• RRP: £21.99
  • You Save: £0.31 (1%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Sams+Teach+Yourself+C+++i... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 24 Hours (Sams Teach Yourself...in 24 Hours (Paperback)) Paperback – 14 Apr 2011

3.8 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£21.68
£11.20 £11.01
Promotion Message 10% Bulk Discount 1 Promotion(s)

Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£21.68 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save 10% on Books for Schools offered by Amazon.co.uk when you purchase 10 or more of the same book. Here's how (terms and conditions apply) Enter code SCHOOLS2016 at checkout. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 24 Hours (Sams Teach Yourself...in 24 Hours (Paperback))
  • +
  • Python in 24 Hours, Sams Teach Yourself (Sams Teach Yourself...in 24 Hours (Paperback))
Total price: £36.59
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Sams; 5 edition (14 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0672333317
  • ISBN-13: 978-0672333316
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 456,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Amazon Review

It's refreshing to find the occasional book on C++ which doesn't focus entirely on Microsoft's Visual C and instead looks at the wider picture.

Presented here for the reader's delectation are 24 "hour-long" lessons which concentrate on the features of C++ in general without getting bogged down in the intricacies of the MFC and other MS specific coding conventions which aren't always appropriate for the C programmer. So, what we have here is a helpful beginners book to what can be a complex subject which achieves it's goals with some style.

From the compulsory explanation of basic syntax and data types through to object-orientation, polymorphism and more this is a measured treatment of the subject at hand which is written in an engaging way making it a pleasure, rather than a chore, to read. The time estimate of one hour per lesson seems a little on the conservative side and especially latter chapters could benefit from rather more than 60 minutes of study, but this is a minor criticism at the end of the day.

In addition to the core elements, author Jesse Liberty shows how to get the examples up and running with DJGPP compiler (provided on CD-ROM with a bucketful of other useful utilities) or with Microsoft's Visual C++ package (they couldn't leave it out altogether!) Beginners could do a lot worse than look towards Teach Yourself C++ in 24 Hours, it's clean, clear and simple to understand. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

In just 24 lessons of one hour or less, you can learn the basics of programming with C++ ― one of the most popular and powerful programming languages ever created.

¿

Using a straightforward, step-by-step approach, this fast and friendly tutorial teaches you everything you need to know, from installing and using a compiler, to debugging the programs you’ve created, to what’s coming in C++0x, the next version of C++.

¿

Each lesson builds on what you’ve already learned, giving you a solid understanding of the basics of C++ programming concepts and techniques.
  • Step-by-step instructions carefully walk you through the most common C++ programming tasks
  • Quizzes and exercises at the end of each chapter help you test yourself to make sure you’re ready to go on
  • Starter kit software provides everything you need to create and compile C++ programs on any platform ― Windows, Mac or Linux

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Greatly written book, will probably take longer than 24hrs to read as it's a fairly difficult subject. You may need to reread certain bits over again, but if you have the time, read this book. I would recommend starting on the easier books (same publisher) like 'Sams Teach Yourself HTML' etc.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I would recommend this as one of the best books for learning C++.

The book goes step-by-step through the language, starting off at a very beginner level and getting gradually higher in complexity.
Everything from basic variables to advanced templates and inheritance is covered, and with good examples and explanations.

Beginners should be able to pick this book up, with practically no knowledge of C++, and be able to understand and learn the language. At the same time, the book provides a very efficient refresher for those who are slightly more experienced with C++.

I completely recommend this book as a starting point for anybody wishing to learn the C++ language and basic programming techniques.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
To anybody who is considering learning to program with C++ or has little knowledge of programming languages, I would steer clear of this book. This book should be for the C++ beginner, but the author's brief explanation on more advanced concepts creates a difficulty to keep focus.

THE GOOD

Although this Sam's book is awful for the beginner, it does have some decent aspects that cannot be left unmentioned.

For one, the many examples in the book are terrific - though a bit complex to first look at. They are repetitive through each hour chapter, though if you take the time to type them out and run your complier's debug then the concept on which the author is trying to explain does eventually sink in.

Secondly, the book comes with its own disc which has its own compiler on to use, along with all the examples and other utils, including WinZip. The complier is a must to have if you do not already own a program like Visual C++. In all honesty, you shouldn't require Visual C++ as a beginner.

Thirdly, the examples in the book are well laid out. Also, in the front of the book there is an index and pull out card with "Operator Precedence & Associativity" information. This comes in handy when trying to write your own programs.

THE BAD

This book would be so much better if the author took an extra bit of time in trying to explain the concepts on a more basic level. Instead, the use of examples does compensate the dire explanations to a degree, but they are not perfect.

Around hour chapters 13-14, the description of how C++ concepts work becomes vague. It is as if the author expects the reader to know the stuff already, or have a good knowledge of C.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 9 Feb. 2001
Format: Paperback
I cannot possibly recommend this book. The author tone is patronising in the extreme, the code examples are confusingly laid out, and the author seems uncertain as to the best order to introduce his topics.
Although each program is analysed in the main text it would be far clear to include comments in the code as to the purpose. In addition a reasonable number of examples start using syntax and notation that is not explained until several chapters later. Combine this with the shoddy typesetting of the examples - anyone whose has coding experience will dispair at absymal indentation that makes the programs exceptionally hard to read.
Maybe if you've never done any programming in any language then this might be an bearable introduction. If you've programmed before steer well clear and find a book that doesn't treat you like an idiot.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 18 Dec. 1997
Format: Paperback
Not if you don't have compiler experience! The book is well organized, the author well known for his teaching abilities. However, the BORLAND TURBO C++ LITE compiler does not work, and will not work because it was put together in 1990 by BORLAND who will not support it, and as a matter of fact (this took me one week) NO ONE supports it. Its just too old. This is not the authors fault. SAMS publishing can't help, they just threw in whatever they found on the shelf. The source code saves much typing, but I find that you need experience in typing in code to find your own personal problems with typing in code, and recognizing what a semi-colon does, and so on. Just copying files and running the compiler won't create a programmer. You need to create your own programs; this creates experience. This book is a beginning. There are many more books by Jesse Liberty that I like better. I'll have a drink and toast all programming authors the day they get their programming books together and put a cd in with a proper compiler, or recommend which one to get., and where to get it. SAMS PUBLISHING owes me one!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This review is based on the second edition. It came out a year after the new ANSI C++ standard came in, and states at the beginning of the book that the book had been completely updated to reflect the new standard. This is a lie - there is nothing at all that suggests that any of the new standard has been incorporated.

If you accept that this is a book that follows the old standard, it is still an awful book. User-defined functions are included in a program before main(), so that a function prototype can be avoided. Yet right at the beginning of the book the author suggests that you may need to include a function prototype for main, for certain compilers. I must admit that I have never heard of this. If this were the case, you should obviously avoid those compilers.

The book comes with a CD that includes the open source C++ compiler DJGPP. I tried this compiler once, but my downloaded version was very difficult to install. I now use Quincy 2005. This can be downloaded from the internet, and is extremely easy to install and use.

Besides the poor and outdated style of programming, the text that describes the programs is verbose, and contains much that is useless. A useless gem that I notice appears in hour 15 - Arrays. There is a section headed "Fence post errors" to illustrate that it is very easy to try and access past the end of array. Apparently this type of problem is commonly called a "ring fence error". Maybe it is in the USA, but it is probably unheard of in this country. This weirdly used and unclear language only helps to confuse the user.

Another such example appears much earlier in the book - "Wrapping around a signed integer" appears on page 36-37. This made me think of wrapper functions that you have in Java.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback