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Sandman - Worlds End (Vol. 8) (New Edition) Paperback – 24 Feb 2012

4.8 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Paperback, 24 Feb 2012
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Product details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books; New edition edition (24 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857687034
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857687036
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 0.7 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 727,471 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"The greatest epic in the history of comic books." The Los Angeles Times Magazine
"Neil Gaiman is, simply put, a treasure house of story, and we are lucky to have him in any medium." Stephen King" --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Neil Gaiman is the most critically acclaimed comics writer of the 1990s and is the author of numerous books and graphic novels. He is the New York Times No. 1 best-selling author of American Gods and Anansi Boys, and won critical acclaim for his first feature film, Mirrormask, with long-time collaborator Dave McKean.


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is one of the "collection" graphic novels, where the comic equivalent of short stories are gathered. Interesting premise though...after the events outlined in The Kindly Ones are taking place, a reality storm occurs, while the new manifestation of Dream is taking control of The Dreaming. Various characters are trapped in the World's End, a refuge for people lost in the storm affecting many realities. The people inside spend their time telling stories, all of them touched by the Endless, even if they do not realise it at the time. The tales told vary from the disturbing tale where a man is trapped in the dream of a city, that loveable rogue Cluracan of Faerie causes a bit of mayhem, a seafaring tale involving Hob Gadling, Dream's immortal friend and my personal favourite, an eerie tale of the Necropolis Litharge, the city where death is celebrated; fitting , for after it we glimpse the funerary procession for Lord Morpheus... As ever, Gaiman doesn't just settle for grouping the stories loosely together, but the stories themselves are stories within stories, within stories, and all the while the knowledgeable Gaiman reader will catch hints and teasers from other Sandman stories. Not as emotionally satisfying as a "proper" Sandman story arc, but still, a superior collection of oddities which any avid fan will need to bridge The Kindly Ones and The Wake.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback
Imagine if the "Canterbury Tales" were told not by ordinary people on a pilgrimage, but magical beings in an otherworldly inn. That is the framing device for Neil Gaiman's eighth collection of Sandman comics, "World's End." Morpheus and the Endless have only small parts to play in this story, but it's enough to link together the assorted short stories -- and through it all, Gaiman conjures a sense of wonder and fear.

On a snowy night, a strange beast causes a car crash. Brant manages to carry his coworker Charlene to a nearby inn known as the World's End. It's probably a good thing that Brant seems slightly concussed, because inside are things he probably doesn't think are real -- gods, centaurs, faeries and other weird things that have also taken shelter.

To pass the time, they tell stories -- stories of slumbering cities; the Cluracan's clash with a vile psychopomp in a dying city; a cabin-boy glimpsing the strange mysteries of the sea; Prez Rickard, the greatest president in history; of the necropolis of Letharge; and of the mysteries that dwell inside and outside the inn...

One of Neil Gaiman's greatest skills is to make you see the terrifying, wondrous possibilities of fantasy -- of many worlds like apples on a tree, vast godlike entities walking through a starry sky, and forces so alien and powerful that it makes the spirit quake. Despite the Chauceresque setup of "World's End," these possibilities swim just under the surface.

So you don't see EVERYTHING in the World's End. It's all mirrors and smoke, shadows and flames -- and when you catch a glimpse, you KNOW that there's more to it. But you'll never be the same again.
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Format: Paperback
Ordered it on a saturday, arrived right on wednesday. I've read it before, but I wanted to have it in a physical support and lo and behold, it's even more beautiful "live". Amazing art with a great story. A definitive must buy not only for comics lovers but also for those who enjoy compelling storytelling coupled with above average art.
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Format: Paperback
Two travellers are driving across the United States, headed for Chicago. An unseasonable storm strands them at an inn, known as Worlds' End. Within waits a collection of fellow travellers from many worlds, all waiting for the storm to end. To pass the time they tell stories, stories from many worlds and many times.

Worlds' End is the eighth Sandman collection. It's a collection of self-contained short stories, but the stories feature recurring motifs. They are being told against the backdrop of a 'reality storm' that has been triggered by a cataclysmic event somewhere else in the multiverse (and, although a strong clue is given, we will not find out the nature of that event until the end of the following volume). It's Neil Gaiman's last chance to really exercise his imagination at short lengths before the beginning of the subsequent story arc, Sandman's largest and most epic, The Kindly Ones.

Worlds' End features a succession of stories, told by and featuring characters both new and familiar from the Sandman mythos. 'A Tale of Two Cities' is told in a minimalist art style, mostly through prose accompaniment, and features a traveller who loves his city so much that he becomes trapped in its dreams. It's weird and offbeat, and will probably appeal a lot to fans of China Mieville.

'Cluracan's Tale' features the return of the elf Cluracan, whose story is a bonkers collection of trickery, deception and a swordfight that may or may not have happened. It's lightweight (and Gaiman's not a huge fan of it, feeling it was too big for his page count and was consequently diminished in its impact) but fun.
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