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Rose Under Fire by [Wein, Elizabeth]
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Rose Under Fire Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

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Length: 483 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

Praise for Code Name Verity

‘Code Name Verity does more than stick with me. It haunts me. I just can’t recommend it enough.’ – Author Maggie Stiefvater

‘I liked Code Name Verity enormously.… you are sucked into the viewpoint and don’t realise for a long time that everything is double edged and has a second meaning.’ – Author Helen Dunmore

‘A remarkable book, which had me horrified and totally gripped at the same time.’ – Daily Mail

Book Description

The sequel to the critically acclaimed novel Code Name Verity.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2940 KB
  • Print Length: 483 pages
  • Publisher: Electric Monkey (3 Jun. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CYB6ZCU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #80,231 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having wolfed down Elizabeth Wein's previous novel Code Name Verity and totally adored it, I was hungry for more. Rose Under Fire did not disappoint.

Rose Justice, a young American pilot (and amateur poet),is working for the ATA delivering planes and ferrying pilots for the RAF during World War 2. Whilst trying to bring down a 'pilotless plane' during one of her missions, she looses her way and ends up in the hands of the enemy. In Ravensbruck concentration camp she meets the 'Rabbits' - girls experimented on by Nazi doctors.

It's a chilling tale, but also one of bravery and friendship in the face of pure evil. Wonderfully told - Elizabeth Wein is a master story teller, and this book is un-put-downable.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I came to Rose Under Fire with high hopes. After devouring its companion novel Code Name Verity and recommending it to everyone I could think of, I couldn't wait to get my hands on Elizabeth Wein's next offering to see if it could possibly match up. Amazingly, it did.

Code Name Verity was a sucker-punch of a novel. It reeled me in, lulled me into a false sense of security, and then delivered a final blow that left me curled up on the couch sobbing and glad that my housemates were out so they didn't witness my embarrassing emotional breakdown. Rose Under Fire was different. The main character Rose Justice spends most of the novel in Ravensbruck concentration camp, and the story tells of the fight for survival, not only her own, but her adopted family's. Instead of being crippled by one large emotional blow, I instead found myself on the verge of tears for most of the book, sometimes not even because of particular events, but just because of the very real sense of how the daily grind of living in the dirt and the squalor of a concentration camp could crush anybody's hope.

What I love about Wein's writing is that, for me, she has given the Second World War a really human face. I remember learning about WW2 every year at school from the age of about 7. That repetition made the war feel really commonplace, unexceptional almost. I became numb to the hardships and pain of those who went through it. Code Name Verity, and now Rose Under Fire, have helped me to rediscover that period of history and think more about the individuals caught up in it.

Yet despite that strong sense of place, and the incredible amount of research that Wein obviously does to make sure that her novels are as accurate as possible, they still contain really universal themes.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've had this book on my shelf for ages. It was a recommendation but I had never really fancied it as there seems to be an overload of WW1 and WW2 books. Thought it was time to give it a go though.....
The subject matter wasn't too much of a surprise as I had read the blurb, it sounded quite interesting and a slightly unusual view of the conflict. What I hadn't appreciated was that this book has been written for the young adult market - I'm nearly 50 so not the target audience at all. This should be no excuse not to produce a well constructed and interesting book though.
Rosie narrates the book and, mostly, comes across as a young teenager who reacts in a childlike way to everything around her. The language is very modern which jars slightly and its use gave me the impression that the author was trying too hard to appeal to her market by allowing authenticity to slip and she was in danger, at times, of becoming patronising. Rosie was a hard character to engage with and I found that the poetry side of her character did not add to the plot (in fact it was an odd distraction).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Following "Code Name Verity" was always going to be a huge challenge, I'll make no bones about that. Sadly "Rose Under Fire" suffered not only from following a great act but also from not being as painfully/wonderfully gripping as its predecessor. The most obvious problem was that the main part of the story is told in retrospect. Despite the appalling things Rose experiences, somehow the edge was taken off for me because we knew her ultimate fate was freedom and a return to the people she knew.

There was still the fate of all Rose's friends and even passing acquaintances to add tension, but there was never anything like the terror from Verity of not knowing until the very end what happened to Julie.

That said, the harrowing representation of the camp was absorbing and terrifying and literally awe-inspiring. If Wein's mission was to tell the world, that she most certainly did. And that in itself earned the 4th star for this review. It may not give the 5-star dizzying highs of Verity, but I would still highly recommend reading it nonetheless. The story of the Rabbits deserves to be told, to be remembered. Lest we ever forget.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another gripping novel from Elizabeth Wein, one again focusing on the work of female pilots during the Second World War.

The principal character of this book is Rose Justice, a young American woman ho has been working flying planes around Britain. Shortly after the D Day invasions she finds herself flying some luminaries to Paris. There she is scheduled to collect a spitfire to be flown back to Britain where it will be refitted as a reconnaissance plane. However, on her journey back she spots, and successfully deflects, a V1 bomb that had been launched against Paris. However, her diversion to tackle the V1 has disastrous consequences as it takes her beyond the front line, and while she si struggling to reorient herself she finds herself by two German jet-powered fighter planes.

Like Wein's previous novels, this is peopled with some very engaging characters, and Rose's plight is described in grim, but never sensationalist, detail.
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