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Saturday Nights & Sunday Mornings

3.9 out of 5 stars 54 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Saturday Nights & Sunday Mornings
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  • Somewhere Under Wonderland
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  • Recovering The Satellites
Total price: £14.34
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Product details

  • Audio CD (24 Mar. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Polydor Group
  • ASIN: B000WM4UG6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 39,417 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

Product Description

COUNTING CROWS Saturday Nights & Sunday Mornings (Factory Sealed 2008 German 15-track CD album which is split into two distinct themes with the first encompassing the Saturday Nights part [produced by Gil Norton] presenting a descent into the darkness losing your sense of self through drink & medications; and Sunday Mornings [produced by Brian Deck] is about the realisation of the next day the hangover so to speak its not so much redemption as understanding why Saturday Night happens and whatnext?; includes the download-only singles Washington Square & You Cant Count On Me housed in a card gatefold picture sleeve with an extensive picture / lyric booklet)

BBC Review

Counting Crows' fifth studio album in 13 years will cause a big sigh of relief from fans around the world. Five years on from their last studio album, Hard Candy, and two from a live album of the tour that supported it, the band's delayed album of hellish and heavenly pleasures is finally released. Saturday Nights... was put back by the wise re-release of the deluxe edition of their classic - August And Everything After. This savvy move has reminded us why the band were so huge in the first place. But one listen to this album shows you, once again, how damned efficient they are at summoning up the spirit of an age that cared more about music than image.

The album is constructed in two halves. The first (Saturday Nights) being filled with the rocking, loud and debauched 'sinning' songs; the second (Sunday Morning) being the quiet acoustic atonement and redemption. It's an interesting idea that almost holds together.

The album rips right into 1492, with its tales of seedy Italian nightclubs. The band used to be compared to the freewheeling poetic rock soul of Van Morrison, but these days the touchstones seem to be early '70s Stones and late Beatles with even a hint of the latino-inflected soundscapes of the West Coast (especially Sundays). Cowboys, with its strident keyboards even has a hint of Springsteen. Adam Duritz's warbling voice makes you believe that he's drowning in a pit of self doubt and the band sound genuinely enlivened, with all three (yes, three) guitarists pulling out all the stops.

The second half is less consistent. While Washington Square and Anyone But You are filled, again, with those beautiful hints of lazy Californian vistas, too often the band rely on a standard chorus-repetition-until-it-seems-to-be-meaningful-approach. Duritz emotes angst and worry, but too often the predictable arrangements stymie the sense of resolution that this suite of songs is meant to imply.

In the end it's a concept that has obviously fired the band's creative spark again. We may not all relate to the self-destructive urge that pushes Duritz's muse to the edge, but as a straight-ahead rock album it's still got a lot to offer. To a UK audience, for whom even the mainstream includes the Arctic Monkeys and their ilk, this may seem a little too steeped in a '70s FM vibe, but on their own terms it's mostly a firm return to form. --Chris Jones

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
For starters, I think Counting Crows are one of the most underated bands of the last fifteen years. Their first two albums- 'August and everything after' and 'Recovering the Satellites'- are masterpieces. The sheer excellence of these first two records has made every following CC release struggle to live up to expectations. 'This Desert Life'(1999) and 'Hard Candy' (2002) are both great records. It's just that they are not as great as the first two.

So, 'Saturday Nights and Sunday Mornings' has a lot to live up to. This is especially the case given that it is their first new album in almost six years. Things start well with '1492' and 'Hanging Tree' both of which are from the rockier end of the CC spectrum. However, by the time you get to 'Los Angeles' a nagging thought starts to rear its ugly head- the Counting Crows have done all of this before. As Duritz sings the chorus of "If you see that movie star and me" you start to get the feeling you have heard it all before. Things pick up again however with the rather excellent 'Cowboys' before the second, quieter half of the album gets going...

... and that's where the feelings of deja vu starts to come in spades. At times it almost seems as though Duritz is just going through the motions. He is trying to sound forlorn for the sake of sounding forlorn. The passion and real heart wrenching angst, so prevalent on their first four albums, seems to have gone a bit stale. When Adam sings "Come back to me" on 'On a Tuesday in Amsterdam Long Ago' you cant help but feel it is an inferior re-write of the rather amazing 'Raining in Baltimore' from their debut record. It just sounds like he is going through the motions and not really feeling it.
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Format: Audio CD
Don't listen to the hype. For such a great band expectations are very high but regrettably this album is at best mediocre. I'm sad to say it but this is one of their least accomplished albums- where are the hooks and gemlike songcraft of yesteryear? It's not that the album is bad, it's just that it's simply unremarkable. I think the real acid test is to ask yourself- would any of these tracks get on to your personal 'Best of Counting Crows' playlist? I'm not sure I would add any to my favourites.

[My favourite CC tracks in no particular order: Round Here, Mrs Potter's Lullaby, Butterfly in Reverse, Amy Hit The Atmosphere, Miami, Omaha, A Long December, Hangin' Around, American Girls, Mr. Jones, Hard Candy, Rain King, Holiday In Spain, Raining In Baltimore, All My Friends, Black And Blue, A Murder Of One, Why Should You Come When I Call?]
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a much underrated album if I go by the reviews here. Talk of tracks that can be skipped and choruses repeating with verses seem ill advised and unfair criticism. The album starts loud and seemingly a bit angry but it mellows beautifully with Washington square. Some really wonderful songs including come around where again that feeling of togetherness despite it all is in evidence. You can't count on me is nicely written stamped with ever present doubt. I dream of Michelangelo is delicate and complex and leaves you wondering what it's about, as do the best songs. I think this is up there with anything they've ever done, and a pretty consistent offering.
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Format: Audio CD
This albums is full of highs and lows, 'cowboys' has all the makings of a crows classic, while 'los angeles' and 'you can't count on me' are personal favourites and rank very high in terms of all-time favourite counting crows songs, however for me the album does have a few dodgy tracks that need to be skipped which is a shame and somewhat taints this much anticipated release. Although these tracks are a shame there are mant decents tracks on this album and it is a definite must own for any CC fan and even casual CC listener, 8 out of 10.
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Format: Audio CD
So where do you start....first album for six years, one of the most underrated bands on the planet and one heck of a talented group.

Whatever this album was, it was going to be hard if not impossible to live up to everyones expectations given the 6 year wait.

SNSM is a welcome addition to the studio albums and sits nicely somewhere slap bang in the middle of Recovering the Satellites. To truly "GET" this album I think you need to understand its perspective, where its really coming from and its back story.

The first half of the album is very electric and starts with 1492 a leftover track from Hard Candy. That's not to say the song wasn't good enough to make Hard Candy it just didnt fit and it's been re-recorded and modified a fair bit if you listen closely enough. Los Angeles likewise and it actually sounds so much better now. All the tracks really do stand out especially Cowboys which I think is a Crows classic in the making.

The second half of the album is a huge departure from the first and much more acoustic and starts with Washington Square which again has the makings of a classic. The other songs are solid typical Crows tracks with "When I Dream of Michaelangelo" really standing out.

The album finishes with "On a Tuesday in Amsterdam Long Ago" which just feels so intensely personal and "Come Around" a much more up tempo rock/pop song which provides a really nice balance to finish off the album.

And there's the bonus track of "Baby I'm A Big Star Now" which was one of the bands demo songs back when the band were hunting a record deal.

So in truth its a good album, it probably won't hit you that it is at first time of listening, maybe even second time but trust me when I say it is.
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