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Samurai Banner of Furin Kazan (Tuttle Classics) by [Inoue,Yasushi]
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Samurai Banner of Furin Kazan (Tuttle Classics) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 228 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

Yasushi Inoue (1907-1991), is widely recognized as one of Japan's greatest modern novelists and was honored as a "Living National Treasure." He was the recipient of every major prize in Japanese literature.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1397 KB
  • Print Length: 228 pages
  • Publisher: Tuttle Publishing; Tra edition (20 Dec. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007ECJEH2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #475,476 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Whilst the historical detail was interesting the storyand plot development was shallow and confused and consequently the book lapsed into being neither quality fiction or history. A lot in no-mans land really.
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Format: Paperback
This novel is mostly the story of an extraordinary warrior and general who lived in XVI century Japan. Yamamoto Kansuke (1501-1561) came to prominence late in his life, as he entered the service of the legendary Shingen Takeda only in 1543, as one of his advisors. He was very short (in some sources he is even called a dwarf) but with surprisingly strong and long hands and very large shoulders (in some sources he is even described as a hunchback). Because of an accident in childhood he became lame and also lost an eye - and it seems that his disfigured face was a rather unsettling sight... But this strangely shaped and damaged body contained the spirit of an excellent strategist. It is generaly considered, that Yamamoto Kansuke's advice greatly helped Shingen Takeda to rise from a petty local castle holder to the position of one of main players in the great fight for power other all Japan. His skills were however put to great test when the Takedas had to fight the Uesugi clan and its extremely able leader. The climax of this confrontation was the dramatic and tragic fourth battle of Kawanakajima, described in this book in great detail.

The second great figure of this book is Takeda Shingen himself, a fierce and terrifying warlord who fascinated generations of writers and filmmakers (Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" is the story of the Takeda clan and its leader). The relations between the lord and his master strategist are like a chess game between two brilliant minds and they make an excellent read.

But possibly the most extraordinary person in this book is a woman - but to avoid spoilers I will not say much about her.
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Format: Paperback
This novel is mostly the story of an extraordinary warrior and general who lived in XVI century Japan. Yamamoto Kansuke (1501-1561) came to prominence late in his life, as he entered the service of the legendary Shingen Takeda only in 1543, as one of his advisors. He was very short (in some sources he is even called a dwarf) but with surprisingly strong and long hands and very large shoulders (in some sources he is even described as a hunchback). Because of an accident in childhood he became lame and also lost an eye - and it seems that his disfigured face was a rather unsettling sight... But this strangely shaped and damaged body contained the spirit of an excellent strategist. It is generaly considered, that Yamamoto Kansuke's advice greatly helped Shingen Takeda to rise from a petty local castle holder to the position of one of main players in the great fight for power other all Japan. His skills were however put to the great test when the Takedas had to fight the Uesugi clan and its extremely able leader. The climax of this confrontation was the dramatic and tragic fourth battle of Kawanakajima, described in this book in great detail.

The second great figure of this book is Takeda Shingen himself, a fierce and terrifying warlord who fascinated generations of writers and filmmakers (Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" is the story of the Takeda clan and its leader). The relations between the lord and his master strategist are like a chess game between two brilliant minds and they make an excellent read.

But possibly the most extraordinary person in this book is a woman - but to avoid spoilers I will not say much about her.
Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed the book based on a real person[s] but it could have been toled as novel and not so much as a history lesson
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 17 reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars A poor translation of a great book 28 Mar. 2017
By Nick Kapur - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a rather poor translation of a beloved Japanese classic. The translator seems to have a less than complete grasp of spoken English, and thus the translation is consistently marred by unnatural phrasings, giving dialogue between characters in particular an extremely stilted feeling. The translation as a whole also has a very slapdash feeling, with abrupt and awkward transitions not found in the Japanese original, some passages out of order, and some passages inexplicably omitted. The end notes were also poorly edited, with grammatical mistakes, and otherwise not as helpful as the could have been because the translator seems to have a poor grasp of Japanese history.

All that said, this book is still an interesting and rather gripping read. The reasons why Japanese people love this story so much do manage to shine through this ham-handed translation, but all credit is due to the original author and not the translator.
5.0 out of 5 stars Love Japanese samurai stories that are based on actual people ... 5 Jun. 2017
By Paul E Clawson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very interesting read. Love Japanese samurai stories that are based on actual people and events. This book fits that requirement.
5.0 out of 5 stars and I was not disappointed. The Japanese characters on the battle banner 17 July 2016
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had read some about this era and "the 3 unifiers" Takeda Shingen, Iwagawa Yoshimoto and Hojo Ujiyasu. This was my first encounter with Yasushi Inoue's historical novels, and I was not disappointed. The Japanese characters on the battle banner, Furinkazan, meaning "Wind, Forest, Fire, Mountain", refer to passages of Sun Tzu's "The Art of War". Inoue ably fleshed out the events and characters in this gripping saga.
5.0 out of 5 stars Strategy or fight till the last one 22 Aug. 2014
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
what gave west the upper hand was the quantity of blood and not the strategy. To avoid the blood penalty western generals gave importance to new armament .That gave to west a superiority during 19 and 20 century. Unfortunately in our days west chooses the strategy as the main factor and not the blood of the wariors
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Boring & Juvenile 18 April 2013
By John - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Though many people seemed to like this book I personally found the writing to be rather childish and boring. I could not get invested in the characters and lost interest about a quarter of the way in. If possible, get a sample and check it out for yourself before buying.
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