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Right Ho, Jeeves (BBC Audio) Audio CD – Audiobook, 5 Jun 2006

4.6 out of 5 stars 86 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: BBC Physical Audio; New edition edition (5 Jun. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563527994
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563527992
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 63.5 x 15.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 213,278 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

... I was tipping my hat to Jarvis, almost at once, because he contrived to get things babbling along right away -- Vanity Fair, March 2010

Book Description

'You don't analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.' Stephen Fry --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Was there ever an author who created such a stunning array of characters as P.G Wodehouse. In this one of Betram Wooster's finest outings, not only do we have Bertie and Jeeves. We also have Gussie Fink Nottle, Aunt Dahlia, Tuppy Glossop and of course Madeline Bassett. It's a shame that Bingo Little couldn't make it, but you can't have it all.
Ah what's that, I'm straying from the plot...thank you Jeeves, I'll attend to that immediately. The story revolves around Gussie Fink Nottles attempts to woo Madeline. They appear to made for each other. Gussie is an old school friend of Bertie's who now spends his time raising newts in his substantial country pile. Madeline is possibly the world's biggest drip who believes that the stars are God's daisy chain. The book revolves around Bertie, with Jeeves's help machinations to bring the two love birds together. This is complicated by Madeline's belief that is in fact Bertie who loves her.
A hilarious romp from beginning to end, this is one of Wodehouse's finest and remains a joy to read
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the very best Jeeves and Wooster books. I prefer the full, one-story books to the story-a-chapter books, and this one excels. Bertie decides to take over from Jeeves in resolving his friend's love issues, and only succeeds in causing mayhem everywhere, including getting everyone engaged to the wrong people! As always it falls to Jeeves to sort everything right and restore harmony, but on the way to doing so there is so much brilliant writing that you really do not want the book to end. Classic Wodehouse.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is one of my favourite Wodehouse books, everything about it is just about perfect. I first read this book 30 odd years ago and just howled with laughter, since then I've lost count of the number of times I've read it and it's never failed to cheer me up. It's not just that it is hilariously funny in places but it's also beautifully written. Buy this book! At 49p it would a crime not to.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 Aug. 2007
Format: Paperback
If there's one thing Bertie Wooster should never do, it's make elaborate plans to bring estranged lovebirds back together.

And he demonstrates just why in the second full-length Jeeves novel, a screwball disaster saga that sees Bertie confidently trying to fix people's lives. Of course, things go horribly wrong, and Wodehouse's arch, nutty look at what happens next is an absolute gem.

When Aunt Dahlia summons him to Brinkley Court for a prizegiving, Bertie sends his newt-fancying friend Gussie instead -- especially since Gussie is enamoured of a girl staying there, the soppy Madeleine Bassett. But when Bertie hears that his cousin Angela has broken off her engagement to Tuppy Glossop -- and his aunt is in need of money -- he rushes down to assist all his relatives and pals by advising them to feign such sorrow that they're unable to eat.

Unfortunately his plan falls through, and they manages to enrage the cook Anatole to the point where he storms out. Even worse, the prize-giving is a disaster and the wrong people end up engaged -- and pursued by homicidally angry exes. Only Jeeves' formidable brain can somehow save the day -- and Bertie's behind.

P.G. Wodehouse made a pretty good living off of spoofing the upper crust of England, and the subtlely intlligent servants who bail them out. "Right Ho Jeeves" is a prime example of his writing -- some small mistakes rapidly balloon out into a crazy tangled mess, which only an intelligent manservant can rescue Bertie from.

Much of the book's charm comes from its complex plot and series of disasters (such as Tuppy's homicidal rampage).
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Format: Paperback
So off we go to Brinkley Court for more high japes and adventures. Along the way hearts will be sundered, friendships forged in childhood will be momentarily broken and mentally negligible young men will make complete fools out of themselves. If you're already aware of the books but can't quite determine which one this is (after all, they do share very similar plots), then this is the episode with Gussie Fink-Nottle dressed as the devil and Bertie making an eighteen mile round trip on an old bicycle to rescue a key which was in Jeeves's pocket all along.

The interesting thing with these stories is how Wodehouse gets around the Superman problem. Of course the main flaw with any Superman story is that he is so much more powerful than anyone else; so invulnerable to attack, that every villain on the planet has to get access to kryptonite to make a dent on him. (Now, one would think that was a rare substance, but no, it seems to be as freely available to the criminal classes as lock-picks.) Wodehouse faces a same issue. Given how smart and assured Jeeves is, given that the man never makes a mistake - how does one eke out a novel worth of material with a central protagonist who can just step in and save the day in an instant? Well the answer is of course young Bertie Wooster. By creating tension between the young master and his valet, by letting Bertie get the idea that Jeeves has somehow lost it, we are treated to over two hundred pages of hilarious thrills and spills as Wooster's advice causes calamity and disaster at every turn. (It would be like a missing Conan Doyle novel, where Watson tells Holmes he's gone off his chump and starts to investigate the murders himself). Of course Jeeves will inevitably step in and save everything at the end, but even when all is resolved it's clearly just at pause until the next set of incredible and hilarious confusions begins.

Comic writing at its absolute best. The Master strikes again.
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