• RRP: £15.99
  • You Save: £1.81 (11%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Revealing Eden: Save the ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Revealing Eden: Save the Pearls Pt. 1 Hardcover – 13 Feb 2012

1.9 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£14.18
£9.24 £2.21
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.18 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Sand Dollar Press Inc (US) (13 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0983650322
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983650324
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 2.9 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 1.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,257,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Being at the bottom of the barrel is hard to fight up from. "Revealing Eden" is set in a far flung post apocalyptic future where darker skin proved to be a boon, and people of the lighter skin dwindled in number and found themselves on the bottom of the social ladder. Seventeen year old Eden is doomed to be outcast from her society if she does not find a mate before her eighteenth birthday, but the currents are hard to fight against. The kindness of a stranger may give her a chance to fight back yet, even as the world crushes down around her. "Revealing Eden" has plenty to consider on the issues of race and romance, very much recommended reading from acclaimed writer of novel and screenplay Victoria Foyt.
- Midwest Book Review
I was actually surprised by how political this books was. It's very race centred with the "coals" being the ruling race and looking down on the lowest-of-the-low "pearls." "Pearls" have a special section on public transport and they work mainly as lowly servants to the "coals," it's all like a reverse of the real racism that used to happen and, unfortunately, is still going about. In this post apocalyptic world, the sun's radiation is too high for people to go outside in the daylight hours. The lighter your skin, the more danger you're in. This means that "pearls" are low in number while "coals" are rising up. You must mate by your 18th birthday or you're cut off from all resources and "pearls" also have to cover up their white skin so they don't offend the "coals," and also so they don't get killed. Eden has a job in a research lab purely because of her dad's genius, a pearl would never have such a high job otherwise. She unwittingly brings about the downfall of her dad's experiment and she and her father must escape along with her father's newest test subject. Eden's views change drastically while stuck in the jungle with Bramford, her former boss and father's current test subject. I think Eden is a relatable lead, although therei

About the Author

Victoria Foyt is well known for her work as a screenwriter, actress, producer of critically acclaimed independent films, including DAjA vu and Last Summer in the Hamptons. She has appeared on major television and radio outlets, at film festivals around the world, and in many magazines, including Vogue, O at Home, and Town and Country. Her debut novel, The Virtual Life of Lexie Diamond (HarperCollins), a young adult (YA) supernatural mystery, received critical acclaim, including a five-star review from TeensReadToo.com. She established Sand Dollar Press in 2011 to promote YA novels through film-quality, online campaigns. Save the Pearls Part One: Revealing Eden is her first release, tied to an interactive site: SaveThePearls.com, and a newsfeed.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
If you want to read a decent book that subverts race issues, go read Malorie Blackman's Noughts and Crosses series, which actually treats race relations with the insight and sensitivity it deserves. This is horrendously racist, and seems to be an attempt to depict white people as the 'true victims' of a racist society while labeling PoC as beastly, and also uses blackface as a plot device. Seriously disgusting.
1 Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Frankly, the premise is over romantizised and completely trivialises actual issues. I'm getting so sick of all these new young adult novels where the only thing the female protagonist cares about is finding a man. The "materate" scenario was just horrible. Why can't I read about a girl who's got better things to do than get laid? And don't even get me started on the "reverse racism". I can't even begin to describe how ridiculous this garbage is.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is merely an excuse for white people who complain about how terrified they are of black people. Oh, how awful to be treated as less than human, to be constantly told you are unattractive because of your race - oh wait, that's everyday life for black people. And the way in which her concept is executed is laughable - the poor, ostracised masses are named after precious gems (oh, and did no-one tell Foyt pearls come in black?) while the powerful, greedy, "beastly" (yes, this is from the book) black rulers are called "coals". And blackface is a plot device.

The racism here isn't even subtle. Talking about racial oppression is just fine - as long as it supports the poor white people.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The product of a privileged white lady who has internalised all sorts of racism and misogyny, pseudo-liberal crap and thinks being colour-blind means everyone is the same - no, it means you turn a blind eye to the problems of society. Despite saying black people are in power, this author refers to PoC as 'coal' and 'beastly', hardly your positive connotations. Racist as hell.
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
There are quite a few things wrong with this novel, which I think completely justify a one-star rating (it would be no stars if such a thing was possible). In order to keep this as concise as possible, I will list the problems.

-The cover. A white girl in black-face. Does this even really need to be discussed? Why do people not see the problem with this?
-The title.
-The awful syntax and grammar.
-Pearls (white people). Coals (black people). Taking into account the fact that coal is ACTUALLY a slur used to insult POC.

"Before she knew it, she blurted out an incendiary racial slur. "Get your hands off me, you damn Coal!""

-Black people portrayed as savage and horrible, with no saving graces in their characters whatsoever. Black male described as a 'beast' and actually literally turns into one. I don't think I need to elaborate on how this is disgusting. Similes and metaphors relating to animals used at least twice in connection to black males.

-Uninteresting, slightly non-existent plot.
-Completely flat unlikable characters (Particularly Eden who is a whiny brat with a superior attitude despite being 'inferior')

While the author might not necessarily be a racist, she has certainly succeeded in creating a racist book which is insulting and problematic. And this isn't even taking into account the promotional videos (which come with their own set of problems).

It is clear that no self-respecting publishing house would have touched this novel with a barge-pole, so it makes complete sense that it is self-published.

This book should come with a trigger warning for racism.

*If people are interested in books with a similar theme executed in an infinitely superior manner, Malorie Blackman's Noughts and Crosses series is perfection. It handles race in a sensitive manner, without relying on ridiculous tropes.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
The title is not an exaggeration.
I'm still angry that I wasted my time on this awful book after reading the stomach-churning first chapter. This isn't going to be the most coherent review because all I want to do is swear and rant but Amazon guidelines won't allow me to. So here goes:

Misogynistic boring rubbish with poor world building which also happens to be incredibly racist. I'm not easy to offend but wow, I was shaking with rage by the end of the first chapter and only continued because I didn't want the author's 'fans' (scary thought) to accuse me of criticising without reading the entire book. The science didn't make sense and I almost stopped reading after a line where Eden compares losing what is essentially an even more high tech version of the internet to being raped. This book should never have been published. And I read the book getting more and more aghast that the author could find the time to google Latin names for animals but couldn't find out that jaguar in Spanish is not 'un tigre' or that Spanish is not the appropriate language for the people she is portraying.

And as for the romance? Here's an excerpt.

`I'm watching every move you make Eden.'

Romantic, huh?

I can't get over the fact that *spoiler* the author turns the main male black character into a literal beast (look up the Mandingo stereotype) and then has the perfect excuse to refer to him as 'beastly' and 'savage' throughout the rest of the book. I'd applaud her for her subtlety if it wasn't as subtle as being hit over the head with a brick.

Did I mention there is bestiality in the book too? I can't take a romance seriously when one half of the couple is deeply racist and whiny and the other half of the couple is not only moody and domineering but...
Read more ›
1 Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback