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Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these Internet stock-crazed days, many are looking only to stocks and missing good commercial property opportunities.
There are lots of good questions you can use to help frame your road through the cash flow quadant. At a minimum, you will become much more financially literate. With the help of the 7 steps here for making the necessary changes, you should begin to make the transition.
The book has a nice conversational tone that turns personal economics into common sense examples and principles.
The downside of any book about changing your life is that you can read it much faster than you can master the lessons and apply them. I suggest that you schedule time to reread this book over the next 10 years. That's the best way to check up on yourself and how you are doing.
I do recommend that you read Rich Dad, Poor Dad first. You'll get much more out of this book if you do that. Then you'll begin to see opportunities where others see difficulties. Good luck with fulfilling your goals!
11 comment| 118 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 September 2000
This is no 'get rich quick manual', and is all the better for it - but it will shift the paradigms of what has become, for most of us, the conventional view of work and money. Written in a similar style to the 'one minute manager' series of books is perhaps the only downside of this wonderful volume. The message is essentially simple and illustrated well by examples and diagrams. If you want to become finacially free and actually have your money work for YOU and not the bank, mortgage lender, or tax-man then invest in buying the book and the time to read it. Then begin the journey to financial freedom. The important points are periodically repeated so as to re-affirm the knowledge, which I think is good for any reader at any level. There are 'get out clauses' that allow the reader to finish the book early if they don't think the philosophy will suit them and so not waste their time. I challenge any one to put the book the book down before the last page!
0Comment| 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 August 2004
If you like me have read the first book you might become irritated as I did with the repetition in this sequel. Consequently the reading experience wasn't as enjoyable as Rich Dad Poor Dad 1.
There is however some useful information and new concepts in the second book so on balance it's still worth buying.
0Comment| 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these home-purchasing crazed days, many are looking only to buy homes and missing good commercial property opportunities.
There are lots of good questions you can use to help frame your road through the cash flow quadant. At a minimum, you will become much more financially literate. With the help of the 7 steps here for making the necessary changes, you should begin to make the transition.
The book has a nice conversational tone that turns personal economics into common sense examples and principles.
The downside of any book about changing your life is that you can read it much faster than you can master the lessons and apply them. I suggest that you schedule time to reread this book over the next 10 years. That's the best way to check up on yourself and how you are doing.
I do recommend that you read Rich Dad, Poor Dad first. You'll get much more out of this book if you do that. Then you'll begin to see opportunities where others see difficulties. Good luck with fulfilling your goals!
0Comment| 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 February 2001
A fine book that changes the way you think about money. The text can get a little repetetive at times, but don't let that put you off. There's a lot more meat in this book than in his previous offerring, 'Rich Dad, Poor Dad'.
0Comment| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 October 2001
Like the book before it and the ones following, this book is written in a very simple and repetitive fashion. Often the same quotes and statements are reused just pages apart. However, I believe that's exactly what makes it good, for the simple reason that getting rich is not simple, is a long process, and with no sensible short cuts. It requires a solid foundation based on the right sort of intelligence - and that's what this series of books drums into the reader. Furthermore, the fact that there is simply so much to read (if you read the series), gives you the opportunity to digest all the lessons before leaping into action with too much hast.
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on 5 September 2003
This is a brilliant sequel to Rich Dad Poor Dad. It reinforces the message of the first book and provides alot more specific tips and advice on starting your financial journey. Also most of his advice are not just applicable to your finances but also to the rest of your life if you wish to succeed in other areas. I found this book an enlightening read and I am about to embark on some changes to my life in order that I can acquire more wealth and success. If you want to change your life for the better, buy this book!
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on 9 January 1999
This is a great follow-up to RICH DAD, POOR DAD. CASHFLOW QUADRANT goes into much greater detail and will help you come to a better understanding of why " the rich get richer and the poor get poorer". The concepts are very simple and yet this is the first book that I have read that teaches anyone how to become a business owner or an investor in simple terms that anyone can understand. It is totally new information on the market, not a rehash of hundreds of other books on finances. Mr. Kiyosaki's discussion of the importance of " business systems" as opposed to a great new product or idea is worth the price of the book. I have also had the privilege of hearing him speak on two occasions and would give him 5 stars on his public presentations, as well as his books. If you are frustrated with your financial situation in life after reading lots of self-help and financial books, as I was, I highly recommend CASHFLOW QUADRANT. I believe it will change your life as dramatically as it has changed mine.
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on 23 February 2003
What a great sequel to the original life changing 'Rich Dad Poor Dad'!
'Cashflow Quadrant' goes more into the specifics of becoming wealthy, and, more importantly, which is the best way for YOU to achieve financial freedom. It IS possible, but by no means is this a get rich quick book.
It focuses on the four different business classes of people. Employed, Self-employed, Business owner and Investor. Wealth is achievable in all four quadrants, but the easiest way, unless you are mega-talented, is through the Business Owner or Investor quadrants. I,ll not go too much into it, but I feel I am certainly on the right path now.
Thanks to RK!
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on 18 December 2006
Having enjoyed Rich Dad, Poor Dad in a depressing yet inspiring way, I was anxious to read this book. I was not disappointed, although finished feeling glum yet inspired. It is a strange combination. I suppose it arises from reading about the fate of the employed and self-employed as opposed to the opportunities that beckon those who aspire to run a business or invest.

However, there are seven steps outlined to help the would-be wealthy. These are most interesting and practical. By the end of the book I started to feel a lot better, because as a result of his first book I had already made some progress. Worth reading, but be prepared for some glumness.
0Comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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