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Revenge of the Lawn: Stories 1962-1970 Paperback – 30 Mar 2006

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Paperback, 30 Mar 2006
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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books; Main edition (30 Mar. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841958662
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841958668
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.1 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 397,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Charming . . . the stories have memorable or beautifully handled moments of observation (London Review of Books)

His writing manages to conjure up a feeling of relaxation and well-being, somehow existing in our reality without being touched by it - easy to fall into and over far too soon. After reading this you'll feel like you've been on holiday with a friend. (Time Out)

The verbal humour and zany charm of the book remain quite irresistible. (Daily Telegraph)

He was an absolute original who found cause for celebration in the most unlikely places. (Guardian)

Book Description

62 of Brautigan's ultra-short stories, set in Tacoma, Washington and San Francisco in the late fifties and early sixties

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A collection of stories that are snap shots of life in America as seen by Richard Brautigan.

Ranging from childhood in Tacoma, through to California in the 60's.

His ability to squeeze a rich and vivid story into as little as a single page is incredible, and possibly made more meaningful as he is writing about his own life and experiences.

A must have Brautigan.
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Format: Paperback
While, indeed, Richard Brautigan may "ramble" and this anthology may not seem to possess a central theme, it is still classic Brautigan, an assemblage of previously published short stories, many reflecting the brilliance that was Brautigan. Certainly it shows his creativity and originality and his hold on the "flavor" of what was the late-Sixties in California! Brautigan, while having some shorter novels with success, still seems to be more in control of the short stories. He writes a mean poem, too.

In "Revenge of the Lawn," the emotions he evokes range from the absurd to the poignant--he seems to capture the gamut! The title story is superb, of course, but "Halloween" is hard to beat, as well. The touching revelation of sensitivity in "Corporal" is also unmatched. And who can overlook the brilliance of "1/3, 1/3, 1/3"! The author is able to present a deftness that even Hemingway couldn't achieve! His surreal writing certainly won him many readers' hearts. With him and Lawrence Ferlingetti, the San Francisco scene couldn't have been more representative in literature. Granted, some of his "stuff" is easily dismissable, but when Brautigan was good, he was very good! (Billyjhobbs@tyler.net)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In a weak episode of nostalgia for the 1970s, I ordered this book and downloaded a couple of tracks by Captain Beefheart that were actually listenable to. Beefheart was sublime, The Revenge of the Lawn was... weak. And yet Brautigan was highly rated back then. For me, this set of stories has not stood the test of time.
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Format: Paperback
Richard Brautigan’s prose-style is something other-worldly, mixed in with quirks and oddnesses, surreal confections, not often stories, they are more like insights or sometimes fancies. It’s difficult to isolate from the whole, the qualities he brings to his writing. For instance, in a complaint against “Complicated Banking Problems” (the title of the piece) he complains of standing in line thus: “I have to stand there and endure the financial cartoon crucifixions of America.” In another piece on hunting (which he seems spectacularly bad at, admitting he never managed to bag a kill), he tells us that: “A 44.40 isn’t exactly the greatest bird gun in the world. It lets go with a huge slow-moving bullet like a fat man opening a door.” He is funny, naïve, gentle and now and again there is the touch of genius in his descriptions. Sometimes you have doubts. What to make of this, for instance?

“Hawks circle in the sky like the lost springs of old railroad watches looking for correct protein wandering somewhere below to swoop down upon and devour chronologically.”

Almost like sprung poetry, but also arcane, quite difficult to see in the mind’s eye, which is really quite antithetical to poesy, but also somehow cleverly linked together. The Chronology and the lost springs and the railroad watches have a link – but only just. It stretches the metaphor beyond it’s formal or usual purpose.

At other moments his constructions work in a slightly clumsy, but hugely empathetic way, as here: “Warm fog swirled in the canyon as we gradually descended. A hundred feet in from of us everything was lost in the fog and a hundred feet behind us everything was lost in the fog. We were walking in a capsule between amnesias.
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