Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £7.99

Save £3.00 (27%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Revolutionary Iran: A History of the Islamic Republic by [Axworthy, Michael]
Kindle App Ad

Revolutionary Iran: A History of the Islamic Republic Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£7.99

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review


"This is one of the few must-read books of this year... excellent and insightful from beginning to end." --Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution


"If you were to read only one book on present-day Iran you could not do better than this. Michael Axworthy, a Foreign-Office-expert-turned- academic, has drawn on his own experience as well as archival research to produce a highly readable narrative of the Islamic Republic."--Ervand Abrahamian, Times Higher Education


"Balancing scholarly precision with narrative flair, Mr. Axworthy depicts an Islamic movement that exploited and distorted traditional Shia beliefs in order to seize and hold on to power... scholarly rigor and first-class analysis." --The Economist


"Meticulously fair and scholarly... a very fine work that deserves to be read by anyone interested in the Middle East. Iran is inevitably still central to events in the region and beyond, not just through the potential for war over its nuclear program, nor even because of its continued support for the Assad regime in Syria, but because it is, as Axworthy says, less a country than a continent, more a civilization than a nation." --James Buchan, The Guardian


"Because of [the Iranian] election, Revolutionary Iran, which takes the reader up to the end of 2012, is particularly well-timed. It will be invaluable for those hoping to make sense of the coverage. With it, Axworthy has confirmed his position as one of the most lucid and humane western interpreters of Iran writing at the moment." --The New Statesman


"This book puts much-needed flesh on the simplistic caricature of Iran." --The Times (UK)


"The Shah's imperial folly and overthrow are described grippingly." --The Daily Telegraph


About the Author


Michael Axworthy is Former Head of the Iran Section of the British Foreign Office from 1998-2000. He is currently Senior Lecturer and Director of the Centre for Persian and Iranian Studies at the University of Exeter, and the author of Empire of the Mind: A History of Iran.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 19163 KB
  • Print Length: 492 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (7 Mar. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00ADNP414
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #142,149 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's rare to find a non-fiction book that, like an exciting novel, you use every available moment to grab a few more pages of: but this was one such book for me.
The story of Iran we are told is a complex one: certainly much more complex than some western cliches, but that does not make this book an apologia for the regime - rather we are given insight into why things developed as they did and why plenty of people in Iran who perhaps should have known better made naive mistakes which played into the hands of the hardliners.
Finishing the book I am left with both the sense that it is pointless waiting for the regime to collapse but also that it is clear that it cannot continue for ever in its current form.
Highly recommended if you want to find out more about a country that - if it grasps the opportunities of reform - could still yet be a major player in the coming decades.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book to think about Iran, balanced views all around. The only regret I have is that it could have had some fifty pages more to treat the past ten years in equal depth as it did with the previous periods but on the other hand that would touch on journalism not history as a lot has been declassified since about the earlier times but closer you get the more obscure it gets. To describe the dynamics is well attempted. I felt though that the SEPAH (revolutionary guards) and their role, both origins and near past, were left little under-touched to shed more light on it shaping the Iran's development. The epiloge is bit confusing as it referes to the time further ahead of the publication of itself and doesn't give the date of the paperback amendment, rather unfortunate compromise I think to treat 'current development' of 2013-14 in few sentences in the book on history, as the future can go many ways. Overall I enjoyed the book very much.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By -EFox- VINE VOICE on 16 Sept. 2015
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
After recently reading 'City of Lies: Love, Sex, Death and the Search for Truth in Tehran' by Ramita Navai, I became interested in learning more about the middle east. I feel I was, and very much still am, heavily uneducated about the culture and the current troubles, beyond what the news has said so far. In the first few pages of Revolutionary Iran, and continued further on, it's mentioned about Iran's traditional craft items, poetry, music and other exports - all beautiful things that are often overlooked in countries that only portray to a western world, a personality of war.

I found this deeply interesting, and even more so informative. the timeline of the book follows the deep history, in to the major revolution of the 1970's, through the events that have brought us to today. It's clearly well researched and written without prejudice or obvious opinion. A great book on the subject, a must read if you have an interest,
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Warleybear VINE VOICE on 16 Sept. 2015
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
An extremely interesting, balanced and well paced account of Iranian history from 1979, written by leading expert Micheal Axworthy, former head of the Iranian section for the British Foreign Office. The book explains the political and cultural complexities behind a society, which over the last 30 years, has steered between medieval, modern and extremist views. This account details how through revolution, war and western alienation, Iran once again has managed to resume it’s place as a world player, whilst it struggles internally to integrate the pressures of contemporary outlooks with a hardline Islamic stance. Would highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Middle Eastern affairs or Iran.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
(Disclaimer: the reviewer has no professional experience with Iran and indeed, has never visited that country. Also, "Enqilab" refers to the Islamic Revolution and its institutions.)

This is a brilliantly well-done book which reminds me why I love to study history so much.

The general outline of the book is not surprising: in order to help readers understand the Iranian Revolution as a phase of Iran's extremely long, complex history, Michael Axworthy has to explain, or interpret, the "short" 20th century. During this "short" 20th century (1906-1979), Iranian politics was characterized by popular concern with national development along mainly secular lines. Before this time, Iran was an absolute monarchy with a very weak central government; after this time, Iran had experienced a revolution in which it rejected not only the previous regime, but secular modernity itself (1).

One item worth discussing is whether or not the first chapter is adequate. I believe it is, considering the book's target audience (non-specialists). I've read a few books on this topic, and I think it does one of the best jobs I've seen explaining the prehistory of the Enqilab-e Islami. Axworthy has a severe challenge in so far as, what is perceived to have happened is typically more decisive than what actually did happen (2). His treatment of the events of 1953 are probably as close to perfect as one can ask for; likewise, the Rex Cinema fire (pp.108-109; both events took place exactly 25 years apart) and the 1963 Demonstrations.

Both this book and Axworthy's 2008 book,
...Read more ›
4 Comments 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover