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In the Ruins (The Crown of Stars Series, Book 6) Paperback – 2 Feb 2006

3.9 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 832 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit; New Ed edition (2 Feb. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841492736
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841492735
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 4.2 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 224,201 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A gripping and enthralling fantasy epic (THE TIMES)

A grand and powerful piece of writing (Katharine Kerr)

Book Description

The sixth volume in Kate Elliott's sweeping fantasy epic of war-torn kingdoms and a cataclysm foretold.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This 6th Volume follows on directly from the 5th. The story storms straight into the plots and threads of the previous book with great pace and surprises. The whole book still provides unpredictable choices made by leading characters and unexpected events that shape the whole story in a way that sets up the final volume brilliantly....a real cliffhanger that all fans of this series will enjoy.
Without giving too much away, there are interesting developments after the return of the Ashioi in the aftermath of the great spell worked at the end of the last book; Sanglant as heir to his father's kingdom tries to fill his father's shoes, and in turn that provides a new slant on his relationship with Liath. We find out what happened to Alain and his story in particular is intriguing and not completely certain to the reader yet.
There are some fascinating movements by Queen Adelheid and Antonia emerges again and becomes Skopos, joining forces with Adelheid....and they acquire some VERY surprising prisoners!
Not so surprising is the fact that Hugh has survived, but he again proves to be unpredictable. Plus there are chapters showing the state of play of characters such as Ivar and Baldwin, Stronghand, Sapientia, Theophanu and Blessing, et al.
The book is as fast paced and full of plots and sub plots as the other 5 books in the series. Fans will thoroughly enjoy this book. To other readers, I highly recommend reading the other 5 books first to get acquainted with the book's mythology and characters. FIVE STARS!
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Format: Paperback
It has been a long time since I read Child of Flame by Kate Elliott and the author gives us her apology at the beginning. The last novel is so long it has been split into books six and seven. Needed for the story of Sanglant and Liath to come to an end, this is now epic.
It does now threaten to spill over into Jordan-esque longevity but without quite the intricate descriptions of mundane life.
So, having published a map of (clearly resembling Europe) Liath has unleashed a cataclysm on the world, freed the Aishoi back to eradicate humanity and ended up carried naked by griffins back to Sanglant who leads a bedraggled army back to Wendar whilst Blessing cavorts around having been transported.
Much of the next five hundred pages is taken up with the aftermath of the cataclysm as our groups straggle and struggle back to whence they came and try to restore order against the swathe of destruction. As such, Sanglant confirms his becoming regnant of Wendar and Darre though he and Liath are fighting hard against Mother Scholastica's vicious attempts to nullify their marriage. Blessing finds herself throwing more and more tantrums as she escapes a crown with Berthold and others, eventually being captured by the beautifully evil Hugh of Austra and being used as a pawn in the nefarious alliance with the Aishoi. Throughout a host of other supporting characters wheel and deal to establish a foothold in the new world order whilst the Aishoi prepare to invade, the most prominent of these being the alliance between Aheleid and the new power out of destroyed Arethousa, General Alexandros.
Much of this sixth novel, as Elliott warns us in her note, deals with post cataclysmic upheaval.
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Fascinating read about how the races of Novaria recover and set about reorganising there land and how to mix with other races that have been bought back from the original spell that cast them out.

I admire Kate Elliotts skill in managing the different characters personalities so well although a good memory for the reader must be a definite requirement.
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This is the sixth book in the series of seven volume's. Well what can i say, its long and so much of it unnecessary. There were so many different groups of people who were captured and got away that it became monotonous and unbelievable. I agree with some of the other readers that the first two volume's were the best and very original. These books and this is no exception are a cast of thousands and so much of it disjointed, hard to read but gripping only to find some weird odd conclusions that somehow, for me doesn't hold together. lots of myth and religious input that was frankly over the top. In this book i found it a waste of time. i think Kate Elliott could easily have skipped this volume and condensed the story more. it she had done that i think it would be a better series. I have no problem with detail, but so much detail - too much on food drink and it could go on and on. I frankly skipped pages and passages like this many times over and not just in this volume.

Also what i found irritating and self indulgent in the book and previous ones is the italics and how they rambled on and on and virtually every time you didn't know who was talking and what was going on. Also when i did find out who was talking i often had to go back and reread the italics again to connect them to the person talking in the book. It felt such a mess. I read these books back to back so my heart goes out to anyone who had to wait years for these books to come out as they must have really lost the thread of what was going on.

At one point two characters in this book were talking and at first we didn't know who (that's nothing new) then when we eventually find out we still don't have a clue what they are going on about. This is when Hugh and Heribert are talking about someone Heribert loves.
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