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Runaways Volume 1: Pride And Joy Digest: Pride and Joy v. 1 Paperback – 6 Dec 2006

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Paperback, 6 Dec 2006
£21.90 £4.16
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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics; 01 edition (6 Dec. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785113797
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785113799
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.3 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 197,049 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Most Teenagers think their parents are evil, but in the case of the Runaways - They actually are. The first of Marvel's Manga Sized comic book collections to appeal to teenagers, Runaways is an exciting superhero romp with excellent artwork and storyline from Brian K Vaughan (Writer of Y the Last Man & Mystique). Being the first in a 3 book series, this collection is all about the origin of the Runaways, and as such you may think It could be a bit slow. However, Runaways: Pride & Joy still manages to weave in some good fight scenes, subplots and romance as well as clearly defining out who the characters are. With 6 kids and 12 parents, it should mean that its hard to follow who's who, but Adrian Alphona gives each set of parents their own look and its quite easy to get to know the traits of the different characters. Overall this is one of the best new series from Marvel in the last couple of years, and I highly recommend it to fans of the superhero genre or teen drama.
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By Ian Williams VINE VOICE on 23 April 2004
Format: Paperback
Oookay, this is an odd one in several ways. For a start, it's one of ahandful of trade paperbacks that Marvel are publishing in a handy,reasonably-priced,manga-sized edition and the format works. It containsthe first 6 issues of the comic book which effectively set the scene.
Second odd thing is that it's an original take on the teen superherogroup, except for one thing which I'll get back to very soon. The premiseis this: at an annual get together of a group of six families, the kids(all only children, apparently)discover that their parents are a secretgroup of supervillains who think nothing of committing murder. Whathappens next is that the kids go on the run, albeit not very far, as theyvisit each others houses and experience more surprises such as discoveringsome of them have super powers. The rest you can find out foryourself.
The downside, for me (other people think it's great), is the wide-mouthedmanga-influenced artwork, but the story has more than enough going tocompensate. If you're a fan of this style then you'll be in heaven.
The kids themselves are an interesting well-characterised bunch and so,from the hints thrown out, are their parents who are an unusual collectionof villains. There's a strong feeling of only the surface being scratchedhere which makes you want to find out more and I'll certainly be aroundfor succeeding volumes.
However, and this is the third odd thing (original plot being the second,no mean feat in this genre), the group itself is modelled directly on theWolfman/Perez version of the Teen Titans. I don't know if writer Vaughandid this intentionally, and I could well believe it's subconscious on hispart, but the parallels are too strong to ignore.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed runaways! I think it's probably more suited to a younger audience (I'm in my early 20s, and it feels maybe more aimed at teenagers) but it was good fun anyway, and reminded me of reading Spider-man comics earlier in life, and has everything that makes Marvel great; the fun, the feel that these are real characters that you can relate to.
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Format: Paperback
Mums and dads play a major role in superhero stories. Frequently they are the hero’s main motivation for becoming the superhero in the first place: Bruce Wayne’s parents were shot dead, Kal-El’s parents’ last act was to send him to Earth where he became Superman, Peter Parker’s father figure Uncle Ben was killed by a mugger, Hal Jordan’s dad died in a plane crash, Odin gave Thor his powers by forging Mjolnir, Charles Xavier shepherded untold numbers of young mutants to realise their full potential, and so on.

Brian K Vaughan’s Runaways are similar in that the characters are made into superheroes through their parents - except they’re forced to step up and make that choice because their parents are supervillains trying to kill them!

Alex, Gertrude, Karolina, Chase, Molly and Nico are the teenage offspring of well-to-do Californian philanthropists. When their parents gather to decide which charities to patronise for the following year, the bored kids decide to spy on the dull grown-ups - and then discover that their parents are secretly supervillains in a group called The Pride! The murder of an innocent at the hands of their mums and dads makes up their minds for them - they have to run away, or they could be next!

I’m a big Brian K Vaughan fan so I’m not sure how it’s taken me this long to get around to this series but I’m glad I did because Runaways is terrific! Like Joss Whedon, Vaughan’s speciality is self-aware drama with the right amount of levity, as well as writing superb dialogue for convincing young characters. There’s not a single member of the group that doesn’t feel like a real teenager or unlikeable in any strong way.
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Format: Paperback
Received this book for Christmas and on the FIRST read-through 4 pages just fell out from the middle of the binding! The glue seems very poor and it looks likely that I'll get more loose pages when I eventually read the book again. This 'new' version has an ORANGE cover to it. I have since bought other volumes in the Runaways series and they are an older, BLUE-covered version - I am pleased to report that no pages have fallen out of these!

The story itself is quite interesting, a nice spin on the 'evil' parents angle. It will be interesting to see how the characters develop and work together to 'beat the odds' against their more powerful opponents!

Well worth a read but be warned about possible problems with the pages!
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