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Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
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Road to Perdition Paperback – 23 Aug 2002

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Paperback, 23 Aug 2002
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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd (23 Aug. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840235349
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840235340
  • Product Dimensions: 19.8 x 14 x 2.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 382,728 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

...beautifully rendered characterisation...You can just see what got Sam Mendes so excited... -- BookMunch 31st July 2002

...the story...stands proudly as a rip-roaring melodrama thats filled to the brim with fascinating incidents. -- Aint it Cool News 23 July 2002


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Now that Max Collins' original graphic novel has been transformed into Sam Mendes' oscar-favourite movie, one would assume that many of those who appreciated the film might look into its origins and take a gander at this, the story's first birth. Drawn by Richard Piers Rayner, whose devotion to authentic 1930s detail meant it took four years to draw, the novel, like its film counterpart, tells the story of Michael 'O''Sullivan, a hitman living in the Tri-Cities, whose wife and younger son are murdered by his employer's unstable offspring, Connor. Mike and his elder son Michael Jr. go on the run, trying to reach Perdition, Kansas, while the safety of Michael Jr. becomes more and more arduous.
While most of the elements seen in the film are intact, with Tom Hanks deftly (and somewhat surprisingly) carrying the role of the mass-murdering anti-hero, there are key differences. Max Collins based much of his story on actual events in the 1930 Midwest. However, the film removes Elliot Ness, one of O'Sullivan's few allies (who seems pretty handy with a tommy-gun), but adds Jude Law's character Maguire, the rival hitman-cum-journalist.
Max Allan Collins really does tug at the heart-strings in this novel, and the tragic death of Peter, drawn so adoringly by Rayner, is reminiscent of many of the bitter-sweet moments in 'Jimmy Corrigan', while the ensuing butchering of a group of ex-employer John Looney's cronies with a certain sharp, silent object is morbidly satisfying. The father-son story bares comparison to Japan's 'Lone Wolf and Cub' series, as do the two books' beautiful black and white art. 'Road to Perdition' stands on its own two, very American feet.
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My son had to read this and was not looking forward to it. However he was very chuffed when it arrived and he discovered that it was written in cartoon form. Just like an old fashioned manga book. Speech bubbles and everything. He read it in two days over the summer holidays and couldn't have been happier. This book was not new but was still in good nick and for a compulsory school book who's complaining.
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I cannot really remember the film but I'm sure there are quite a few differences to this graphic novel.
Apparently the fantastic artwork took 4 years to draw. I can see why. Not sure if an updated, colour version would work but I'd like to see it tried.
Great story. This was based on the manga story Lone Wolf and Cub, I believe. I've got the follow up RTP 2 and Return to Perdition (there are 3 in total, one set in the 70's). Looking forward to reading them.
Paradox press do a 2 volume pocket sized book called The Project about poverty, gangs and drugs. Reading that at the moment. It's very reminiscent of The Wire and The Corner by David Simon. Worth a look.
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Format: Paperback
A tale of revenge in the gangsters world of the 1930's America .An Irish gang turning against their own hitman - for an unconvincig reason- they fail to kill him ,but manage to kill his wife and one of his tow boys, so the hitman vows revenge ,taking with him his adolescent son , on a bloody road to perdition.
About the story. Max allan Collins wrote in his introduction that he wanted to write the American version of kazou koike's lone wolf and cub, well , he did manage to make it violent , but failed to keep a strong story line . it developed abruptly, and why would a gang try to kill their best hitman , just because the hitman's son saw his father and the boss's son kill another criminal,he's just a little boy .
About the art .Richard Piers Rayner depiction of the 1930's America , and the gunfights scenes , are good, but his unsettling drawing of the main character's faces distanced me from fully enjoying his work .
Did other readers notice how o'sullivan face looked like famous actors from classic films .check out John Garfield , page 124 , panel 3 . James Dean , page 125 , panel 4 . Marlon Brando , page 126 , panel 2 . Kirk Douglas , page 127 , panel 4 , and James Cagney , page 252 , panel 3.

But don't worry .if you liked the film , you'll like the book .
no jude law's character in the book.

if You want a great father and son quest for revenge tale , pick up lone wolf and cub.
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