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The Sandman: Dream Hunters Paperback – 22 Sep 2000

4.9 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Paperback, 22 Sep 2000
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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd; New edition edition (22 Sept. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840232048
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840232042
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 0.8 x 26 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 571,151 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Sandman fans should feel lucky that master fantasy writer Neil Gaiman discovered the mythical world of Japanese fables while researching his translation of Hayao Miyazaki's film Princess Mononoke. At the same time, while preparing for the Sandman 10th anniversary, he met Yoshitaka Amano, his artist for the 11th Sandman book. Amano is the famed designer of the Final Fantasy game series. The product of Gaiman's immersion in Japanese art, culture and history, Sandman: Dream Hunters is a classic Japanese tale that he has subtly morphed into his Sandman universe.

Like most fables, the story begins with a wager between two jealous animals, a fox and a badger: which of them can drive a young monk from his solitary temple? The winner will make the temple into a new fox or badger home. But as the fox adopts the form of a woman to woo the monk from his hermitage, she falls in love with him. Meanwhile, in far away Kyoto, the wealthy Master of Yin-Yang, the onmyoji, is plagued by his fears and seeks tranquillity in his command of sorcery. He learns of the monk and his inner peace; he dispatches demons to plague the monk in his dreams and eventually kill him to bring his peace to the onmyoji. The fox overhears the demons on their way to the monk and begins her struggle to save the man whom at first she so envied.

Gaiman's narrative rings with a sense of timelessness and magic that gently sustains this adult fairy tale. The only disappointment here is that the book is so brief. One could imagine this creative team being even better suited to a longer story of more epic proportions. On the final page of Dream Hunters, in fact, Amano suggest that he will collaborate further with Mr Gaiman in the future. Readers of Dream Hunters will hope that Amano's dream comes true. --Patrick O'Kelley


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In Dream Hunters Neil Gaiman retells a Japanese Legend about a monk and a fox in his own manner, tying it in with his Sandman series of graphic novels.

Dream Hunters fits in with the Sandman series in that it features the King Of Dreams, but really it's a book that's more free-standing than any ofthe graphic novels. It isn't in comic strip format, and although some of the Sandman characters appear the book is about two separate characters.

The book is told in prose, with every page of prose countered by an illustration by Yoshitaka Amano - and it's the illustrations that make this book so wonderful. Gaiman's story telling is good - in thisparticular book he takes on a formal storytelling voice, which works pretty well - but the illustration are beautiful. Even the cover is something I'd happily hang on my wall, but there's a picture that good on nearly every page - and some are even better.

Fans of the Sandman will probably enjoy seeing a different side of the King of Dreams, and a different writing style from Gaiman, but people completely unfamiliar with the series aren't left out at all. The book is a complete story in itself, and a very good one.
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Format: Paperback
The Dream Hunters is a Japanese folktale retold in Gaiman's usual dark style. Sandman fans will love this book which subtly references the Sandman themes while being more like his previous adult fairytale Stardust. However the book is stand alone and you don't need to have read any of Gaiman's previous work to fully appreciate it. The story is gentle & surreal with tones of violence as is the superb artwork by Amano. The synergy created by Gaiman's prose & Amano's art is mesmerising and the only real disappointment in the book is that, eventually, you will come to the end of it. I would recommend it to anyone.
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By A Customer on 30 Sept. 2000
Format: Paperback
This was a joy to read and a feast for the eyes. Gaiman as ever weaves a story that delights and suprises, and Amano has you falling into the world he creates with his sublime drawings.
Buy this book, read it, pass it on.
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Format: Paperback
Along with Alan Moore's Watchman and Frank Miller's Sin City, Neil Gaiman's The Sandman is one of the most popular, as well as the most critically acclaimed, comic book series of all time. With a distinct lack of burly men in tights and voluptuous women in neon spandex jumpsuits, The Sandman was in the vanguard of titles published in the late 1980s and early 1990s that sought to break away from the traditional conception of comics through darker, more relevant storylines and so to appeal to a wider, more sophisticated audience. The Sandman follows Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams, as he escapes into the modern world after spending seventy years in captivity. Having avenged himself on his captors, Morpheus sets about rebuilding his dream kingdom. As Neil Gaiman has summarised, "The Lord of Dreams realises that one must change or die, and makes his decision".

Having run for seventy-five issues, The Sandman concluded in 1996 and is now available from Vertigo Comics in a series of ten trade paperbacks or four fabulous re-coloured slip-cased hardback Absolute editions. In 1999 Neil Gaiman returned to the world of The Sandman with The Dream Hunters, a novella illustrated by Yoshitaka Amano that told the tale of a love affair between a Buddhist monk and a fox spirit. The Dream Hunters was tangential to The Sandman comic book series and only featured a small role for Morpheus. Although Gaiman had originally claimed that the fable at the centre of The Dream Hunters was taken from Y.T. Ozaki's Old Japanese Fairy Tales, it has since been revealed to be an original work of fiction. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of The Sandman, P.
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Format: Hardcover
The Dream Hunters is more than a boook, it is a thing of beauty. Neil Gaiman here show, once again, that the term author is insufficient, Just as mozart was more than a mere composer. In this reworking of a traditional Japanese fairy tale, as with his other work, Mr Gaiman once again demonstrates a link whith the tradition of story, the bards, fireside orators and dream-weavers who entertained with spoken tales long before the written word. The illustrations by Yoshitaka Amano are as spellbinding as the words, subtle yet powerful. As I said, this is a true thing of beauty, destined to take it's rightful place alongside my Sandman collection as a prized posession. Those who are familiar with Neil Gaiman's work will know what to expect and, as always, all expectations are surpassed. Those who have yet to discover Neil's work, where have you been and WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this because I love the art of Yoshitaka Amano. However, the story is captivating - a sort of modern fairy tale, well-written and emotive. This book tends to be classed as a 'graphic novel' but the style is nothing like a comic - it is simply a story with a lot of illustrations. Neil Gaiman is an established writer (he wrote the stories on which the hit films 'Stardust' and 'Coraline' were based) and this book was well received by critics. I'm not entirely sure what my expectations were for this, but they were certainly exceeded - I have now bought two more copies of the book to give to friends.
One word of warning, though. There is a 2010 reprint which is comic book style and is illustrated bt P.Craig Russell. With all due respect to his work, I don't feel the artwork compares with that of Amano in this edition (from 2007), and I prefer continous narrative to the comic style. Others may disagree, but it's important to check which version you are buying.
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