the judicial system of early nineteenth-century Scotland. Beyond that, they make us privy to a unique glimpse of what lesbianism was considered to be at the time.... A brilliant find.--Karla Jay "Women's Review of Books "

Faderman, a noted U.S. feminist, recreates the trial superbly, using the original transcripts and her own detective work. She examines the trial from a feminist viewpoint, showing how it revealed the prevailing attitudes toward women in a phallocentric society. Her approach is valid and compelling, but her story is fascinating on many other levels as well.... Totally engrossing.--William French "Globe and Mail "

An absorbing transcript detailing the evolution of our understanding of the sexual relationships between women using the Scotch trial as the lynchpin. The story is mesmerizing while the writing is riveting.--Aron Row"San Francisco Book Review" (01/01/0001)

Faderman continues her valuable excavations of the archaeology of erotic relationships between women.... [She] has succeeded in recreating an absorbing, often peculiarly moving courtroom drama.

--Terry Castle "Signs "

The records are fascinating: they open up for us the worlds of the young female student and the schoolmistress, as well as the workings of the judicial system of early nineteenth-century Scotland. Beyond that, they make us privy to a unique glimpse of what lesbianism was considered to be at the time.... A brilliant find.

--Karla Jay "Women's Review of Books "

Faderman, a noted U.S. feminist, recreates the trial superbly, using the original transcripts and her own detective work. She examines the trial from a feminist viewpoint, showing how it revealed the prevailing attitudes toward women in a phallocentric society. Her approach is valid and compelling, but her story is fascinating on many other levels as well.... Totally engrossing.

--William French "Globe and Mail "

An absorbing transcript detailing the evolution of our understanding of the sexual relationships between women using the Scotch trial as the lynchpin. The story is mesmerizing while the writing is riveting.

--Aron Row"San Francisco Book Review" (01/01/0001)

Faderman continues her valuable excavations of the archaeology of erotic relationships between women.... [She] has succeeded in recreating an absorbing, often peculiarly moving courtroom drama.--Terry Castle "Signs "

The records are fascinating: they open up for us the worlds of the young female student and the schoolmistress, as well as the workings of the judicial system of early nineteenth-century Scotland. Beyond that, they make us privy to a unique glimpse of what lesbianism was considered to be at the time.... A brilliant find.--Karla Jay "Women's Review of Books "

Faderman, a noted U.S. feminist, recreates the trial superbly, using the original transcripts and her own detective work. She examines the trial from a feminist viewpoint, showing how it revealed the prevailing attitudes toward women in a phallocentric society. Her approach is valid and compelling, but her story is fascinating on many other levels as well.... Totally engrossing.--William French "Globe and Mail "

An absorbing transcript detailing the evolution of our understanding of the sexual relationships between women using the Scotch trial as the lynchpin. The story is mesmerizing while the writing is riveting.--Aron Row "San Francisco Book Review "

From the Back Cover

The year: 1810. The place: Edinburgh, Scotland. A student, Jane Cumming, accuses her school mistresses, Jane Pirie and Marianne Woods, of having an affair in the presence of their students. Dame Cumming Gordon, the wealthy and powerful grandmother of the accusing student, advises her friends to remove their daughters from the boarding school. Within days, the school is deserted and the two women deprived of their livelihood. Lillian Faderman, award-winning author of Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers, gives an extraordinary rendering of the real-life story on which Lillian Hellman based her famous play, The Children's Hour. Faderman reconstructs the libel suit filed by Pirie and Woods that eventually resulted in a scotch verdict - a verdict of not proven or an inconclusive decision. Through court transcripts, judges' notes, and her personal reflections on the witnesses' contradictory testimony and the prejudices of the men presiding over the case, Faderman skillfully documents the social, economic, and sexual pressures that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century women. Provocative and compelling, not only does Scotch Verdict point to the marginalization of women by raising issues of class, gender, and sexuality with respect to Pirie and Woods, but also of race in its depiction of Jane Cumming, the half-Indian child who was born in India and out of wedlock to Dame Cumming Gordon's eldest son.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1629 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (8 Jan. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00AND9E3S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,288,733 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Passion squelched 21 April 2013
By Guarina - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
How do social rules shape lives? Tbis is ultimately an account of women 's lives in suffocating economic and social conditions. Emotional existence is restricted and
hardly allowed to breathe. Touches on alienation of the foreign born (India) in the society of their colonizer, adolescent eroticism and of course complications of racism and restrictive Victorian culture. Compassion we feel for the girl accuser, her accomplice and even the stubborn grandmother facing a new society and lessened economic circumstances.

Main philosophical point, however, is that love between women, being a primary and existential definer of individuality, was extirpated EVEN FROM THEIR AWARENESS. I know of present instances of this suppression and self-censorship as well.
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting history 7 Feb. 2014
By bryceesq - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love Lillian faderman's other books. This one unfortunately tries to incorporate fiction into an interesting historical court case. The court documents are quite heavy, but riveting. Two women are suing for libel. They have been accused of having an affair in the early 1800s Scotland. The fiction is not really necessary, quite distracting, and a the fictional character is clearly racist. Not Faderman's best, but the content make it interesting enough to give it a read.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Did they, or Didn't they???? 2 Dec. 2013
By aron row - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Noted feminist, Lillian Faderman provides a spellbinding story as she recounts the famous trial from the 1800’s in which two school mistresses are accused by one of their students of displaying a sexual relationship with each other. In the libel suit that ensued, the result was a scotch verdict, meaning the charge was inconclusive or not proven. Reminiscent of Lillian Hellman’s “The Children’s Hour”, the evidence produced during this trial questions the veracity of the witness as well as the nature of the relationship between the two mistresses. The details of the trial read as a true detective tale as the author conjures up the personalities of the defendants, the accusers and the judiciary body. Bewildering to the male lawyers and judges of the case was the mystery of how an erotic relationship between women could exist. Not only is this a story of sexual mores but the book also points out the economic and class distinctions that restricted thought and growth. Most effectively, the reader is immersed into the culture and world-view of the male oriented society of the early 19th century. Female related sexual attraction from early history is cleverly contrasted with that of current 20th century lesbian relationships. This is an absorbing transcript detailing the evolution of our understanding of the sexual relationships between women using the Scotch trial as the lynchpin. The story is mesmerizing while the writing is riveting.
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the Pirie-Woods scandal 31 May 2013
By othoniaboys - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the most famous or infamous case of real or supposed lesbianism in Scottish history, and the fact that it inspired some woman to write a play means less than nothing. Faderman so heavily manipulates the trial transcript as to render this almost an historical novel.
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