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SNOW! (SNOW TRILOGY Book 1) by [Clifford, Ryan]
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SNOW! (SNOW TRILOGY Book 1) Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 131 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1880 KB
  • Print Length: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Bill Eaton; 5 edition (15 Feb. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0079XO700
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 131 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #46,904 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Great premise, and the writing isnt half bad - nothing a good editor wouldn't sort out. My main problem is less easily solved: Mr Clifford seems to live in a world where only men are really protagonists and clear thinkers. Us women exist in a sort of twilight world of cooking, crying and following orders. By halfway through the book, not the snow but the sheer relentlessness of this wordview began to freeze my brain. A shame because he has talent even if he has no idea what the word «demur» actually means. But never mind my opinion as when the iceage comes my innate inability to extrapolate and plan will probably cause me to perish leaving the future free for rugged guys with shotguns and the royal family. So thats ok.
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I'm enjoying the story sort of anyway - it's a really good idea for a book - what would happen if the UK had an excessive, prolonged snowstorm - just how bad would it get and how fast? This book looks at how people wouldn't cope in the UK. But over-all I'm not enjoying the 'characters' in the book - they all seem very one dimensional and homogeneous. The personalities lack texture and depth to such an extent that they all seem to have very similar outlooks on life no matter what their age or background - and their feelings are shallow and simplistic at best. The other rather irritating aspect of the writing is the feeling that there is a lack of knowledge and research behind it. Very little meteorological understanding - it appears no body knew this massive snowstorm was coming even though it was on an unprecedented in scale and duration - rather unlikely. Most people seem to die immediately (and behave rather stupidly) but historically we have seen some very extreme weather and we do survive mostly (that's why there are so many of us). The military are ignored in this too - even though they have the training, manpower and equipment in real-life, this fact is ignored and they all apparently just stay in their barracks and do nothing?! The writing 'language' of this book is awkward and possibly old fashioned. It suits some of the more mature characters but there's no humour or life to any of the characters. Having said all this it's still worth a read and a good story. I'm hoping the next book 'Thaw' will show some development in writing style...
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let me say first that the book was well enough written I actually finished it. But honestly, the book was so silly it was more amusing that engrossing. The premise, as I understood it, sounded okay...parts of the UK cope badly with snow so write a novel showing how the UK would cope with the amount of snow other countries regularly deal with sounds really interesting.

But that's not what the author does, in this book the UK gets the mega storm of all time with Artic conditions from the second the first flake of snow falls. Then everyone who falls in the snow instantly hits their head in bizarre accidents and dies and anyone else dies of hypothermia within hours. Its so implausible that you loose any interest in the story never mind any of the characters, most of whom appear for a paragraph or two only to die.

I still think the premise is a good one but this book is so silly don't bother reading it, it will just annoy you. perfect example of why self publishing fails, an editor would have made the author rewrite until the story hung together and there was a coherent plot.
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This is, by far, the most badly-written book I have ever read. It is just bald narrative with no light or shade. The author lacks the expertise to build up character, tension, pathos or indeed any form of emotion. The writing is basic, simplistic and amateurish.
The premise is great and believable, with Great Britain overwhelmed by a freak and extended period of heavy and continuous snow. It is a series of episodes, many of which are quite ingenious. But the author fails to make the most of them through lack of writing technique. In the hands of a competent author this could have been a bestseller.
One episode is farcical. A commuter is trapped on an otherwise empty train which is abandoned in a depot. How was he allowed to board the train at Slough, and indeed stay on it? Why is it a corridor train in the mobile phone age? Why are there no emergency exits and no little hammer supplied to break certain windows? Why, when he is in a life and death situation, does he eventually and suddenly remember he has a mobile phone? Surely this would be the first resort a modern person would think of?
The author writes as if he is telling the story out loud. Grammar is often clumsy and there seems to be complete ignorance of apostrophe rules. Characters are "hold up" instead of "holed up" (although this could be the fault of the Kindle transcription). People are "raring to go" instead of "rearing to go". There is much peeking instead of peeping. Exclamation marks are overused.
But I stayed with it to the end. Why? The author has some technical knowledge. He also has a good geographical knowledge of the Nottingham-Lincolnshire area, which is not far from where I live, which added some interest for me.
There is a good book in there somewhere. It should have been taken in hand long before publication.
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