• RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £0.31 (3%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Run, Swim, Throw, Cheat: ... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Missing shrink-wrap, activation codes for bonus online content may be missing or expired. Medium mark / wear on the front cover. Small wrinkle / bend on the spine. Small mark / wear on the pages. All purchases eligible for Amazon customer service and a 30-day return policy.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Run, Swim, Throw, Cheat: The science behind drugs in sport Paperback – 29 Aug 2013

4.5 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.68
£6.19 £6.00
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£10.68 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Run, Swim, Throw, Cheat: The science behind drugs in sport
  • +
  • The Sports Gene: Talent, Practice and the Truth About Success
Total price: £20.66
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (29 Aug. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199678782
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199678785
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 2.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 160,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

this [is an] authoritative primer on the science of doping (Brian Schofield, Sunday Times {Culture})

An interesting and informative book ... This book would be an excellent accompaniment to the coverage of the Olympic games this summer. (Chemistry World)

[This book] provides for the first time an in-depth explanation of how drugs can improve sporting performance. (Mark Perryman, Morning Star)

[a] pacy account (Nature Magazine)

About the Author

Chris Cooper is a distinguished biochemist with over 20 years research and teaching experience. He was awarded a PhD in 1989, a Medical Research Council Fellowship in 1992, and a Wellcome Trust University Award in 1995. In 1997 he was awarded the Melvin H. Knisely Award for 'Outstanding international achievements in research related to oxygen transport to tissue' and in 1999 he was promoted to a Professorship in the Centre for Sports and Exercise Science at the University of Essex. His research interests explore the interface of scientific disciplines. His current biochemical interests include developing artificial blood to replace red cell transfusions. His biophysics and engineering skills are being used in designing and testing new portable oxygen monitoring devices to aid UK athletes in their training for the London 2012 Olympics. In 1997 he edited a book entitled Drugs and Ergogenic Aids to Improve Sport Performance.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
It's a curious phenomena, but adding the word "popular" to any academic subject seems to carry with it a perjorative tag (eg "popular science", "popular history"). There seems to be a feeling in some quarters that having a book labelled as 'popular' is a way of saying that it is contributing to the general dumbing down of the masses.
However in many ways nothing could be further from the truth, as popular [(insert your chosen topic here)] books are notoriously difficult to get right and having read a panoply over the years you realise there is a real art to getting them spot on.

It is with pleasure, therefore, that I can report that this book is one of those few to get it right...and so very right!

Not only is this a masterclass in how to write clear spare scientific prose but it also manages to simplify fairly complex topics without sacrificing accuracy on the Altar of the jealous 'god' Booksales. This of course isn't easy to do and so it's not done perfectly ....but few things are perfect are they?

The books point of departure is the now notorious event of the 100m mens final at the 1988 Seoul Olympics where the majority of those taking part can be seen to have been tainted with the stigma of having used (potentially or obviously) performance enhancing drugs at one point in time or another.

The books then describes the why's and the how's of this subject by delving into the physiology, pharmacology and genetics of exercise. It is quite up to date and I would recommend it to all science students doing A-levels all the way up to PhD's and beyond (and to anyone else interested in the topic.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
(I should preface this review with the fact I was looking for more of an academic book with lots od detail and not much in the way of a narrative. This book does not fulfill those criteria).

This book is fine if you're a slightly familiar with physiology/pharmacology and the information here is useful. It does tend to be a bit long-winded and some of the tangents are a bit irritating when you want to get to the point but that is in a big part due to it being inappropriate for my needs. After reading and understanding it, you will be well versed in the the how doping is used in sport and, like me, you may even suspect drug use in sports more ubiquitous than is commonly suggested in the media and that's a difficult pill to swallow (pun intended). You'll begn looking at the nation's sporting heroes in a new, cynical light because if a few athletes are doping, then what chance do the others have unless they are too.....?
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a rare breed, in that it is both a story and a science book in one fantastic amalgamation of what one would want from a sports book.

I read this book as I wanted to understand how drugs work. This book explains the effects in reasonable scientific detail without getting bogged down too much. The author weaves a good intermittent web of story and science. For example a brief history of testosterone use in sport, from testicles to modern day is covered, followed by chemical structural differentiations between nandrolone and testosterone. A great number of drugs are covered including amphetamines, testosterone, cortisone, HGH etc.

This is not just for those interested in sports and drugs but any person looking to improve their sporting performance. You will certainly find new information here of use. The sections on muscle growth covering myostatin and other protein functions etc are quite good.

I am sure the author could easily expand this book to be much longer if it were not a `restrictive subject'. However the conclusions would ultimately remain the same - drugs help, but so does self-belief.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I must say at the start that the book is a well written, well set out and thorough account of doping in sports. That being said, I can't believe I'm the only reader who struggled with the lengthy biochemistry sections. As a doctor, the science wasn't new to me, and I could understand it, but was still bored by the depth of detail in some sections. I think if I did not have a science background I would definitely have struggled.

I would also have liked some more detail of real cases/ athletes- the BALCO scandal and Tour de france drugs debacle were alluded to frequently, but some specific case studies would have livened up some of the more deadly biochemistry chunks!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an exceptionally lucid survey of a very complicated and contentious topic. For anyone watching the Olympics, taxiing a sports-mad child or training for an event it is a worthwhile read. Chris Copper is a proper scientist, unlike most commentators in the field, and does a good and amusing job of teasing out the complications.

If you think the issues are simple try this (from p178): "To summarise: the inhibition of an inhibitor leads to the activation of an inhibitor of the inhibitory pathway." As the author concedes you need some patience to be a biochemist, and a fine appreciation of the quadruple negative, I'd add.

So what is a performance enhancing drug?

Placebos work. And intra-venous placebos work even better.

Your body has 38 or more hormones controlling diverse functions such as blood cell production, mood, muscle build-up, stamina... Are these drugs? Artificial drugs mimic their actions.

Are drugs just things made in a lab? They have to bind to the same receptors as your "natural" drugs, which might also be "enhanced" by the unscrupulous. Many of these don't, in the author's view, actually work, but coffee (not banned) does.

Given the difficulty you might think to hell with it, let them take dope and see the best doper win. This is a view shared by many athletes. Asked in a survey whether they would take (undetected) drugs guaranteeing sporting glory for five years, only to drop dead the day after, 50% of respondents answered "yes". (We aren't told what proportion of the other 50% was holding out for a longer winning streak.)

There are four good reasons for carrying on this "unwinnable" war on drugs. First, body building. Anyone know more than a wife and a dog who watches this sport? Second, East Germany.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback