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Rounding the Mark (The Inspector Montalbano Mysteries Book 7) by [Camilleri, Andrea]
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Rounding the Mark (The Inspector Montalbano Mysteries Book 7) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 112 customer reviews

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Review

Peppered with comments on Italian life, politics and the media, his stories are not only a joy to read, but also literary works in their own right. --New Statesman

Camilleri has created such a realistic and likeable hero that his books are both instructive and enjoyable; and the Sicilian setting is fascinating. Technically this is a police procedural; actually, it is an insightful psychological study of a good man in a deviant world. --Literary Review

Daily Telegraph

'...grouch who loves to eat with his hands and cannot tolerate ties...gentle farce, slick plotting and catchphrases lovingly rehearsed...'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1019 KB
  • Print Length: 274 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 014303748X
  • Publisher: Picador (10 Dec. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004KSRQ5K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 112 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #18,753 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Format: Hardcover
Inspector Montalbano is mightily cheesed off. His dislike of the current government has been heightened by the revelation that they ordered that evidence be fabricated against a group of political protesters in order to justify their detention. The fact that the high-ups in the police went along with it is the last straw. Montalbano has decided he's going to quit the police.

However, while having a swim in the sea to mull things over and relax a little, Montalbano accidentally bumps into another body. After apologising and receiving no reply, he discovers much to his horror that the body is a corpse. The death of the unidentified man is later put down to accidental drowning.

To cap off his week, he is called out when yet another boatload of illegal immigrants lands on Sicily's shores. While reluctantly assisting in the rounding up of the newly arrived immigrants, Montalbano notices that a little African boy has broken away from his family and has run off. He gives chase and finds the boy cowering, terrified behind some barrels. He takes the boy by the hand and leads him back to his mother. But later on, after reflection something about the boy's demeanour and his apparent terror seems to be out of proportion to the situation.

When the boy's body is found a few days later, the victim of what seems to be a hit and run accident, Montalbano feels guilty that perhaps his actions in returning the boy have somehow contributed to his death. The fact that the boy has been found in the same isolated area as the drowned man strikes Montalbano as being more than an unhappy coincidence and he takes it upon himself to investigate.
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By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 April 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Camilleri is not afraid to let Inspector Montalbano age and in this book he really is showing it. The story opens with Montalbano making an appointment to hand in his resignation, which luckily for us, never comes to fruition.

This theme of endings and exits is a continual undercurrent throughout the narrative however. Montalbano's relationship with Livia is in peril, his favourite cafe is closing. The world is changing around him and not for the better.

He comes up against illegal traffic in immigrant children and his inability to be on the ball costs him dearly more than once. The issue of his fitness for purpose is left open ended as the book closes leaving us to wonder if he will return and in what way.

One of the darker of the series but none the worse for that.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In another strong episode in the ongoing story of Salvo Montalbano and friends, Camilleri demonstrates once again that no-one manages to combine outrageous farce, tragedy, cynical political commentary and angry swipes at social injustice like Camilleri. The scene where Montalbano appears unwillingly naked on TV had me laughing out loud but the tone shifts rapidly to encompass far deeper emotions.

The title is a good example of Camilleri’s trademark light touch but I’ll leave it to potential readers to explore for themselves. If you’ve read the other books in this series then don’t hesitate about this: if you haven’t, start at the beginning and enjoy this consistently wonderful series that is both sunny and very dark.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Complex plot line as usual, Montalbano carries out an action which he thinks will help a child but it turns out to be fatal. He embarks on an investigation which leads him into personal danger but which he is determined to see through to the end. The story is very reflective of today's immigration crisis in Europe and Italy, in particular, it turns out to be a very topical subject and is therefore very believable.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I came late to the joys of the writing of Andrea Camilleri and his flawed and ageing Inspector Salvo Montalbano. Which is a tragedy for me since I dislike going back to earlier stories when I already know how the characters have evolved.

Fortunately, I came across 'The Scent of the Night' whilst on holiday so ordered this book ready for my return. I'm glad I did. This is the seventh in the series; I've no idea how many more can be created by the author but both books I've read are simply full of warmth in the writing, seriousness in the characterisation and, on top of all that, there is the added bonus of a good few snippets of Sicilian food recipes.

Camilleri, ably aided by his excellent translator, creates a picture of Sicily which you cannot help but enjoy. In a way, that there are bodies to be found (sometimes in very unexpected situations), that a murderer (or murderers) need apprehending, that the Inspector does not get on too well (to say the least) with his superiors, all this is almost incidental to way you gradually sink into the life and times of the somewhat slow-moving and ponderous Italian police force. That his love life swings like a slow-motion pendulum just piles up the pleasure for the reader.

As a mixture of Columbo, Maigret and perhaps a dash of Marlowe, this detective inspector is an excellent recipe in his own right!

I just loved this book; I hope you do, too.
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