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Ruling Oneself Out: A Theory of Collective Abdications (Politics, History, and Culture) (Politics, History, & Culture) Hardcover – 15 Jul 2008


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Review

“"Ruling Oneself Out" is a tour de force, a compelling contribution to our understanding of two of the most troubling moments of the past century and the more general phenomenon of democratic representation and its retention.”—David D. Laitin, Stanford University

“"Ruling Oneself Out" reads like a novel: we hear the voices of the protagonists, enter their minds, and emerge with an understanding of a fascinating theoretical puzzle. Drawing on richly documented primary sources, employing state-of-the-art analytical tools, and carefully staking theoretical claims, Ivan Ermakoff makes intelligible events that shook world history. A remarkable achievement.”—Adam Przeworski, New York University

“In this innovative book, Ivan Ermakoff combines game theory with detailed archival research to provide a brilliant and surprising interpretation of a long-standing historical puzzle. "Ruling Oneself Out" opens new vistas for the sociological study of historical events.”—William H. Sewell Jr., University of Chicago

"In this innovative book, Ivan Ermakoff combines game theory with detailed archival research to provide a brilliant and surprising interpretation of a long-standing historical puzzle. "Ruling Oneself Out" opens new vistas for the sociological study of historical events."--William H. Sewell Jr., University of Chicago

""Ruling Oneself Out" reads like a novel: we hear the voices of the protagonists, enter their minds, and emerge with an understanding of a fascinating theoretical puzzle. Drawing on richly documented primary sources, employing state-of-the-art analytical tools, and carefully staking theoretical claims, Ivan Ermakoff makes intelligible events that shook world history. A remarkable achievement."--Adam Przeworski, New York University

""Ruling Oneself Out" is an extremely impressive scholarly achievement at multiple levels. It offers a model of how to identify and pose an important research question; that is, a question worth asking and answering not only because it is intrinsically interesting but also because it is theoretically puzzling and at the same time of great practice significance. "Ruling Oneself Out" is all this and more."--Howard Kimeldorf, "Social Science History"

""Ruling Oneself Out" presents a compelling theory of why solitary legislative dissent. . . is rare, particularly in highly charged political contexts. . . . [S]cholars. . . should be reading and referring to this book for a long time to come. It should also find its way onto the shelves of social scientists interested in formal modeling, democratic breakdown, and/or exemplary methodology in historical research."--Malcolm Fairbrother, "Contemporary Sociology"

"Ruling Oneself Out" is a tour de force, a compelling contribution to our understanding of two of the most troubling moments of the past century and the more general phenomenon of democratic representation and its retention. David D. Laitin, Stanford University"

"Ruling Oneself Out" reads like a novel: we hear the voices of the protagonists, enter their minds, and emerge with an understanding of a fascinating theoretical puzzle. Drawing on richly documented primary sources, employing state-of-the-art analytical tools, and carefully staking theoretical claims, Ivan Ermakoff makes intelligible events that shook world history. A remarkable achievement. Adam Przeworski, New York University"

In this innovative book, Ivan Ermakoff combines game theory with detailed archival research to provide a brilliant and surprising interpretation of a long-standing historical puzzle. "Ruling Oneself Out" opens new vistas for the sociological study of historical events. William H. Sewell Jr., University of Chicago"

"Ruling Oneself Out" is an extremely impressive scholarly achievement at multiple levels. It offers a model of how to identify and pose an important research question; that is, a question worth asking and answering not only because it is intrinsically interesting but also because it is theoretically puzzling and at the same time of great practice significance. "Ruling Oneself Out" is all this and more. --Howard Kimeldorf, "Social Science History""

"Ruling Oneself Out" presents a compelling theory of why solitary legislative dissent. . . is rare, particularly in highly charged political contexts. . . . [S]cholars. . . should be reading and referring to this book for a long time to come. It should also find its way onto the shelves of social scientists interested in formal modeling, democratic breakdown, and/or exemplary methodology in historical research. --Malcolm Fairbrother, "Contemporary Sociology""

From the Back Cover

""Ruling Oneself Out" is a tour de force, a compelling contribution to our understanding of two of the most troubling moments of the past century and the more general phenomenon of democratic representation and its retention."--David D. Laitin, Stanford University

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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant 28 April 2015
By Stonecipher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an outstanding and highly innovative piece of scholarship -- probably among the best books of comparative & historical sociology in the past decade. Ermakoff combines in-depth archival research with rigorous, systematic analysis (using game theory, small group ecology) to show how contingent historical events can be.
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