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Rites of Passage (Penguin/Faber Audiobooks)

4.2 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Penguin Audiobooks; Abridged Ed edition (29 Aug. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140863958
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140863956
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,108,044 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Book Description

Rites of Passage, from William Golding - the author of Lord of the Flies - the Booker Prize-winning novel and first instalment from the Sea Trilogy. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

William Golding (1911-93) was born in Cornwall, England. His first novel, Lord of the Flies, was published in 1954 and became an international bestseller. In 1983, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
William Golding's Booker Prize Winner 'Rites of Passage' is presented in the form of a journal written by Edmund Talbot, a young gentleman travelling on board a ship from England to Australia during the Napoleonic Wars. Talbot, writing the journal for the enjoyment of his titled godfather, begins his account fairly benignly with descriptions of his fellow passengers and members of the crew. Amongst the passengers Talbot describes, there is Reverend Robert James Colley, a young clergyman intent on behaving as a man of the cloth should, despite a lack of good Christian followers; there is Wilmot Brocklebank, an artist, who is travelling with his so-called wife and daughter, neither of whom are what they initially appear to be; and there is Miss Granham, a governess, who is pleasant in appearance but past her first flush of youth. Amongst the crew we meet Captain Anderson, a bully who has an intense disliking for clergymen, and his subordinates: Mr Deverel, a gentleman officer who doesn't always behave like one, and Mr Summers, a man from the lower ranks who has worked his way up and does his best to behave in a gentlemanly manner. At first, not a huge amount happens; the reader is entertained, or otherwise, by Talbot's observations of his fellow travellers, and we are invited to mock the clownish antics of the Reverend Colley, and then things move up a pace when Talbot becomes intimately involved with a female passenger, who seems to be sharing her favours with others. However, as the story progresses and the terrible on-board experiences of Reverend Colley are gradually revealed to the reader, we begin to see the darker underbelly to this story of bullying, degradation, humiliation and shame.Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A classic that had me hooked very quickly.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
excellent
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Format: Paperback
I read this in one sitting, wanting to know what had happened!
The novel is narrated by a somewhat arrogant young man en route to Australia in 1800. He keeps a journal intended for his godfather- Golding's style of writing convinces the reader that this was written be a gentleman of the era- full at first with nautical observations and accounts of his seasickness. Soon we meet his fellow passengers, notably a rather comical young clergyman and the fiercesome captain. And we become aware that the former is being cruelly bullied...
Our narrator then comes into possession of a long letter that the clergyman is writing to his sister back in England and reproduces it, noting 'this journal has become deadly as a loaded gun.'
We have two different perspectives on the same events, but there is a further twist...
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Format: Paperback
Rites Of Passage was my favourite book at school. I won't spoil it for you by telling you what happens but it is ribald, dirty, cantankerous and rude. A must.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book when it was first published and have since revisited it a couple of times. It is a wonderfully imagined account of a sea voyage to Australia at the time of Napoleonic Wars. The very mixed group of emigrants experience conditions aboard which are completely convincing - cramped, unpleasant, smelly and highly dangerous - with an equally covincing hierarchy of naval personnel. Everyone is interesting, everyone is fully characterised. Mostly it is seen through the eyes of young Mr. Talbot, who is on his way to make a distinguished career in the colonies.

He has nothing but contempt for the apparently ridiculous clergyman, Colley, but in that he sadly mistaken, as he discovers when he finds and reads Colley's journal, and it is in Colley that the tragedy in the book lies. This is a most original book written by a very great novelist, and it deals as always with Golding with the great theme of good and evil revealed through the characters, their attitudes and how they behave. It won the Booker prize and was a very worthy winner. It is just as powerful today as it was then.
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Format: Paperback
The year is 1814, when an old frigate sets sail from England, destined for Australia. Its captain is the gruff Anderson who has a short temper and rather roars than speaks. Aboard his ship is a motley crew: Mr. Brocklebank (a painter, given to drink) accompanied by his wife and daughter, the radical Mr. Prettiman, the staunch governess Miss Granham, ... and one Edmund Talbot who is godson to an English peer and on his way to join the staff of the governor of Australia. It is through Talbot's journal, kept for the benefit of his godfather, that we get the chronicle of this luckless ship.

The parson Mr. Colley, one of the other passengers, is what Trollope would call a 'hobbledehoy', and he soon becomes the object of ridicule among the other passengers and the ship's sailors. The consequences, ultimately, are tragical. Mr. Colley, one could say, fails to pass his rites of passage.

Until recently Golding was to me simply the author of 'Lord of the Flies', and having read that I foolishly assumed that he had written nothing else worthwhile reading. I readily grant now that I couldn't have been more mistaken. 'Rites of passage' is a truly marvelous novel in several respects. In the same way as with the island in 'Lord of the Flies', the ship in this book is a microcosm, reflecting and magnifying, as on a stage, the morals of society (and not just early 19th society). Though on the surface everyone aboard is polite, and the book abounds in farcical and ludicrous scenes, the tragic fate of Mr. Colley reveals the deeply embedded hypocrisy of each and every passenger.

Talbot himself too, however unwillingly, has to pass his own rites of passage in coming to terms with his behaviour towards Mr.
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