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A Room Of One's Own by [Woolf, Virginia]
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A Room Of One's Own Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 98 customer reviews

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Kindle Edition, 6 May 2014
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Length: 125 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

Review

Probably the most influential piece of non-fictional writing by a woman in this century (Hermione Lee Financial Times)

Book Description

With an exclusive new introduction by Ali Smith, Virginia Woolf's famous polemic is brought to new life on audio

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 626 KB
  • Print Length: 125 pages
  • Publisher: HarperPerennial Classics (6 May 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JOH5O2O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 98 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #31,741 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio Download Verified Purchase
Great book. Brilliantly narrated by Juliet Stevenson
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good read
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like it
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An incredibly lazy job of editing and frustratingly unreadable format cost me 77p. When I purchase a classic that I could read for free elsewhere, I really prefer that the majority of words are intact, not cut off at the end of every other line and chunks of text occasionally skipped altogether. Furthermore, unlike most kindle texts, I was unable to scroll through the text to highlight/use the dictionary etc. POOR. Yes, we're in a recession yet it's much more for the principle than the financial stretch of the 77p that I urge you to buy another edition.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As much as I want to, I cannot get on with Virginia Woolf. I've tried (twice!) to read Mrs Dalloway and only get about half-way through before I admit defeat. As an aspiring writer, I thought this might be more to my taste. However, it is Woolf's rambling writing style that I find really hard and, despite my interest in the subject matter, she went off the point so often that it was hard to pick out what the point actually was! I spoke to a very well-read friend and she suggested that I try Orlando so I'll give that a go but I may just have to accept that I am not a fan. Third time lucky maybe!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's a really small book and really cute. It was a present... so I can't say anything about the story
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Format: Kindle Edition
I did a module on Virginia Woolf at university. I read Jacob's Room, Orlando, To The Lighthouse, Mrs Dalloway and Between The Acts, I also read a lot of general remarks by her, but I did not read A Room Of One's Own. I actually got a first in the essay I wrote on Woolf, a fact that still baffles me to this day, as I generally found no particular affinity for her as an author.

I saw A Room Of One's Own up for grabs in the library, and as it's rather slight, thought : Why Not?

It's an extended essay over several chapters, and interesting from a number of perspectives. It is borne of a much shorter address that Woolf was asked to give to Oxbridge on Women And Fiction, and generally is a feminist perspective on the historical progress of women as authors. Ironically, it's now a historical piece in itself, and one far detached from the realities of today's female writers.

Woolf, from a wealthy, well connected background argues that to succeed as a female writer one needs an independent means, (Woolf rather quaintly recommends £500 a year) and a room of one's own to write in.

She talks about Charlotte Bronte and Jane Austen, how in Austen's case writing, prior to her fame, was almost a dirty secret, how Charlotte's frustrations at the limitations of her sex can be seen in Jane Eyre almost to its detraction as a work of fiction. (I've always thought Jane Eyre over-rated)

The male reaction to female writing and how it was seen as an intellectual threat is a diverting topic and the sexism of even Woolf's own era extraordinary.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I admit that as a younger student I found Woolf rather dull and distasteful. There was something so inaccessible and over-done about her writing. However, I came to understand my own ignorance and come to a love of Woolf by seeing her as a poet, as a thinker, and not as a novelist. It is true that her writing is complex, erudite and ambiguous but that is its charm, its enigmatic charm - and A Room of One's Own is no exception.
This is not a novel but rather a set of essays given to an audience of young cambridge girl students. The book opens with the wonderful premise 'A Woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction'. Thus, we are made to understand immediately the crux of the book; that intellectual freedom depends upon material things and that for women to create works comparable to Shakespeare's tragedies she must have a sense of autonomy.
Woolf proceeds to take us on a witty journey through the history of women and literature to explain why the female sex has always been limited. She concots, for sake of argument, the figure of Shakespeare's sister, who like her elder brother had a talent for theatre and creation of art. Due to her sex she is limited and ends up leading a frustrated life and ultimately killing herself. Woolf ends the book by calling her audience to write, to write widely and by doing so to emancipate Shakespeare's sister and show the men that women aren't their social, physical and mental inferiors.
One could say this is the start of feminist criticism, indeed with the book being published in the year of the acquisition of female suffrage the context would seem awfully auspicious. The book follows Woolf's ideoysncratic modernist style, pursuing the 'stream of thought' format.
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