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The Rough Guide to the Blues Paperback – 22 Feb 2007

5.0 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Rough Guides; 1 edition (22 Feb. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184353519X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843535195
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 2 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 201,907 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Author Nigel Williamson is a regular contributor to the magazines Uncut and Songlines, and is the author of The Rough Guide To Bob Dylan.


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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent introduction to the blues by enthusiast Nigel Williamson who has also written 'The Rough Guide to Bob Dylan'. The book is divided into two parts - a fascinating narrative history of the blues and an A-Z gazetteer profiling a 'broad church' of about 300 significant blues artists from Robert Johnson and Son House to Jimi Hendrix and Captain Beefheart. There are brief reviews of recommended CDs for each artist and interspersed throughout the book are various suggested playlists and features on important blues record labels. The final section of the book is a 'directory of blues resources' detailing books, websites, magazines and DVDs.

All in all this is an invaluable and entertaining guide to the blues.
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Format: Paperback
With 1000 books on the market about the history of the blues the newcomer might wonder where to start.
This is as good a place as any and the Rough Guides will be available for longer as well as being updated
The book is in 3 sections: Part One details the historical background for nearly 70 pages,Part 2 is an A to Z and Part 3 is listings of essential CDs,books,magazines and websites
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a book you can dip into - lots of info about individual artists, brief but illuminating histories of the development of the Blues,and recommended recordings you can (mostly) still buy. Very readable, whether you are an established collector or a complete newbie. And it's sensible and unpretentious. None of the 'white men can't play the Blues' nonsense! If you have the slightest leaning towards the Blues, you won't regret buying this book.
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Format: Paperback
I am sure this is a very entertaining, enjoyable book, which now seems to be getting rather expensive, but Just to clarify, I never actually earlier claimed that my earlier post was meant to be a a review of the book. I only questioned that to suggest 'The Blues crawled out of the Mississippi Delta' exclusively is a simplistic, misleading, narrow view point and does not do justice to the very many wonderful musicians from other parts of the Southern States, like Texas for instance, among other places. Also I do not agree either with people either that say ' Can Blue Men sing the Whites'? (great lampooning Bonzo Dog song) as yes there has been very many great white blues guitarist, still are, but not as many truly 'great' White Blues Singers. I think Muddy Waters once made the same point. Captain Beefheart, a true, if somewhat eccentric, genius was of course in his early days heavily influenced by Howling Wolf. Nowadays 'the Blues' seems to be enjoyed mostly by middle aged, (including me) middle class, white people. That recent 'Blues Cruise' is a case in point, which is maybe a little incongruous, but I am probably only jealous, I would love to have been on it, if I only could have afforded it.
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Format: Paperback
I haven't read this book yet, but as an almost lifelong blues fan, I am very tempted to buy it, regardless of how I suspect it most likely will get my back up, but hopefully I mighy pick up some interesting info
I suspect it might turn out to be the typical cliché'd much expounded, over simplified view, that the blues came exclusively out of the Mississippi Delta.
I for one as a young man totally bought into this viewpoint, for many years.
But this is not strictly completely true, nor is it the full story!
What came out of the Delta is the very influential, easily reconisable, and very popular, dark, moody, percussive, delta blues style.
Which came to totally dominate, over shadow and influence all the white 60's blues guitar heroes, such as Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Peter Green, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, etc.
Which I freely admit to loving at the time, and still do to this day, along with modern day exponents like Joe Bonmassa.
Almost as much in their blues/rock kind of way, but not quite as much, as I do the originals.
Robert Johnson, Son House, Muddy Waters, Charlie Patton, etc.etc. etc.
But what about all the many other areas of the South?
What about Texas, or Atlanta, for instance?
To name just two, and the many wonderful blues artists that came from there?
Either at the same time or even before.
Artists like the "Father of the Texas Blues" Blind Lemon Jefferson, or Blind Boy Fuller,
Blind Willie McTell, Lightin' Hopkins, to name just a small few.

And that doesn't even scratch the surface.
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