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The Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America (Sociology) by [Loe, Meika]
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The Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America (Sociology) Kindle Edition

2.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Review

"This book is immensely readable and highly accesible to a nonscientific audience. The Rise of Viagra adds a valuable sociological perspective to the public discourse on sexuality, technology, and sexual performance--a dialogue that the drug itself helped to create."

"Meika Loe's book tells the story of Viagra with skill and verve. She brings to that tale a sharp eye, a fine ear, and just the right degree of irony."
-, - Daniel Callahan, author of What Price Better Health: Hazards of the Research Imperative

"A fine piece of contemporary history. The Rise of Viagra paints a thoughtful portrait, letting the reader decide whether the Viagra phenomenon is ultimately to be celebrated or rued."
-, - Katharine Greider, author of The Big Fix: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers

"The book is not a polemic but a deep and thoughtful examination of derivative problems not anticipated by Viagra's aggressive marketers. It is especially effective when placing the campaign to promote Viagra (a trade name) in the greater context of the medicalization of modern health care." - "Choice"

"[An] engaging account and trenchant critique of the powerful blue pill. Based on extensive research, and written with clarity, grace, and wit, The Rise of Viagra chronicles an incredible intertwining of bodies, pleasures, marketing savvy, and the undying quest for the medical fix."
-, - Steven Epstein, author of Impure Science: AIDS, Activism, and the Politics of Knowledge

"Meika Loe's core argument is that the unprecedented success of Viagra in America is not the result of an exciting scientific breakthrough bringing relief to the desperate or the dying. Rather, commercial interests have created a socially desirable but medically limited product-ironically, by denying the fundamentally social nature of sex. . . . The central argument gains pace throughout the book, becoming increasingly compelling as the ominous implications of Viagra for American society unfold." - "The New England Journal of Medicine"

(

"The book is not a polemic but a deep and thoughtful examination of derivative problems not anticipated by Viagra's aggressive marketers. It is especially effective when placing the campaign to promote Viagra (a trade name) in the greater context of the medicalization of modern health care."
)-("Choice"), ()

(

"Meika Loe's book tells the story of Viagra with skill and verve. She brings to that tale a sharp eye, a fine ear, and just the right degree of irony."
)-(Daniel Callahan), (author of "What Price Better Health: Hazards of the Research Imperative")

(

"A fine piece of contemporary history. "The Rise of Viagra" paints a thoughtful portrait, letting the reader decide whether the Viagra phenomenon is ultimately to be celebrated or rued."
)-(Katharine Greider), (author of "The Big Fix: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers")

(

"[An] engaging account and trenchant critique of the powerful blue pill. Based on extensive research, and written with clarity, grace, and wit, "The Rise of Viagra" chronicles an incredible intertwining of bodies, pleasures, marketing savvy, and the undying quest for the medical fix."
)-(Steven Epstein), (author of "Impure Science: AIDS, Activism, and the Politics of Knowledge")

(

"Meika Loe's core argument is that the unprecedented success of Viagra in America is not the result of an exciting scientific breakthrough bringing relief to the desperate or the dying. Rather, commercial interests have created a socially desirable but medically limited product-ironically, by denying the fundamentally social nature of sex. . . . The central argument gains pace throughout the book, becoming increasingly compelling as the ominous implications of Viagra for American society unfold."
)-("The New England Journal of Medicine"), ()

"A fine piece of contemporary history. "The Rise of Viagra" paints a thoughtful portrait, letting the reader decide whether the Viagra phenomenon is ultimately to be celebrated or rued."
-Katharine Greider, author of "The Big Fix: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers"

"Meika Loe's book tells the story of Viagra with skill and verve. She brings to that tale a sharp eye, a fine ear, and just the right degree of irony."
-Daniel Callahan, author of "What Price Better Health: Hazards of the Research Imperative"

"[An] engaging account and trenchant critique of the powerful blue pill. Based on extensive research, and written with clarity, grace, and wit, "The Rise of Viagra" chronicles an incredible intertwining of bodies, pleasures, marketing savvy, and the undying quest for the medical fix."
-Steven Epstein, author of "Impure Science: AIDS, Activism, and the Politics of Knowledge"

"The book is not a polemic but a deep and thoughtful examination of derivative problems not anticipated by Viagra's aggressive marketers. It is especially effective when placing the campaign to promote Viagra (a trade name) in the greater context of the medicalization of modern health care."
-"Choice",

"Meika Loe's core argument is that the unprecedented success of Viagra in America is not the result of an exciting scientific breakthrough bringing relief to the desperate or the dying. Rather, commercial interests have created a socially desirable but medically limited product-ironically, by denying the fundamentally social nature of sex. . . . The central argument gains pace throughout the book, becoming increasingly compelling as the ominous implications of Viagra for American society unfold."
-"The New England Journal of Medicine",

"The book is not a polemic but a deep and thoughtful examination of derivative problems not anticipated by Viagra's aggressive marketers. It is especially effective when placing the campaign to promote Viagra (a trade name) in the greater context of the medicalization of modern health care."
-"Choice"

"Meika Loe's core argument is that the unprecedented success of Viagra in America is not the result of an exciting scientific breakthrough bringing relief to the desperate or the dying. Rather, commercial interests have created a socially desirable but medically limited product-ironically, by denying the fundamentally social nature of sex. . . . The central argument gains pace throughout the book, becoming increasingly compelling as the ominous implications of Viagra for American society unfold."
-"The New England Journal of Medicine"

[An] engaging account and trenchant critique of the powerful blue pill. Based on extensive research, and written with clarity, grace, and wit, "The Rise of Viagra" chronicles an incredible intertwining of bodies, pleasures, marketing savvy, and the undying quest for the medical fix.
-Steven Epstein, author of "Impure Science: AIDS, Activism, and the Politics of Knowledge""

Meika Loe s book tells the story of Viagra with skill and verve. She brings to that tale a sharp eye, a fine ear, and just the right degree of irony.
-Daniel Callahan, author of "What Price Better Health: Hazards of the Research Imperative""

The book is not a polemic but a deep and thoughtful examination of derivative problems not anticipated by Viagra s aggressive marketers. It is especially effective when placing the campaign to promote Viagra (a trade name) in the greater context of the medicalization of modern health care.
-"Choice""

A fine piece of contemporary history. "The Rise of Viagra" paints a thoughtful portrait, letting the reader decide whether the Viagra phenomenon is ultimately to be celebrated or rued.
-Katharine Greider, author of "The Big Fix: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers""

Meika Loe's core argument is that the unprecedented success of Viagra in America is not the result of an exciting scientific breakthrough bringing relief to the desperate or the dying. Rather, commercial interests have created a socially desirable but medically limited product-ironically, by denying the fundamentally social nature of sex. . . . The central argument gains pace throughout the book, becoming increasingly compelling as the ominous implications of Viagra for American society unfold.
-"The New England Journal of Medicine""

Review

“The book is not a polemic but a deep and thoughtful examination of derivative problems not anticipated by Viagra’s aggressive marketers. It is especially effective when placing the campaign to promote Viagra (a trade name) in the greater context of the medicalization of modern health care.”

-Choice

“Meika Loe's core argument is that the unprecedented success of Viagra in America is not the result of an exciting scientific breakthrough bringing relief to the desperate or the dying. Rather, commercial interests have created a socially desirable but medically limited product-ironically, by denying the fundamentally social nature of sex. . . . The central argument gains pace throughout the book, becoming increasingly compelling as the ominous implications of Viagra for American society unfold.”

-The New England Journal of Medicine



“A fine piece of contemporary history. The Rise of Viagra paints a thoughtful portrait, letting the reader decide whether the Viagra phenomenon is ultimately to be celebrated or rued.”

-Katharine Greider,author of The Big Fix: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers



“[An] engaging account and trenchant critique of the powerful blue pill. Based on extensive research, and written with clarity, grace, and wit, The Rise of Viagra chronicles an incredible intertwining of bodies, pleasures, marketing savvy, and the undying quest for the medical fix.”

-Steven Epstein,author of Impure Science: AIDS, Activism, and the Politics of Knowledge



“Meika Loe’s book tells the story of Viagra with skill and verve. She brings to that tale a sharp eye, a fine ear, and just the right degree of irony.”

-Daniel Callahan,author of What Price Better Health: Hazards of the Research Imperative


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4771 KB
  • Print Length: 302 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press (11 Aug. 2004)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0049B29QY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #997,694 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
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not coming this pack why they leatdelivery
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I could have got the same information of google
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars 5 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 21 April 2017
By Gregory Kapatak Jr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Little Blue Pill: Problem or Miracle 8 May 2008
By Frederick S. Goethel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The subject of the book is, of course, the story of the little blue pill and how it changed sexuality and medicine in the United States. Written by a sociologist, the book looks at the pill and its effects from a sociological standpoint.

The author starts the book with a relatively short history of the medicine and the disease process it is designed to cure. This is followed by a look at how this has been received by men and by women. Finally, the author looks at the medical industries attempts to find a drug to "fix" FSD syndrome.

The author seems to have a problem with the creation of the drug. Her attitude seems to indicate disgust with the major pharmaceutical houses that are "curing" a disease that the author does not view as a disease, but rather as a social condition. While recreational use of the pill is unwarranted and a problem, the author believes erectile dysfunction is nothing but a fancy name for impotence and that it is a natural part of the aging process. While delving into the history of impotence, and some of the attempted cures along the way, the author misses one big point. Life expectancy 50 years ago was much lower than today, and it wasn't uncommon for men to die in their 50s and 60s. With men living longer, they expect to be able to enjoy relations well past their 50s, which the author sees as a problem.

I would say that I agreed with about 50 percent of the content of the book. Her interviews with men certainly didn't reflect my attitudes towards the issue and I doubt they would reflect a majority of men.

The writing is scholarly and, at times, difficult to wade through. That makes this a book for those who need to read it or a willing to read through a rather heavy tome. If you are looking for a quick, light book on the subject, this isn't it.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What the little blue pill turned into!! 8 April 2014
By Ter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has shed a whole new light what the unintended consequence of this ED solution turned into! Wife be ware!!!
2.0 out of 5 stars VERY BAD SOCIOLOGY - DATA AND CONCLUSIONS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER 1 April 2017
By H. Vandenburgh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In this badly done book, Loe argues against the preponderance of her own data to suggest we should be chary of Viagra use for ED when most of her respondents seem to think it's a good thing. I realize that postmodernism allows pasting non-sequiturs on data, but this goes way too far to fit itself into a vulgar feminist framework. There's also evidence of confabulation when ONE man in a focus group thinks Viagra is an aphrodisiac, which it most definitely isn't. I gave a talk on this at a New York Sociological Society meeting. The silly left has been trying to be anti-Viagra for years, but there's no good arguments for opposing it. Most women support it.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Case study on Big Pharma's influence over doctors 7 May 2008
By Karen Franklin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Good case study of the enormous influence wielded by BigPharma over modern culture. Loe describes how the application of the medical model turns sex into a commodity, with quality measured by speed of erection, efficiency of ejaculation, and ability to perform on demand and in the absence of relational connection. "Normal" is defined more and more narrowly until any variation becomes a "dysfunction," and such dysfunctions take on epidemic proportions. Meanwhile, men feel more and more pressure to attain the unattainable. Just as Prozac is used to medicate modern angst and stress, Viagra is used to relieve men's insecurity in this age of sexual McDonaldization. The irony is that antidepressants reduce sex drive, so men are more in need of Viagra in order to perform at the level of their (and their partners') increasingly high expectations.

Loe's section on how BigPharma is extending the Viagra model to "Female Sexual Dysfunction" (FSD) is eye-opening. Look for "FSD" in the upcoming Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM V).

Also providing food for thought is the growing emphasis on sex as a purely physical act, ego-centered, non-relational and even alienated from others. When I see this focus in the sex offenders I evaluate, I see it as deviant. But according to Loe, it's market-driven and increasingly normative. Interesting.

I gave it only 4 stars because the writing is somewhat pedantic and jargon-laden, and you have to wade through lengthy and tedious quotations. I wish she'd had the confidence to write more in her own voice.
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