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The Rising Of The Moon (VMC) Paperback – 14 Nov 1996

4.3 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Virago; New Ed edition (14 Nov. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1860490743
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860490743
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 1.5 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 474,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

** 'A delightfully subversive read. (Liza Cody)

** 'Her tour-de-force. (Philip Larkin)

About the Author

Gladys Mitchell died in 1983 after a career as a teacher and writer. Her first novel appeared in 1929. She was awarded the CWA Silver Dagger in 1976.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 27 Feb. 2000
Format: Paperback
Philip Larkin and Patricia Craig both considered THE RISING OF THE MOON to be Gladys Mitchell's best novel. It is a unique tour de force, and one of the best serial killer stories ever written - it ranks with Christie's ABC MURDERS, if not surpassing it. The sleepy Thames-side town of Brentford is evoked memorably, and seen as a place of adventure and mystery, with murder acting as a dangerous game in the fairy-tale world that is life as seen through the eyes of the two boy heroes at the centre of the book: Simon and Keith Innes. Mrs. Bradley, Miss Mitchell's eldritch psychologist detective (a wicked witch who murders people), takes a back place for once - but the story can survive without her for once. As always with Mitchell, the characters and place are both REAL - believable dialogue against believable places. The murderer is not well-hidden - but s/he is not meant to be - the adventure in this one is more important than the detection. Despite this fact, the plot is good and tense - atmospheric and fun.
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It was the BBC Series that introduced me to Mrs. Bradley and her strong, silent type of a chauffeur. The Rising of the Moon is written from the point of view of two adventurous schoolboys and it takes a while to work out where Mrs. Bradley's going to fit in, but so she does, although without the light flirting that the BBC kindly adds for us. Here we have a serial killer, tracked by the boys who are determined to prove their older brother's innocence and almost get their throats cut a few times along the way. It's an exciting tale of plucky young chaps that could almost have been written for schoolboys to read, but it's just a little too gruesome, with enough suspense to give everyone nightmares.
When seemingly innocent young girls are being seen off on a regular basis, the whole town (not called Brentford, but that's where it was set) starts to panic, speculate and point fingers. There's a troubled marriage, some inappropriate relationships and a whole circus thrown in to give us enough red herrings to feed a football team. Mitchell's writing flows beautifully, building up then calming us down again over and over, before the nail-biting finish. It also gives us a great insight into everyday life of inter-war Middlesex. Do get your hands on a copy.
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Format: Paperback
Great Mrs Bradley mystery - written from perspective of two boys both great characters you enjoy being with and Mrs Bradley gradually moves into the scene and takes you to the gruesome denouement. Gladys Mitchell is a great 20th Century English detective novelist: simple, effective writing, a provocative detective and great set of characters. It's a shame that more of her novels aren't in print at the moment.
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Format: Paperback
When a murder occurs at an Easter circus, 11 year old Keith observes to his 13 your old brother "I'm not at all sure this isn't better, in a way, than the circus. After all, the circus only lasts one afternoon, and it's an awful sweat to get in unless you pay. This murder might last us all the holidays."
But the murder is just the first in a series of knife killings in the 1930s town of Brentford. Left largely to their own devices, the boys take to creeping out at night sleuthing by moonlight. But who could it be: the rag and bone man? their elderly friend and antique dealer, Mrs Cockerton? their elder brother (and guardian) Jack? or is Jack protecting his friend Danny?
And will their lovely lodger Christina remain safe?
When eccentric home office psychologist Mrs Bradbury is drafted in to help with the case, she and the boys liaise to catch the killer.
Quite an engaging if improbable read, set in the world of yesteryear.
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Format: Hardcover
Out on their Easter holiday, brothers Simon and Keith Innes, thirteen and eleven respectively, decide, on a lark, to sneak into a circus that has set-up in the neighborhood for the holiday. To sneak into it they have to travel across Dead Man's Bridge to get to a hole in a fence that borders the circus and Mr. Taylor's field. As they approach the bridge they see a silhouette, and that silhouette has a large and shiny knife. Their night is to end in disappointment, because when they decide to follow the shadowy figure, they inexplicably lose it, and then they are caught breaking into the circus. Frustrated, they go home only to find out the next day that a circus worker has been viciously slain by what will be called "The Ripper", and they may have seen the murderer.

Being the intrepid and industrious lads that they are, they decide to investigate the crime on their own during their time off. They are however hampered by the fact that they are orphans living with their older brother Jack, his wife June, Jack and June's three-year-old son Tom, and their beautiful lodger, the factory girl Christina. A woman with whom both Simon and Keith are in love with, and whom June hates.

A circus performer is arrested, and the circus leaves town. Then there is another murder of another young lass while the circus performer is in custody. Unfortunately, as the story rolls along, it seems unthinkable, but inevitable, that Jack may be involved in the murders. After all, why did he arrive home after a murder all muddy and wet, and where did that big knife of his go that he used to have? Jack says that he lost it, but did he? The boys are in a quandary, and due to circumstances that they feel that they are caught in, they will go on to make a mistake that will only make things worse.
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