Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item is used and has some wear. Qualifies for free shipping and prime programs.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Revenge of the Whale: The True Story of the Whaleship Essex Paperback – 1 Mar 2004

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£17.12 £0.01
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Hardcover.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 164 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin Books; Reprint edition (Mar. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142400688
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142400685
  • Product Dimensions: 14.3 x 1.3 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 739,476 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"With this masterful adaptation, Philbrick's work fills a void. A compelling saga of desperation and survival."

With this masterful adaptation, Philbrick's work fills a void. A compelling saga of desperation and survival. ("School Library Journal," starred review)

With this masterful adaptation, Philbricks work fills a void. A compelling saga of desperation and survival. ("School Library Journal," starred review)

With this masterful adaptation, Philbrickas work fills a void. A compelling saga of desperation and survival. ("School Library Journal," starred review) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Nathaniel Philbrick is the "New York Times" bestselling author of" Sea of Glory" and" In the Heart of the Sea", for which he won the National Book Award. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What can I say? I started Revenge of the Whale with a little trepidation as these kind of novels usually boggle my brain with umpteen nautical terms and descriptions. Philbrick however, has not fallen into this trap. Where sea faring objects are described very often they are accompanied with a diagram that clearly displays their place on the vessel, this accompanied by a number of photographs and easy to read maps allows the reader to really feel a part of the crew.

The book follows the crew of the Whaleship Essex and how they are attacked by a sperm whale which leads to them escaping in 3 small whaleboats. The lead up to the attack and the actual event only take up the first 3rd of the book, the rest details their constant struggle against the savage sea. Thirst and hunger drive the men to extraordinary lengths including cannibalism. In fact out of the 21 strong crew only 8 survived the journey.

An amazing true story, extremely well written and informative. Easily recommendable to anyone that loves adventure or interested in the History of Nantucket whaling. Interestingly the Essex adventure was the original inspiration for Moby Dick.

My only complaint would be that the novel appears to be a stripped down version of another book called In the Heart of the Sea. If I had known this before purchase I think I would have bought that instead. However, I will certainly seek it out in the future.
Edit | More
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Aug. 2004
Format: Paperback
What does it mean to be indomitable? This book displays that wonderful human quality in a remarkably effective way. The next time you consider giving up, just imagine yourself on the trackless sea in a small boat from the Essex.
This story has to be one of the most astonishing survival tales in recorded history. Before I say more, let me caution you that this story (and parts of this review) is not for those with weak stomachs.
After their ship is disabled by an attacking sperm whale, the survivors find themselves on three open boats in the middle of the Pacific Ocean over 2,000 miles from their targeted landfall in South America. With luck, they will make it in 30 days. They soon find themselves in a stall as the winds fail to cooperate, except to provide severe storms that threaten to capsize the boats.
Soon, all the food is encrusted with salt and everyone is suffering with severe dehydration. Then things start to get worse! I won't go further, but you have an amazing story of survival ahead of you.
Two of the few survivors of this terrible ordeal later committed their experiences to writing, which provide great resources for this well-researched book.
At another level, the book is also extremely interesting because these experiences were important influences on Herman Melville's writing of the American classic, Moby Dick. The book makes that connection for you, including how Melville came to learn the story.
At a third level, the book is a fascinating history of whaling around 1920. If you are like me, you will cringe when the whalers devastate island after island . . . as well as the whale population. But that's not the limit to their willingness to use nature to their own advantage.
The ultimate irony is that the survivors went the wrong way.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I never thought there was a recorded account of an actual sinking of a ship by a whale...how wrong I was! This is the true story of the sinking of the whale ship Essex by an 80 ton sperm whale in the middle of the Pacific Ocean in 1820. This is `thee' actual story that prompted Herman Melville to write his famous Moby Dick novel.

Having been rammed by an angry whale the Essex sank within ten minutes and its twenty one man crew took to the sea with scant provisions in three whaling boats. What follows is a four thousands mile plus sea odyssey of incredible suffering and privation. Despite some serious errors of judgement where closer landfall could have been reached such as Easter Island, Pitcairn or Tahiti...the survivors show remarkable seamanship in reaching Chile after spending a desperate three months adrift.

This is not a tale along the lines of Shackleton's epic South however where all live to tell the tale of their ordeal. Only two of the three boats reach safety and only eight crewmen survive the journey, the remainder die a terrible death mainly from lack of food, water or from the adverse elements. When I say `mainly', some of the occupants die by `lot' selection by their crewmates and are killed....you can guess what comes after that...yes you guessed it messmate cannibalism.

This is a well written explanatory book that as well as highlighting the individual characters involved also gives a good descriptive narrative of the whaling techniques and equipment of the period. The description of the boat journeys however is the coup de main as the suffering and the despair of the crew leaps out from the pages.....a great single sitting read of four hours, it's that good!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a thoroughly well researched book and is written in a clear and easily readable style. What helps carry the narrative is that it is full of interesting details that carry the story along marvelously. It is the obvious inspiration for Herman Melville's 'Moby Dick'and Nathaniel Philbrick uncovers the connection.

For any fan of obscure history this is a must read and it is also a brilliant window into the attitudes of those who whaled out of Nantucket in its 'heyday', it is also entirely gratifying to know that one whale actually managed to fight back with devastating results for those that preyed on these wonderful creatures.

It uses original source material and does contain some detail of 'the custom of the sea' i.e cannibalism. If you have a hankering for tales of derring do and survival against the odds then you may also like 'The Batavia'Batavia's Graveyard: The True Story Of The Mad Heretic Who Led History's Bloodiest Mutiny
2 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x95c4a870) out of 5 stars 28 reviews
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9452d8c4) out of 5 stars Indomitable Survival Overcomes Impossible Circumstances 23 Sept. 2004
By Donald Mitchell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This story has to be one of the most astonishing tales of survival in recorded history. Before I say more, let me caution you that this story (and parts of this review) is not for those with weak stomachs.

After their ship is disabled by an attacking sperm whale, the survivors find themselves on three open boats in the middle of the Pacific Ocean over 2,000 miles from their targeted landfall in South America. With luck, they will make it in 30 days. They soon find themselves in a stall as the winds fail to cooperate, except to provide severe storms that threaten to capsize the boats.

Soon, all the food is encrusted with salt and everyone is suffering with severe dehydration. Then things start to get worse! I won't go further, but you have an amazing story of survival ahead of you.

Two of the few survivors of this terrible ordeal later committed their experiences to writing, which provide great resources for this well-researched book.

At another level, the book is also extremely interesting because these experiences were important influences on Herman Melville's writing of the American classic, Moby Dick. The book makes the connection, including how Melville came to learn the story.

At a third level, the book is a fascinating history of whaling around 1920. If you are like me, you will cringe when the whalers devastate island after island. But that's not the limit to their willingness to use nature to their own advantage.

The ultimate irony is that the survivors went the wrong way. Those from Nantucket did not know about Tahiti and Hawaii, and chose not to go in either of those directions -- either of which would have provided more rapid safety and comfort. The primary reason they chose not to go in these directions is because they feared running into cannibals. Soon the survivors were studying the remains of dead shipmates with hunger. And then it gets worse.

So, you have three different kinds of books to read here, anyone of which could be enormously enjoyable to you. Get ready for the trip of your life!
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9452d918) out of 5 stars Read this one before you read "In the Heart of the Sea" 2 Dec. 2010
By Tobias, Son of Floyd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As a Children's Librarian I picked this book up in an effort to get 6-8th grade boys to read something other than Goosebumps. Having seen the movie Moby Dick, and reading that this book is the true story that inspired Melville to write that book, I have to admit I also wanted to read this book.

(At the time I was unaware of Philbrick's "In the Heart of the Sea" which was written with an older audience in mind)

The book is written with teens and young adults in mind. What impressed me with the book was the way Philbrick took the time to describe life aboard a whaler in a way that non-nautical types would understand.

If you have no knowledge of whaling in the early 1800s, I'd suggest picking up this book rather than tackling Philbrick's "In the Heart of the Sea" If you've already read "In The Heart of the Sea" thsi book will be a disappointment.

From the beginning, of the book you get the feeling that things are not going to go well. What will amaze people unfamiliar with the story is just how bad things get!

In all, however the story becomes one of sacrifice, survival and faith in not only others but of God. The book is a welcome collection for any middle school's historical fiction collection and quick read for any adult interested 19th century high seas adventure.

If you are an adult who is already familiar with the whale ship Essex or have read other books in this genre then go straight for In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex and skip this book. You'll be disappointed.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9548ce64) out of 5 stars Good Writing When Exciting But Otherwise BORING 19 April 2006
A Kid's Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A monster of a whale is bent on the destruction of your boat. What do you do? This is the decision the crew of the whale ship Essex has to make. Told through the journals and accounts of two surviving crew members the true tale of Moby Dick is detailed and interesting.

Will the crew survive? Will they be able to eat fish and birds or will they have to resort to eating each other? Will they ever find their way back to civilization? Will they be able to conquer their hunger and thirst and ration their supplies or will they give in to temptation and finish off all of them?

Join Nathaniel Philbrick in this tale of survival and woe in the descriptive story of the Essex's crew's endurance and anguish.

Author's Note: Although this review makes the book sound exciting and suspenseful, it focuses on the finer points. Most of the book is descriptions of everyday life and has no suspense or excitement whatsoever. While this book is very informative if you have any need to learn about whaling, it is somewhat boring and I would not recommend it to anyone. If you are looking for suspense or excitement I suggest you read The Alex Rider Adventures by Anthony Horowitz or The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer. Thank you for reading this review, I hope that it was helpful.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x954dc8e8) out of 5 stars Revenge of the Whale 9 May 2007
A Kid's Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Revenge of the Whale is about a whaleship journey, with the ship Essex. Captain George Pollard faces many mysterious, and fatal incidents with two different kinds of whales, and many different kinds of weather. This whaleship sailed out of Nantuckett, MA to find only one resource...oil. But they've come across more than just oil, but tragedy along with it.

My personal favorite part of the book is when the crew first sees land in months. I liked this part of the book becuase, it gave me a great essence of releif. I also liked this part of the book becuase, it showed that God gave the crew mercy, something they've always needed. The last reason I liked this book is becuase, I was thinking about what the job description to be a whaler if they told the applicant everything, " You may find yourself eating your best friend, starving to death, dieing of thirst, and drinking the blood of turtles.

I reccommend this book to only a mature audience becuase, little kids would certainly not appreciate this incredible historical story. There is also some confusing and misleading parts of this book that young people wouldnt care for or understand. This story may also bring fear to a small child of the ocean or whales. Once again, mature audiences only!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9480781c) out of 5 stars Tough to rate--for the Kids, or an Abridged Version of In the Heart of the Sea? 24 Jun. 2014
By Harbormaster - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like a book report for a demanding teacher, I feel compelled to write certain reviews. In fact, I wish this was required reading for the kids as part of American and maritime history.

This one is tougher to write than any other review because while I liked the book immensely I cannot in good conscience give it the rating I think it deserves. See, I bought it for my kids ages 9 and 12, and they did not like it--it bored them.

One is a voracious reader, but whales and sea stories are not her thing. The nine year old likes sea stories, but reading is not his thing and much to my chagrin, this appealed to neither child.

After two weeks of asking them to read it, I started reading about 10 pages a night to them before bed. It was a sleep aid for one, and had the other reading her own book. After four or five nights, they were avoiding me at bed time--"don't you and Mom have something serious to talk about?" What's an old Harbormaster to do then?

I kept reading after they went to sleep and found it so enjoyable I ordered Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea--the unabridged version for adults. Waiting upon its arrival.

Is this book impressive enough to read? Yes, if you are the right audience.

The details of the whaling industry were more than adequate for the kids and adults alike. You can tell the author did his homework and the story was dear to him as a resident of Nantucket where the Essex hailed from. Like his other works, this is well written taking you on a well-paced narrative with enough background interspersed to inform as well as entertain. It far exceeds the pacing of other sea stories which I review elsewhere.

What makes this special is the author takes you down the path of both good and bad decisions made in the whaleboats after the sinking. The contrast between a decisive and a democratic leader meant the difference between life and death. The distinct difference in leadership between the Captain, first, and second mates in charge of the whaleboats showed predictive results in who survived, who did not, and even later career success. That Philbrick ably tests leadership styles with discernible outcomes is probably lost on the younger reader. The selflessness exhibited by one character is haunting but suggests a level of cowardice to see his hunger end. There is also a group of survivors who choose smartly outside of the command decisions and therefore increase their probability of survival greatly. There is selfishness, despair, courage, prejudice, and faith. Good and bad traits of humanity come to trial in a life and death ordeal.

Philbrick discusses what it takes to survive and the mentality of what it took to survive 90 days at sea. This is worth reading to discussing at length with your own kids...when they are ready--for it is applicable to when they are tested. In a world where kids have few chores, are coddled, and have little to worry about--this would be a heck of a lesson if you can teach it.

Give it an equivocal rating--I despise my own inability to give this more than a mediocre rating it is a better book than that for the young, but can't bring myself to either pan the book or rave about it. If the book is targeted to the younger set and can't hold their attention then it can't be a 5 or 4 star. Despite my rating, Philbrick is a gifted author and I hope he does more of his American history books for the younger audience.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback