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Rolling Papers [VINYL] Explicit Lyrics

3.8 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl (28 Mar. 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • Label: ATLANTIC
  • ASIN: B004NDVJWS
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 428,723 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

BBC Review

After a string of excellent mixtapes and releases on independent labels, Wiz Khalifa (aka Cameron Jibril Thomaz) was due a decent shot at the mainstream, and Rolling Papers pretty much offers that up. Two tracks in particular, Star of the Show and Fly Solo, let Khalifa show off real skills – solid, reliable beats with a woozy, almost whimsical layering of synths and keyboards building an engaging musical landscape around them.

It’s a method that succeeds for most of the record in several different forms: sparse (Rooftops); taut and bouncy (Black and Yellow) and almost symphonic (When I’m Gone). Apart from some of the tedious subject matter – being stoned, drinking etc – it’s the sort of rap that deserves mainstream attention as it’s musically thoughtful and endearing beyond the dancefloor. Bizarrely, though, it’s when Khalifa sets his sights on the pop world it begins to fall apart.

Roll Up, No Sleep and Get Your S*** sound like obvious choices for singles – although the latter’s brainless misogyny will probably count against it – and, as such, are probably the weakest tunes on the album. Not because there’s anything particularly wrong with them, just that they’re nothing you haven’t heard before. Many times. It’s that kind of bland, mid-tempo, chugging that trips over itself trying to be chart-friendly: the mixes are over–cluttered the frequent choruses and odd bits of shouting in the background serve to highlight the half-heartedness off the half-sung rapping. All perfectly acceptable, and enough to get noticed by daytime radio, but totally lacking in ambition or imagination.

It’s a waste, really, because he proves he’s got the ability to do much better than that while still looking at the wider market with tunes like Wake Up and The Race. They pull off the same sort of thing, but inject enough character into the layered vocals and intriguing music to create something of real interest, because you’re never quite sure what’s coming next. The former hooks you in with clever, not-there-at-all beats, while the latter is a lovely, breezy example of the sort of summertime hip hop you used to get back in the Fresh Prince days; but that charming naivety is more than compensated for with meticulously put together music. These are the sort of songs that mainstream hip hop needs, and would probably find much more entertaining than what tends to get pushed at it.

--Lloyd Bradley

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Wiz Khalifa's major label debut, Rolling Papers, has had considerable hype in the past few months. While he has made a few mixtapes and singles in the last 3 years, it was the Stargate-produced hit, 'Black and Yellow', that brought him from his underground reputation to a commercial, worldwide popularity. However, Rolling Papers is not entirely what you would expect in terms of music style, considering if you heard his music before he became mainstream. Nevertheless, the album gives the fans more of what they want, and as a result it turns out to be an enjoyable, yet slightly safe rap album, that doesn't aim to stretch the potential of Wiz Khalifa's talent.

Rolling Papers gets off to a good start with 'When I'm Gone', a futuristic and retrospective introduction, due to its interesting and unusual production and catchy chorus (this album is, for better or worse, full of them). For some reason, the album contains a lot of actual singing on Wiz's part, similar to Drake's moody 'Thank Me Later'. This track to me has a Drake-sounding feel to it. The next track, 'On My Level', instantly sounds like the down-tempo tracks found in his previous mixtapes, and is probably the only track on this album that actually sounds like what I expected would be on this album. The production is minimalistic and sounds like a traditional rap song, and is probably the song that actually sounds like true 'rap' rather than a crossover track. 'Black and Yellow' has great production from Stargate, a great chorus and a catchy melody. The beat is good too. However, I don't consider it real 'hip-hop'. Stargate make great pop music, but when they produce hip-hop songs (for example, Rihanna's What's My Name) it turns out to be more closer to 'hip-pop'.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Well i got this from the strenth of khalifa's mixtapes that i have heard. I put it off for a while but after one listen i knew i would be playing this over and over,yep it is commercial (very) but hey whats wrong with wanting a shot at chart topping.Some tracks are same subject matter but i like khalifa a lot to put up with it, mac and devin is a good cop also, having grown up with snoop from his dubt classic. Catchy songs and diffrent from his mixtapes. peace
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Format: Audio CD
Wiz Khalifa's mixtapes are one of the best in modern hiphop(Have a listen to "Kush and orange juice).This is why a debut studio album has all the reasons to have such hype.Having said that the hype is well deserved after having listened to it. The songs are entertaining/funny not lacking wordplay.
The only beef I have with the record is too much of him singing. But tracks like "When am gone" and "Hopes and dreams" make up for the singing with lyricism and depth.
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Format: Audio CD
Liked Black and yellow so read a couple of reviews on this album and bought it on the back of them. I expected it to be a rap album as i hadn't heard much of his other stuff... i wouldn't consider this a rap/hip hop album more a R&B pop album. Full of catchy hooks and production that you would not necessarily associate with rap/hiphop. Some of the rhymes are awkward and not put together well even lazy and he seems to rap about nothing. It was a struggle to listen to the second half of the album as it gets progressively poppy as the tracks go on. Will learn from this mistake and give artists I'm not too familiar with more listening time before buying their album in future.
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