FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 8 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Road Past Mandalay (C... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Road Past Mandalay (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) Paperback – 26 Apr 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£6.84
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£4.66 £2.66
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 8 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Road Past Mandalay (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS)
  • +
  • Bugles and a Tiger: My Life in the Gurkhas (Cassell Military Paperbacks)
  • +
  • Quartered Safe Out Here
Total price: £27.96
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; New Ed edition (26 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0304361577
  • ISBN-13: 978-0304361571
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 201,908 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

The second part of the bestselling novelist's autobiography about his time in the Gurkhas during the second world war

About the Author

John Masters was commissioned into the Gurkha Rifles on the eve of the Second World War and rose to command one of the Chindit columns fighting behind the lines against the Japanese in Burma. He left the Army after the war to pursue a very profitable career as a novelist.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 7 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
Whilst this book lets the reader into the personal life of John Masters, it also provides an understanding of what it feels like to command a large body of troops. The story begins, interestingly, in a theatre of war not often discussed: the fighting in the area of Syria and Iraq against the Vichy French and ending with an advance right up to the border with Turkey. The bulk of the book, however, covers Masters�s experience with the Chindits in Burma and how through the death of Ord Wingate he unexpectedly, and at a relatively young age, ends up commanding a brigade. There are brief insights into the well known commanders of the time including Slim and Stilwell. What comes through well in this book is how a commander has to make decisions and how Masters reacts to various situations to maintain morale of his men and keep his brigade a unified, cohesive unit. These range from refusing to accept a blanket from a sergeant during a monsoon, to giving the order to shoot the badly wounded rather than leave them to the Japanese � and having to look each wounded man in the eye knowing that he will have to give that order. No only is this book a thoroughly good read it could well be of use to modern managers as a lesson in decision making. It also tells of Masters�s personal life and his love of India; there is a feeling when finishing this book of being given the privilege of sharing in a part someone�s life.
Comment 51 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
John Masters is a fantastic writer, as shown by his post-war career. But here he concentrates on his wartime experiences, and brings them to life as well as any of his novels. Although he details his other employment the book concentrates on the famous Second Chindit operation, which he began as brigade major of 111th Brigade. But following the death of Wingate and the promotion of the brigade commander, 'Joe' Lentaigne, to take over, Masters was appointed to command the brigade.

With Wingate dead the Chindits found themselves supporting the American-Chinese forces under 'Vinegar Joe' Stilwell, a noted Anglophobe - indeed, misanthrope - who told Lentaigne the Chindits were a 'bunch of lily-livered Limey popinjays'. He then fought them until they were so exhausted that to Masters everyone seemed to move like sleepwalkers in slow motion. 'A Cameronian lieutenant fell headfirst into a weapon pit and two Japanese soldiers five yards away leaned weakly on their rifles and laughed, slowly, while the officer struggled to his feet, slowly, and trudged up the slope the shells fell slowly and burst with long slow detonations and the men collapsed slowly to the ground, blood flowing in gentle gouts into the mud.'

Finally, after a bitter series of signals, Masters' demand for medical examination of 111th Brigade was agreed to. Over three days all the remaining 2,200 men were examined, of whom those judged fit for service in any theatre amounted to 118. Masters added his own name to the list and

asked, with bitter sarcasm, for orders from Stilwell for the remainder of his brigade. Stilwell sent them: 111th Company, as he now called it, would guard a Chinese artillery battery.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a fantastic read. Well above average for miliary memoirs, I think it is better even than John Masters' earlier 'Bugles and a Tiger' because it is faster moving and deals with bigger themes. It tells the story of John Masters' own action-packed world war two career; Iraq, Vichy Syria, Staff College, the Chindits and finally the re-taking of Mandalay. The ingenuity, scale - and the suffering - of the second Chindit expedition inevitably form the lion's share of this 330 page book but there are also interludes for Masters' love both for Barbara Rose and for the mountains of India. Many people emerge as heroes from Masters' direct and surprisingly moving account; his Chindit brigade medical officer, a young Gurkha officer, a dependable, intelligent mule and Major (Acting Brigadier) John Masters himself.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It's an easy read and Master's style is informal and personal, like he's writing to a friend.

The book opens surprisingly, a long, long ways from Burma, Imphal, Blackpool or Rees's 19th Division. They're in the Middle East under the command of William Slim of the 10th Indian Division. If any of you have read Slim's Unofficial History you'll quickly recognize two of the incidents from Slim's book repeated in Master's Road Past Mandalay. The two incidents are immediately recognizable (think Deir-es-Zor and the Pai-Tak Pass), and its interesting to read about the two actions; once from Slim's perspective, then from Master's point of view.

This is one of the few books written by "one who was there." Think Swinson's Kohima, Evan's Imphal or Slim's Defeat Into Victory. Like Slim's errors at Kohima and Imphal, Masters allowed himself to be backed into Blackpool on the second Chindit expedition after Joe Lentaign (111th Indian Infantry Brigade) was promoted to replace Orde Wingate. Blackpool was a travesty and its refreshing to read an author take responsibility for his actions instead of blaming Stilwell, Slim or Lentaign.

What drew my attention to Road Past Mandalay is how many other authors (Allen, Lattimer, Edwards, Keane) reference this title in their bibliographies.

The book is more then Master's time in the Chindits in 1944. In the book he describes being assigned to staff college at Quetta. Because of this assignment to the Quetta staff collge, he missed the opportunity to be surrounded, killed or captured by Rommel's Afrika Corps in the Cauldron battles prior to El Alamein.

He also takes the time to describe life in India before and during World War II when it was still part of the British Raj.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback