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Roman Military Clothing (1): 100 BC-AD 200: 100 BC - AD 200 Vol 1 (Men-at-Arms) Paperback – 19 Aug 2002

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Frequently bought together

  • Roman Military Clothing (1): 100 BC-AD 200: 100 BC - AD 200 Vol 1 (Men-at-Arms)
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  • Roman Military Clothing (2): AD 200-400: AD 200-400 v. 2 (Men-at-Arms)
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  • Roman Military Clothing (3): AD 400-640: v. 3 (Men-at-Arms)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (19 Aug. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841764876
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841764870
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 0.3 x 25.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 323,015 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

GRAHAM SUMNER, who both wrote and illustrated this book, was born in 1958 and studied illustration at Wrexham Art School. He has specialised in archaeological reconstruction drawings; and has been involved with the Ermine Street Guard - the Roman experimental history group - for nearly 20 years. He has published a number of articles on the Roman army, and was the author of the popular Roman Army: Wars of the Empire (Brasseys). This is his first book for Osprey.


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By A Customer on 27 Aug. 2002
Format: Paperback
Actually whether or not Roman Legionaries wore red or white tunics is the one thing that this book doesn't definitively answer, a summary is apparently planned for the second instalment. That said, this book is a superb investment for both the Wargamer, Military Modeller and Re-enactor. The various sources are accurately and nicely detailed and the pictures themselves are a visual treat. The "Hellenistic" Praetorian Guard of Emperor Nero will hopefully prove an inspiration to figure manufacturers, and this book will enable anyone to do a creditable paint job on them. More than just tunics are covered, with details of cloaks, scarves, and military footwear, all excellently depicted. Overall a "must-buy" for anyone interested in the subject.
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Format: Paperback
As I have just joined a roman re-enactment group, I've found this book to be very interesting and useful, it has answered a lot of questions I had in my mind about that a Legionary wore and also went some way to clarify what colours the garments were.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Affordable Book on Roman Military clothing 1 Nov. 2002
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has interesting reviews at Roman Army Talk. I liked the book but some will not agree with some of the tunic color theory. The book is really helpful for those who want to build an authentic re-enactor outfit, including information on the different styles of military shoes! The information about tunic construction and cloak types is invaluable. The color plates are nice, and realistic looking, while the line drawings and B&W illustrations are very good supporting materials. It is wonderful that this information is being made available in this format, and further volumes will follow!
If you study Romans, the Roman Army, or re-enact this time period you will want this resource close at hand. Even miniatures painters can benefit from the information presented.
5.0 out of 5 stars Roman military clothing 1 9 April 2013
By m ziemann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book gives the reader a greater insite into the clothing worn during this period. Text is very good, as well as the illustrations. This book offers a greater range of clothing to the historical painter. I have already finished my Roman army of this time period. If I had had this book as well as the other two in the series, I would have painting differently.
5.0 out of 5 stars Roman Military Clothing (1): 100 BC-AD 200 (Men-at-Arms) (Vol 1) 8 Jun. 2013
By mahdi1ray - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Splendid work. Author shows his expertise on the subject. Well researched, easy to read, and well written. A must for uniformologists, reenactors , miniature wargamers and antiquarians. As an historian, a military man and a miniature wargamer this work has special meaning for me.
3 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars So few pages - this is not a book! 21 Dec. 2006
By Shop Wise - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
May be they should call it a booklet. There are only 48 pages from front to back (including the index page). There is very little useful written information and the few illustrations have no explanation. Unless you are doing research in this area and absolutely can't find any other source of information, I would say Don't Buy This. I now realize all the Men-At-Arms series are probably all the same. Instead of compiling all three Roman Military Clothing booklets into one half-respectable "book", they opted to split up the materials and make more money. If you are interested in Roman soldiers and what they wear, The Roman Legions recreated in colour photographs is at least a bit better - though I have issues with that book as well. I wasted my money on this one, hopefully you won't.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Indispensible for the reenactor, gamer or historian 6 Dec. 2002
By David S. Michaels - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Having using this book as a resource for more than a year now, I have come to appreciate its value to the Roman reenactor, wargamer, and professional or amateur historian. After spending time going over the text in detail, I can only appreciate and admire the amount of painstaking research Mr. Sumner has compiled for this study. I admit to being a little miffed, initially, that Sumner did not once and for all end the vexing argument over the color of the Roman military tunic -- i.e. was it red, or white, or some other color, or was there no "uniform" color at all? In retrospect, if one reads between the lines, the evidence Mr. Sumner provides seems to advance the hypothesis that the Roman soldier wore a white tunic while "out of kit," and a red one under his armor when preparing for battle. The illustrations are quite nicely rendered, with an extraordinary amount of detail even by Osprey standards. In conclusion, this is definitely a worthwhile addition to the Roman military enthusiast's or reenactor's bookshelf.
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