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Sailing - Philosophy For Everyone: Catching the Drift of Why We Sail Kindle Edition

3.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Length: 217 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

I highly recommend the wisdom filled and engaging book Sailing – Philosophy For Everyone: Catching the Drift of Why We Sail edited by Patrick Goold, to any students who study philosophy, students of any disciplines, practicing sailors, or anyone interested in the great and timeless questions posed by philosophy since the beginning of time. This book is one that you will return to for inspiration, wisdom, and solace again and again.   (Blog Business World, 2 February 2013) 

I highly recommend the wisdom filled and engaging book Sailing – Philosophy For Everyone: Catching the Drift of Why We Sailedited by Patrick Goold, to any students who study philosophy, students of any disciplines, practicing sailors, or anyone interested in the great and timeless questions posed by philosophy since the beginning of time. This book is one that you will return to for inspiration, wisdom, and solace again and again.   (MoneyTalks,
3 February 2013)

Edited by a professor of philosophy and with a (very good) foreword by yachting writer John Rousmaniere, this essay collection probes why we sail and what we can learn from it.   (Classic Boat,  1 October 2012)

"Sailing, moving from one place to another either for discovery or for economic survival reason must be the earliest mode of transport know to mankind that invloved technology i.e a boat and a sail."(Existential Analysis, January 2015)

From the Back Cover

This revealing collection of essays probes the philosophical mysteries of sailing, looking for the wisdom we can glean from this ancient craft. It digs more deeply into the meaning and value of the sport than do how–to books or travel/adventure accounts. Contributors include philosophers, academics from other disciplines, and others intimately involved in the sport. All share an abiding interest in sailing and the belief that it teaches profound life lessons to those who sail. They articulate the intense engagement people have with sailing craft and with the many different forms that sailing takes.

This book will enhance sailors′ appreciation, and enrich their experience, of the sport. At the same time, philosophers will discover thought–provoking examples of the way that philosophical reflection comes to life when it is applied to the concrete activities to which people commit themselves.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1605 KB
  • Print Length: 217 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (8 May 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008BW09XW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,024,234 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Some mildly interesting odds and ends but it feels like a compilation put together to fit in with the rest of the series.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 5 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The unexamined sail is not worth sailing. 1 Feb. 2013
By John E. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the many titles available in the Wiley-Blackwell Philosophy for Everyone series, Sailing: Philosophy for Everyone: Catching the Drift of Why We Sail offers philosophers real world application of philosophical principles and invites sailors to critically reflect on their sailing experience. If you are a philosopher and want to learn about sailing, you could do better by taking a sailing class or reading an instructional book. If you sail and either have a philosophical bent or want a little help reflecting on your sailing experiences, this is the best book I know of.

I am both an amateur philosopher, having taught Introduction to Philosophy as Adjunct Faculty based on my M.Div., and an amateur cruiser, having completed ASA 101, 103 and owning and sailing a C&C 24 on New York's Jamaica Bay. As a sailor and a philosopher, I loved most of this book.

The fifteen chapters, divided into four parts, are written by either philosophers who sail or sailors who have critically reflected on sailing. In Part 1, PASSING THROUGH PAIN AND FEAR IN THE PLACE OF PERPETUAL UNDULATION, Jack Stillwaggon considers the Certo ergo sum dimension of sailing. Gary Jobson provides a racer's point of view. Crista Lebens draws primarily on Aristotle's "eudaimonia" and phronesis to reflect on a typical day sailing. In my favorite chapter, Richard Hutch applies Rudolf Otto's idea of mysterium tremendum to ponder the spiritual dimension of sailing.

In Part 2, THE MEANING OF THE BOAT - THREE SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT, James Whitehill offers a reflection from a Zen point of view. Gregory and Tod Basham's chapter on The Stoic Sailor was my fourth favorite chapter. I highlighted more text in it than any other chapter except one. Steve Horrobin's "Sailors of the Third Kind" was my third favorite chapter and the one in which I highlighted the most text. In case there was any doubt, Horrobin convinced me that of the three types of sailors, I am the third kind.

In Part 3, BEAUTY AND OTHER AESTHETIC ASPECTS OF THE BEAUTY OF THE SAILING EXPERIENCE, Nicholas Hayes' reflection on the Race to Mackinac left me a little cold because I am not a racer. Steve Matthew's chapter on Sailing, Flow, and Fulfillment, however, invited me to reflect on the "flow" I sometimes experience sailing as well as sea kayaking, even though he writes from the perspective of a sail boarder. My second favorite was Chapter 10, "On the Crest of the Wave: The Sublime, Tempestuous, Graceful, and Existential Facets of Sailing." In it, Jesus Ilundain-Agurruza, Luisa Gagliardini Graca, and Jode Angel Jauregui-Olaiz helped me understand why, for me, navigare necesse est. Their chapter 10, along with Hutch's Chapter 4, would have justified my purchasing this collection of essays. In Chapter 11, Jesse Steinberg and Michael Stuckart consider what is "instrumentally valuable" and "intrinsically valuable" about sailing.

In Part 4, PHYSICS AND METAPHYSICS FOR THE PHILOSOPHICAL SAILOR, Sebastian Kuhn's chapter 12 considers the relativity of sailing. John D. Norton considers wind, apparent wind, and created wind in Chapter 13, a chapter that forced me to remember what I learned in high school about vectors, and in the Appendix contained more math than most would be comfortable with. In Chapter 14, Tamar M. Rudavsky and Nathaniel Rudavsky-Brody consider the gods, fate and the sea. Hilaire Belloc's Chapter 15 transforms a crossing of the English Channel into an archetype sail.

Because Sailing: Philosophy for Everyone: Catching the Drift of Why We Sail is a collection of essays rather than the work of one author, it can seem uneven. While for some, its choppiness can be a challenge, it can also provide some excitement. Sailors, from racers to cruisers, and sailboarders to blue water circumnavigators, will most likely find some wind for their sails in these pages and lead them to wonder if indeed the unexamined sail is not worth sailing.
4.0 out of 5 stars Appreciation from a lifelong sailor 20 Jan. 2013
By Adam Pressman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Which means I'm both more biased and more well-read. There are a lot of great books on this subject. For more of this kind of great read, keep searching and more importantly, keep sailing.

Live slow, Sail fast.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sailing - Philosophy For Everyone - Catching the Drift of Why We Sail 4 Nov. 2012
By Gayle H. Christensen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a very interesting collection of essays by a variety of Sailors. Emphasis is well-placed on the Why We Sail.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sailing 14 April 2013
By Steven Parkhurst - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Good read while waiting for the weather to break so that I can start the spring work on the boat. A bit dense at times but the chapter on Stoicism and the Chicago to Mackinw race are worth the book.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 16 Sept. 2015
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just perfect, thanks.
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