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Saturn Returns: Astropolis, Book 1 Audio Download – Unabridged

3.3 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 11 hours and 12 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 8 Jan. 2008
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQ68IW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book was clearly meant to be exactly what it is and appears to be. Unlike the author of the first user review of this book I am very much interested in science fiction and I feel it deserves a little more credit.

This is a solid and entertaining sci-fi. It's like a good episode of a decent show or a film of the same genre. Aside from one or two inexcusably cheesy lines in the first couple of chapters I was thoroughly entertained throughout.

The light speed barrier hasn't been broken, so everything is on a huge time scale, there are different versions of the same people, there are hive minds, super human abilities, a vast decaying communications ring, fights, chases, interstellar journeys, a little sex, a lot of anger, big ships, little ships, dusty planets and even some gender re-assignment. We even get treated to a little realism in terms of the physics of space flight and orbital mechanics, to keep the uber geeks happy. What more do you need in a sci-fi?

If you're into this kind of thing, it's a good read. I'll be buying the next books in the series ("Cenotaxis" is on order).
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is my first read of a Sean Williams novel. It was recommended to me, way back in 2008, having been nominated for a Philip K Dick award in 2007. I've enjoyed reading it. Its what I would classify as hard science fiction, with little compromise for the casual reader: I certainly wouldn't be recommending it as a place to start for anyone beginning to take an interest in the genre. The ideas covered in the book are not particularly new but the expert writing takes those ideas to a level that other writers have often failed to achieve.

The book is let down a little by the storyline running through it. It just wasn't that interesting a tale. It was a bit slow in pace, in contrast to the vast timeline that is covered in the novel; in fact, the story almost seems at odds with the extraordinary universe that Sean Williams has created. Overall, this is a worthy nominee for the prestigious sci-fi Award. This is the first in a trilogy, and I will be reading the next in the series.
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Format: Paperback
Imre Bergamasc has been brought back to life from a storage drum containing his DNA and memories, and he has been remade as a women. That is just the beginning of his problems as as people start to see that he is alive again they want to kill him, properly. He is trying to remember what happened before he was almost killed last time.

This story is set on huge time scales, and across a vast galaxy. He seems to spend a lot of time just evading being killed again, and meets up with some characters from his past life. Whilst this is herd SF, and has all the appropriate factors for that, ships, derelict habitats, super advanced humans, and so on, the story line is not that strong, and i was not always sure quite what was going on and how he had got to that point. The other main characters in the book came across as complicated people with differing loyalties to Imre and other members of the story. I felt the ending was a little weak, as i was not sure how that guy fitted into the story.

Overall, I liked the writing, and the universe that he has created, but felt that plot let it down.
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Format: Paperback
The Slow Wave has hit the galaxy and has wrecked the Continuum in its wake. The Forts are no more and the line is in chaos as information travelling along it is trawled to find information on this disaster. What was once a united galaxy is now in turmoil as individual systems take control for themselves, resulting in more fighting for power.

When the Jinc find pieces of debris from a large artefact on the edge of the galaxy they painstakingly gather all of them together to reveal a drum, one with a back-up of Imre Bergamasc contained inside as data. After they re-create his body and mind using all this data, Imre awakens 150,000 years after his last memories, in a brand new body, unfortunately the wrong sex, and a patchy memory. Although the Jinc try and reassure him it could be due to the recreation of the drum, he has other thoughts and wants answers.

A former mercenary for the corps, Imre remembers his team and plans on finding them. After escaping the Jinc with the help of a mysterious object and the key phrase `luminous', he heads for the familiar: the Mandala Supersystem. On entering this system he sees first hand how the Slow Wave has affected the galaxy, no united front and a nagging feeling that he shouldn't just go straight to the first planet he comes across.

We follow Imre on a journey to reclaim his past life, to uncover the memories he is convinced are buried and to find out what exactly the Slow Wave is and who is behind it.

Firstly, I enjoyed Saturn Returns quite a lot. It's a widescreen space opera with elements of military sci-fi thrown in, which is almost always a good combination.
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