Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Rough Guide to Thailand Paperback – 1 Oct 2009

3.9 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 1 Oct 2009
£75.12 £0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:

click to open popover


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



60 Kindle Books for £1
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to £1 each. Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 864 pages
  • Publisher: Rough Guides; 7 edition (1 Oct. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848360924
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848360921
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.3 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 356,352 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

About the Author

Paul Gray has been a regular visitor to Thailand since teaching English for a year in 1987. He now works as a managing editor at the Rough Guides office in London. Lucy Ridout has spent most of the last decade travelling in and writing about Asia. She is also the co-author of the Rough Guides to Bali and Bangkok. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

When to go The climate of most of Thailand is governed by three seasons: rainy (roughly June to October), caused by the southwest monsoon dumping moisture gathered from the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand; cool (November to February); and hot (March to May). The rainy season is the least predictable of the three, varying in length and intensity from year to year, but usually it gathers force between June and August, coming to a peak in September and October, when unpaved roads are reduced to mud troughs and whole districts of Bangkok are flooded. The cool season is the pleasantest time to visit, although temperatures can still reach a broiling 30C in the middle of the day. In the hot season, when temperatures rise to 40C, the best thing to do is to hit the beach. Within this scheme, slight variations are found from region to region. The less humid north experiences the greatest range of temperatures: at night in the cool season the thermometer occasionally approaches zero on the higher slopes, and this region is often hotter than the central plains between March and May. It's the northeast which gets the very worst of the hot season, with clouds of dust gathering above the parched fields, and humid air too. In southern Thailand, temperatures are more consistent throughout the year, with less variation the closer you get to the equator. The rainy season hits the Andaman coast of the southern peninsula harder than anywhere else in the country - heavy rainfall usually starts in May and persists at the same level until October. One area of the country, the Gulf coast of the southern peninsula, lies outside this general pattern - because it faces east, this coast and its offshore islands feel the effects of the northeast monsoon, which brings rain between October and January. This area also suffers less from the southwest monsoon, getting a relatively small amount of rain between June and September. Overall, the cool season is generally the best time to come to Thailand: as well as having more manageable temperatures and less rain, it offers waterfalls in full spate and the best of the upland flowers in bloom. Bear in mind, however, that it's also the busiest season, so forward planning is essential. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer reviews

Read reviews that mention

Top customer reviews

on 2 June 2017
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 August 2017
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 June 2014
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 March 2004
Format: Paperback
0Comment| 45 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 29 December 2007
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
0Comment| 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 16 March 2011
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 30 May 2011
Format: Paperback
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 March 2010
Format: Paperback
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Would you like to see more reviews about this item?

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?