SKATERS

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Biography

It’s part of New York City’s bargain with the world: It remains the greatest city on the planet as long as every few years, it births a band that revamps the musical landscape. From Talking Heads to Ramones, The Strokes to Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem to fun., the grand tradition has carried on for decades.

Which group is poised to lead the charge next? We vote for SKATERS, whose explosive debut
7-inch, "I Wanna Dance (But I Don't Know How),” will be released on vinyl by Warner Bros. Records this April 9th. Not only is the band bursting with Manhattan pride, but they’ve also scored ... Read more

It’s part of New York City’s bargain with the world: It remains the greatest city on the planet as long as every few years, it births a band that revamps the musical landscape. From Talking Heads to Ramones, The Strokes to Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem to fun., the grand tradition has carried on for decades.

Which group is poised to lead the charge next? We vote for SKATERS, whose explosive debut
7-inch, "I Wanna Dance (But I Don't Know How),” will be released on vinyl by Warner Bros. Records this April 9th. Not only is the band bursting with Manhattan pride, but they’ve also scored early love from the British music press, thanks to their street-smart style and tough, witty, gear-stripping shake appeal. “I think London and New York are often on the same page, musically,” says singer Michael Ian Cummings, which explains why those on other side of the pond have so lovingly embraced the band.

Though, like the best New Yorkers, the trio is in the city by choice. Cummings and drummer Noah Rubin were teenage friends who bonded over Pavement records and played together in punk bands in the Boston suburbs. However, the friends headed west before connecting with British guitarist Joshua Hubbard via a chance encounter. “It was very weird,” Cummings says of his first meeting of Hubbard at a Los Angeles house party. ”We stayed up all night doing debauched things and had one of those classic ‘Let’s start a band’ conversations.”

Once SKATERS began rolling, it was clear something was amiss. At heart, they had nothing in common with the local scene and knew they weren’t an L.A. band. “I just had to get back to New York because this music could only evolve from our East Coast sensibilities,” says Cummings. Soon, the three moved to NYC, which sparked a newfound sense of purpose and determination. “Josh said, ‘I don’t want to jam. I came here to start a fucking band. Let’s play shows.’ I said, ‘We don’t have any songs.’ He said, ‘It doesn’t matter!’ [And] the next day we booked three shows.”

The trio struggled, handing out flyers, sleeping on couches, bartending and DJ’ing. (“It was very hand-to-mouth,” Cummings says.) All the while, they were feeding off NYC’s uniquely sharp and speedy musical undercurrent. “Every song we write is about experiences we’ve had here, and the energy of the music is New York-influenced,” Cummings says. In early 2012, SKATERS released a DIY 5-song EP that the band gave away for free on their website, resulting in over 10,000 downloads, attention from the indie rock press and sold-out shows at Webster Hall Studio and the Mercury Lounge. Major-label interest followed and the band eventually signed with Warner Bros. Records in late 2012.

SKATERS are currently recording their debut album at the legendary Electric Lady Studios―built by Jimi Hendrix and host to such iconic New York rock albums as Patti Smith’s debut, Horses―with veteran producer John Hill (Santigold, M.I.A., Wavves). “Hill has an expansive sonic vocabulary,” explains Cummings. “We didn’t want to make another standard rock record, but an album of songs that reflected all the things about music that we love.”

The band will debut their new material this summer on the European and U.S. festival circui, alongside nonstop club dates. So what does the band consider the ideal exchange for being the new leaders of New York City’s local scene? “I just want this record to be able to be played in all environments,” Cummings says. “If people were getting together for a party and you threw this record on, and everyone started to dance, I’d feel like I did my part.”

“I Wanna Dance (But I Don’t Know How)” B/W ”Armed” on real 7” round, 45 rpm vinyl single out April 9, 2013 and meant to be played on a “Record Player” real loud.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

It’s part of New York City’s bargain with the world: It remains the greatest city on the planet as long as every few years, it births a band that revamps the musical landscape. From Talking Heads to Ramones, The Strokes to Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem to fun., the grand tradition has carried on for decades.

Which group is poised to lead the charge next? We vote for SKATERS, whose explosive debut
7-inch, "I Wanna Dance (But I Don't Know How),” will be released on vinyl by Warner Bros. Records this April 9th. Not only is the band bursting with Manhattan pride, but they’ve also scored early love from the British music press, thanks to their street-smart style and tough, witty, gear-stripping shake appeal. “I think London and New York are often on the same page, musically,” says singer Michael Ian Cummings, which explains why those on other side of the pond have so lovingly embraced the band.

Though, like the best New Yorkers, the trio is in the city by choice. Cummings and drummer Noah Rubin were teenage friends who bonded over Pavement records and played together in punk bands in the Boston suburbs. However, the friends headed west before connecting with British guitarist Joshua Hubbard via a chance encounter. “It was very weird,” Cummings says of his first meeting of Hubbard at a Los Angeles house party. ”We stayed up all night doing debauched things and had one of those classic ‘Let’s start a band’ conversations.”

Once SKATERS began rolling, it was clear something was amiss. At heart, they had nothing in common with the local scene and knew they weren’t an L.A. band. “I just had to get back to New York because this music could only evolve from our East Coast sensibilities,” says Cummings. Soon, the three moved to NYC, which sparked a newfound sense of purpose and determination. “Josh said, ‘I don’t want to jam. I came here to start a fucking band. Let’s play shows.’ I said, ‘We don’t have any songs.’ He said, ‘It doesn’t matter!’ [And] the next day we booked three shows.”

The trio struggled, handing out flyers, sleeping on couches, bartending and DJ’ing. (“It was very hand-to-mouth,” Cummings says.) All the while, they were feeding off NYC’s uniquely sharp and speedy musical undercurrent. “Every song we write is about experiences we’ve had here, and the energy of the music is New York-influenced,” Cummings says. In early 2012, SKATERS released a DIY 5-song EP that the band gave away for free on their website, resulting in over 10,000 downloads, attention from the indie rock press and sold-out shows at Webster Hall Studio and the Mercury Lounge. Major-label interest followed and the band eventually signed with Warner Bros. Records in late 2012.

SKATERS are currently recording their debut album at the legendary Electric Lady Studios―built by Jimi Hendrix and host to such iconic New York rock albums as Patti Smith’s debut, Horses―with veteran producer John Hill (Santigold, M.I.A., Wavves). “Hill has an expansive sonic vocabulary,” explains Cummings. “We didn’t want to make another standard rock record, but an album of songs that reflected all the things about music that we love.”

The band will debut their new material this summer on the European and U.S. festival circui, alongside nonstop club dates. So what does the band consider the ideal exchange for being the new leaders of New York City’s local scene? “I just want this record to be able to be played in all environments,” Cummings says. “If people were getting together for a party and you threw this record on, and everyone started to dance, I’d feel like I did my part.”

“I Wanna Dance (But I Don’t Know How)” B/W ”Armed” on real 7” round, 45 rpm vinyl single out April 9, 2013 and meant to be played on a “Record Player” real loud.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

It’s part of New York City’s bargain with the world: It remains the greatest city on the planet as long as every few years, it births a band that revamps the musical landscape. From Talking Heads to Ramones, The Strokes to Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem to fun., the grand tradition has carried on for decades.

Which group is poised to lead the charge next? We vote for SKATERS, whose explosive debut
7-inch, "I Wanna Dance (But I Don't Know How),” will be released on vinyl by Warner Bros. Records this April 9th. Not only is the band bursting with Manhattan pride, but they’ve also scored early love from the British music press, thanks to their street-smart style and tough, witty, gear-stripping shake appeal. “I think London and New York are often on the same page, musically,” says singer Michael Ian Cummings, which explains why those on other side of the pond have so lovingly embraced the band.

Though, like the best New Yorkers, the trio is in the city by choice. Cummings and drummer Noah Rubin were teenage friends who bonded over Pavement records and played together in punk bands in the Boston suburbs. However, the friends headed west before connecting with British guitarist Joshua Hubbard via a chance encounter. “It was very weird,” Cummings says of his first meeting of Hubbard at a Los Angeles house party. ”We stayed up all night doing debauched things and had one of those classic ‘Let’s start a band’ conversations.”

Once SKATERS began rolling, it was clear something was amiss. At heart, they had nothing in common with the local scene and knew they weren’t an L.A. band. “I just had to get back to New York because this music could only evolve from our East Coast sensibilities,” says Cummings. Soon, the three moved to NYC, which sparked a newfound sense of purpose and determination. “Josh said, ‘I don’t want to jam. I came here to start a fucking band. Let’s play shows.’ I said, ‘We don’t have any songs.’ He said, ‘It doesn’t matter!’ [And] the next day we booked three shows.”

The trio struggled, handing out flyers, sleeping on couches, bartending and DJ’ing. (“It was very hand-to-mouth,” Cummings says.) All the while, they were feeding off NYC’s uniquely sharp and speedy musical undercurrent. “Every song we write is about experiences we’ve had here, and the energy of the music is New York-influenced,” Cummings says. In early 2012, SKATERS released a DIY 5-song EP that the band gave away for free on their website, resulting in over 10,000 downloads, attention from the indie rock press and sold-out shows at Webster Hall Studio and the Mercury Lounge. Major-label interest followed and the band eventually signed with Warner Bros. Records in late 2012.

SKATERS are currently recording their debut album at the legendary Electric Lady Studios―built by Jimi Hendrix and host to such iconic New York rock albums as Patti Smith’s debut, Horses―with veteran producer John Hill (Santigold, M.I.A., Wavves). “Hill has an expansive sonic vocabulary,” explains Cummings. “We didn’t want to make another standard rock record, but an album of songs that reflected all the things about music that we love.”

The band will debut their new material this summer on the European and U.S. festival circui, alongside nonstop club dates. So what does the band consider the ideal exchange for being the new leaders of New York City’s local scene? “I just want this record to be able to be played in all environments,” Cummings says. “If people were getting together for a party and you threw this record on, and everyone started to dance, I’d feel like I did my part.”

“I Wanna Dance (But I Don’t Know How)” B/W ”Armed” on real 7” round, 45 rpm vinyl single out April 9, 2013 and meant to be played on a “Record Player” real loud.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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