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Rumpelstiltskin (Matthew Hope) Kindle Edition

4 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Length: 289 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Description

About the Author

Ed McBain was one of the pen names of successful and prolific crime fiction author Evan Hunter (1926-2005). Debuting in 1956, the popular 87th Precinct series is one of the longest running crime series ever published, featuring more than 50 novels, and is hailed as "one of the great literary accomplishments of the last half-century." McBain was awarded the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in 1986 by the Mystery Writers of America and was the first American to receive the Cartier Diamond Dagger award from the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2289 KB
  • Print Length: 289 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (12 Mar. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00B87R8TA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #57,634 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The second of McBain's Matthew Hope mysteries (the first was "Goldilocks"), following the career of the Florida lawyer. McBain provides a distinctly contemporary take on fairy tales, this time in the form of a faded rock star whose fragile voice had once been turned from pure chaff into purest gold.
Matthew leaves her bed one night, and leaves her to the mercies of a murderer who brutally silences her then kidnaps her child. Is this an opportunistic kidnapping? Or is there a more sinister element tied to a trust fund set up for the singer?
McBain again explores the angst of divorce and separation from one's children, with telling passages on the trials and tribulations of the single male parent trying to cope with the demands of a teenage daughter (I speak as the father of girls myself).
The Matthew Hope mysteries are well-crafted, beautifully written whodunnits: they are also exploratons of male sexuality and relationships; and the pace is regulated by moments of wry humour, philosophical insights ... and a discourse on the colour of pubic hair.
A fine page-turner of a book - elegant, satisfying, a good example of the craftsman at work.
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Format: Hardcover
The second of McBain's Matthew Hope mysteries (the first was "Goldilocks"), following the career of the Florida lawyer. McBain provides a distinctly contemporary take on fairy tales, this time in the form of a faded rock star whose fragile voice had once been turned from pure chaff into purest gold.
Matthew leaves her bed one night, and leaves her to the mercies of a murderer who brutally silences her then kidnaps her child. Is this an opportunistic kidnapping? Or is there a more sinister element tied to a trust fund set up for the singer?
McBain again explores the angst of divorce and separation from one's children, with telling passages on the trials and tribulations of the single male parent trying to cope with the demands of a teenage daughter (I speak as the father of girls myself).
The Matthew Hope mysteries are well-crafted, beautifully written whodunnits: they are also exploratons of male sexuality and relationships; and the pace is regulated by moments of wry humour, philosophical insights ... and a discourse on the colour of pubic hair.
A fine page-turner of a book - elegant, satisfying, a good example of the craftsman at work.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellently conceived and written story. I should have awarded four and a half or five stars, had it not been for the bad language. Sorry, have no time for dirty words. They really are not necessary. One can tell the same story every bit as convincingly without bad language. Dirty words do NOT enhance the narrative. It does not impress or convince me to hear an argument that 'This is how people speak'. I don't, but then I am not a character in a McBain tale. All the same, I keep bad words out of my brain, and feel assaulted when anyone puts them there. Not at all worthy of McBain, who once gave us good stories without them. Now that he is dead, he can't do it again. A great pity about the language. A superb writer letting himself down.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The storyline is fairly weak and so continuityily lost. Ed Mcbain relies too much on 'related lines' ie letting the dialogue unfold via discussion between characters. (an easy way to tell the story both on screen and in book form) As with others in the series it is aimed at an American reader.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am a great McBain fan, but this (and others in the Matthew Hope series) are very disappointing. The book is sort of fun, as it features the usual McBain humour, but it is repetitive and the characters are unconvincing. Completely unmemorable, too. Not quite as bad as Mary, Mary
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Hope is a lawyer and is therefore not like a policeman. I heard mcbain say at a reading that he found it harder to find cases for a lawyer. It is still a good read as it seemed not to be possible for mcbain to write badly
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Format: Kindle Edition
Really good with twists and turns. Looking out for clues that would link to original story.

Would recommend to any one who likes crime thrillers, Hitchcock, etc.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read nearly all Ed McBain books over the years and have the books all in a little bookcase so when I got the chance to put it on my kindle I bought the books
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