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The Rising Hardcover – 2 Apr 2010

4.2 out of 5 stars 86 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan (2 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 023070137X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230701373
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 17.1 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 920,895 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"With "The Rising, "McGilloway announces himself as one of the most exciting crime novelists around: gripping, heartbreaking and always surprising. . ." -HousingWire.com --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

'Set to become one of the great series in modern crime fiction' - John Connolly --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Rising is a very good police procedural set in rural Ireland; specifically the north-west of the Republic on the border with the North. Location is vital as the influence of the Troubles hangs heavy over this story. Are paramilitaries behind the vigilante group; or the "community activism"? What are their motives? Have they really reformed or are they simply driving out the opposition so that they have the drugs business to themselves?

This is the morass that a fairly ordinary man, Inspector Benedict Devlin has to deal with. He investigates the death of a local drug dealer which might be linked to the vigilantes. The attraction of Devlin is that he is so ordinary. He is not the maverick loaner, nor is there for him the drink or drugs problem or womanising. Instead he faces problems with his children and feels guilty about not valuing his wife enough and his work gets in the way of his personal life.

There is a very good yarn here. There are twists and turns aplenty, but they are all believable. More to the point, the detection done by Devlin is clever and astute without him becoming some kind of super hero. The feel of the narrative and characterisation is similar to Peter Robinson's "Banks" series, although it has to be conceded that Brian McGilloway is not quite in that class.

The Rising is an accomplished story with a very good central character and good supporting cast which will be enjoyed by any fan of good police procedurals.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I have only just recently started getting more into `detective' stories, as I have never been a big fan of them. However tastes change with time, and I am glad mine has, as I have now found Brian McGilloway's creation of Inspector Devlin.

This reminds me very much of the Graham Hurley novels, and that they obviously have recurring themes, characters and places within them, set in around the Garda in Ireland, very near the border if the North. This I found having picked the series up in book 4, but it does not detract from the story.

Inspector Devlin is called out to a burning barn, where the subsequent discovery of a dead body turns out to be a drug dealer. Devlin now becomes involved the drug problems of the area, and has to also confront others who are dealing with the drug problems in local communities - the so called 'The Rising'. More bodies connected with the world of drugs are discovered, and Devlin realises that there is more to the whole problem of the first body discovered in the barn, and that perhaps some people closer to home are involved. However the truth is not always the right answer.

Devlin has a family, a wife and two children, and as readers we see him try and juggle this with his detective work, and the pain it causes when his daughter shows she is growing up and wants to go her own way. This leads to pain for the family, and at times I felt like shaking Devlin and telling him to concentrate on his family which seems to be slowly falling apart.

The story is a believable one, and there is nothing in it that I found stretched the events of real life anyway. The whole story and plot is kept very real and very in the 'here and now'.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Once again Brian McGilloway has come up trumps with the latest Inspector Devlin novel. This has the usual multi-stranded plot lines which Ben works his way through whilst his private life appears to be unravelling. I felt that his boss Harry Patterson was more believable than in the previous book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Really enjoying the Inspector Devlin stories. I like him as a character and I like the way in which the books are written. Already have next downloaded. Hope Brian McGilloway writes a few more so that I can take them with me on holiday!!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great book well written that gets you really involved in the main characters and just for once the main character isn't some amazing detective that is socially and emotionally flawed. He makes mistakes that have serious consequences much like we all do and its all the more believable for it. I love the fact its set on the Northern and Southern Irish border and you always feel the Irish/Anglo conflict is a tiny scratch away from the surface.
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By Clare O'Beara TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 Jan. 2016
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a dark and gritty look at policing in the shadow of the border. Modern Ireland sees co-operations between forces on both sides, but drug dealers try to oust rivals a few miles away whichever side of the border they happen to live in and the roads are less checked than in previous times. The Garda inspector who narrates is based in Lifford and calls in to Letterkenny, with the Atlantic on one side and the lights of Derry on the other.

A first person narrative for a police procedural is unusual and produces only that person's viewpoint of the case and suspects. However we do get Devlin's experience of running into a burning barn to search for people told with strong and simple realism. Devlin also seems to take what he sees at face value, not wonder why a kid is camping in February or why a daughter aged eleven is interested in boys (I wasn't at that age). Speculation is left to the reader while Devlin just knows what procedure requires, like dental records and notifying family of a presumed fire victim. The work of the Drugs Squad necessarily involves junkies, squats and squalor. There's also storms and flooding in the countryside we explore. Expect strong language. Devlin's relationship with his wife Penny is strongly tested and we remain in suspense until the last.

The name The Rising refers to a rising up against drug dealers by an infuriated populace. We do have to think that the title was chosen with the centenary of the Easter Rising in mind. Few words are wasted in this crime tale. If you have been following the series to date, or particularly enjoy terse, gritty procedurals, you may give it a better rating.
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