Listen Now
Go Unlimited
Start your 30-day free trial
Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers can play 40 million songs, thousands of playlists and ad-free stations including new releases. Learn More
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).

  
1 used from £78.79

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £11.99

From the Roots Extra tracks, Original recording remastered, Import

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Now with Amazon Music
From the Roots
"Please retry"
Amazon Music Unlimited
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Extra tracks, Original recording remastered, 9 Dec 2003
£78.79
Available from these sellers.
1 used from £78.79

Product details

  • Audio CD (9 Dec. 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Extra tracks, Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Trojan
  • ASIN: B0000TWMH0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,441,964 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
1
30
2:26
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
2
30
3:04
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
3
30
2:41
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
4
30
2:36
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
5
30
2:43
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
6
30
3:00
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
7
30
2:37
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
8
30
2:36
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
9
30
2:52
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
10
30
2:57
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
11
30
3:02
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
12
30
3:23
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
13
30
2:43
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
14
30
2:46
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
15
30
3:02
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
16
30
3:10
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
17
30
2:48
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
18
30
3:24
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
19
30
2:43
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
20
30
2:45
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
21
30
2:50
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 
22
30
2:37
Listen Now Buy: £0.99
 

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Jamaican born Frederick "Toots" Hibbert was just 18 when he formed the earliest version of The Maytals in 1961 with his two friends Nathaniel "Jerry" Mathias and Henry "Raleigh" Gordon (the three are pictured on the cover). A couple of albums (and a Sixties jail-sentence for their leader later) and you jump forward to the 1970s - and the same wiser trio made this wonderful but now largely forgotten Reggae LP "From The Roots". Sanctuary in the UK acquired the entire Trojan Records Reggae catalogue in 2001 for over £10 million and in a slew of superb CD reissues - this nifty little piece is a genuine star propping up the bar. Here are the precious metals...

UK issued in December 2003 - "From The Roots" by THE MAYTALS on Sanctuary TJCCD091 (Barcode 5050159909124) is an expanded CD version of that rare 1973 UK album and breaks down as follows (62:56 minutes):

1. Pee Pee Cluck Cluck
2. Loving Spirit
3. Doctor Lester (Aka African Doctor)
4. Gold & Silver
5. Koo Koo
6. Revival Reggae
7. Thy Kingdom Come
8. One Eye Ends
9. A Time To Love
10. 9 O'Clock
11. Know Me Good
12. Got To Feel (It)
13. Feel So Good
14. Give Peace A Chance
Tracks 1 to 14 are the album "From The Roots" issued in 1973 in the UK on Trojan TRLS 65 (recorded in/copyright date 1969)

BONUS TRACKS:
15. Israel (a 1970 Jamaican 7" single)
16. Your Troubles Are Over (an album outtake)
17. Doctor Lester [aka African Doctor] (Alternate Take)
18. Know Me Good (Alternate Take)
19. Feel So Good (Alternate Take)
20. I Alone (a 1971 single issued is Jamaica on Starapple Records)
21. One Eye Enos (a different version to the album cut; it was issued in the UK in 1971 on a 7" single Summit SUM 8520)
22.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must own for the vintage Reggae fan 23 Feb. 2014
By Biskabo Renalto - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is a great album start to finish. The recording quality is outstanding for the era, and the detail you can hear in the instruments and vocals on a good system is astonishing.

The songs are mostly faster paced ska like offerings. Very up beat and energetic. Good lyrical content as always from Toots and the Maytals, and of course the vocals are the focal point and really shine through.

Over all, I'd say this is my favorite Toots album so far. I also have "Sweet and Dandy", and "Funky Kingston", which are both fantastic as well. This album just seems to have more spiritually themed songs, and I really like that about it.

I'm gonna be playing this one on reapeat for the next month!
5.0 out of 5 stars it's the greatest. 16 Nov. 2014
By Derek Burrell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Uh, it's the greatest.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...All Over The World...Share Out The Gold And Silver..." 25 Oct. 2009
By Mark Barry - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Jamaican born Frederick "Toots" Hibbert was just 18 when he formed the earliest version of The Maytals in 1961 with his two friends Nathaniel "Jerry" Mathias and Henry "Raleigh" Gordon (the three are pictured on the cover). A couple of albums and a Sixties jail-sentence for their leader later, and you jump forward to the 1970s - and the same wiser trio made this wonderful, but now largely-forgotten reggae LP.

UK issued in December 2003, Sanctuary TJCCD091 is an expanded version of that rare album (Sanctuary acquired the entire Trojan catalogue in 2001 for over £10 million) and in a slew of superb CD reissues - this is another genuine goody...

It breaks down as follows (62:56 minutes):
Tracks 1 to 14 are the album "From The Roots" issued in 1973 in the UK on Trojan TRLS 65 (recorded in/copyright date 1969)
Track 15 is "Israel", a 1970 Jamaican 7" single
Track 16 is "Your Troubles Are Over", an album outtake
Tracks 17, 18 and 19 are "Alternate Takes" of 3 album tracks, "Doctor Lester [aka African Doctor]", "Know Me Good" and "Feel So Good"
Track 20 is "I Alone" - a 1971 single issued is Jamaica on Starapple Records
Track 21 is "One Eye Enos" - a different version to the album cut; it was issued in the UK in 1971 on a 7" single Summit SUM 8520
Track 22 is "Funky Funky" - a 1971 Jamaican 7" single issued on Beverley's Records

The album was produced by the legendary but short-lived LESLIE KONG (he died in 1971 aged only 37) - a young Chinese immigrant who was instrumental in the recording and acceptance of Jamaican music in its formative years (he did Bob Marley's 1st single in 1962). The 12-page foldout insert has affectionate liner notes by HARRY HORNBY while the whole project was co-ordinated and compiled by LAURENCE CANE-HONEYSETT and JOHN REED - both of whom have extensive writing and compiling experience across a huge range of Trojan releases. Excepting the cover of John Lennon's "Give Peace A Chance", all tracks are Hibbert originals - and there's even a card wrap on the outside depicting the original album sleeve that gives the whole release a classy feel...

Given the less-than-stellar quality of the original recordings (reggae is notoriously non-audiophile), the sound quality on these Cedar-improved remasters is superb - muscular and clear. Personal favourites include the sharing-out-our-wealth song "Gold And Silver" (lyrics above) and the superb "Loving Spirit" which is imbibed with Hibbert's strong belief in love channelled through God and music. The extras are ace too - personally I feel the 'Alternate Take' of "Know Me Good" is better than the released album version and "Funky Funky" is a wicked little groover of a record that must be impossible to find on original vinyl...and a cool rediscovery.

"From The Roots" is a sweetheart of an album and it's listed value at £30 in the Record Collector Price Guide of 2010 doesn't in any way reflect the difficulty you would have in locating an original copy. For under eight dollars, you can easily get this expanded CD instead. It's a journey you should take...and well done to all the good people involved in keeping this particular reggae flame alive.

PS: if you're looking for more music in the same vein, see my reviews for the 2CD DELUXE EDITIONS of the following 4 iconic British LP releases all of which were also on the Trojan Records label - "Tighten Up Volume 1" and "Tighten Up Volume 2" by VARIOUS ARTISTS, "1000 Volts Of Holt" by JOHN HOLT and "Skinhead Moonstomp" by SYMARIP

PPS: for Island Records UK - see also my review of the 2009 mini box set "War Ina Babylon" (3CDs)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Do Not Even Read This Review. Just Move Your Mouse Pointer Over To The "Buy" Button 3 Aug. 2013
By Zon||Eidolon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Seldom do I encounter popular music which both embodies and gives me true, unadulterated joy... music that is a celebration of life itself. Seldom, that is, outside of this group. The Maytals are a musical group like no other - whenever I put on their music I am guaranteed to feel pure spiritual ecstasy. And that's rare.

"From The Roots" is a collection of Maytals recordings from the early 70s by producer Leslie Kong. Every song on here is worth listening to, and you will probably listen to them over and over. I do. Astute buyers will notice some song overlap with the earlier album "Monkey Man", but this is normal for Jamaican music of the time - "albums" were just collections of songs recorded individually over time as singles and "compiled" onto LP later. Often you will find early reggae albums released within just a few years of each other or even simultaneously in different countries with many of the same songs on them (the concept of a rock-style, cohesive reggae "album" wouldn't exist until Island Records released The Wailers' "Catch a Fire" in 1973). I don't mind this overlap at all - the day I complain about having to listen to the same Maytals song twice is the day I am tired of life.

The sound on this CD is good, especially given Jamaican recording technology in the early 70s - Trojan did a good job. There is a booklet included and the whole thing comes in a slipcase which is nice. Apparently this CD is now out of print, which should be a criminal offense. Oh well, you can still download the mp3s. If you like reggae or music or even life in general you should buy this now.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I don't give 5 stars very often... Almost never. 19 Aug. 2006
By D. D. Harwood - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I have a friend who once moved into an apartment and found a big stack of records abandoned by the previous tenant. Mostly they were the standard stuff, y'know, a couple of Zeppelin albums, the Woodstock Movie soundtrack, a bunch of those lame Doors compilations, a ton of 80's metal along the lines of ZZTop and Def Leopard, and, of course, Peter Frampton Comes Alive! But in there amongst the general trash was this little Gem: From The Roots by The Maytals. When my friend threw a party at his new place we dug through his newfound batch of records and gently poked fun at the previous tenant's poor musical taste (very gently though because we both have a bunch of those records in our collections too). When I picked up From The Roots and made a snide comment about the first song, "Pee Pee Cluck Cluck", my friend stopped me. "Hold on, that record's awesome. That one's the best in the stack and that's probably the best song on the album," he said. "What?! You gotta be kidding me? Pee Pee Cluck Cluck? C'mon," I snorted. He put up his hand and said, "I laughed until I listened to it too, Dude."

Until that moment my experience with reggae was limited pretty much to Bob Marley whom I associated, with a certain degree of hatred, with the hackey-sack-playing dope-smokin'-morons at the end of the hall in my college dorm. As far as The Maytals go I was familliar with The Harder They Come Soundtrack but that was the only record I had that could remotely be considered reggae. From The Roots opened my eyes and "Pee Pee Cluck Cluck" launched the entire party right into space. I Immediately taped it from my friend's scratchy copy, put it in my car stereo and NEVER took it out. In fact that car went to the scrap yard with that tape still stuck in the broken deck. By that time, of course, I'd found my own vinyl copy and to this day it just doesn't feel right to sit on the porch in the sun without that record playing.

I spent a couple of years searching used bins and flea markets for that LP though. At the time Trojan Records was reissuing pretty much their whole catalogue except, for some reason, this album. Now, lucky for you, it's available on Amazon with, basically, another entire albums worth of bonus tracks tacked on the end.

I can't speak to the bonus tracks but the original album contains not one bummer. Not a single one! (Although sometimes I have been known to skip "Give Peace A Chance".) If ever there was a reggae (Not Dub, folks, not Dub) dance record this is it. In fact, if you can keep your feet from moving and a smile from your face during any of these tracks, especially "Revival Reggae", then I surmise that you're at the low end of your manic depressive cycle. Take your meds.

If you're new to the genre or you're just bored of your Bob Marley records then this is the place to start. There are several "Best Of' compilations out there and they're good starts too but for whatever reason there are virtually no songs from this record on any of them. This record was released when they were still calling themselves simply "The Maytals" before they became "Toots &..." Maybe that's why the very few versions of songs from this record that do appear on the Best-Ofs are different versions and all inferior. Who knows.

This record does lean a little to the religious end of the reggae spectrum but the infectious beats (oh God, I can't believe I just said "infectious beats") still make songs like "Thy Kingdom Come" absolutely unskippable. That said though if you're looking for reggae like "No Woman, No Cry" then this ain't it. Some would call The Maytals ska but I disagree on a technicality. Reggae sounded more like ska before there was ska but then reggae slowed down and got more stoned and stole the reggae label, so then, what was originally reggae became ska. Undesrtand? (This is why I hate labels; it's all rock-n-roll to me.) In fact, just to demonstrate the broad appeal here, the Specials [ska] covered Monkey Man on their 1980 LP and The Clash [rock] covered "Pressure Drop" on their classic London Calling in '79. Neither of those songs are on the LP I'm currently talking about but... You get point.

Anyway, to simplify things it's more ska-ish than reggae if you're used to that Bob Marley sort of thing. But you should be bored with that stuff by now. Broaden your horizons and pick up this record. You'll be happier for it.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Look for similar items by category