Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Restoration Game Hardcover – 1 Jul 2010

3.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£1.96 £0.01

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (1 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841496472
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841496474
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.8 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,169,769 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

This is one of the great ironies of contemporary literature: the books that ask the deepest and most profound questions tend to be situated in the most marginalised of genres... Ken MacLeod's [novels] are works of science fiction so worryingly close to reality that he may well be hailed as a prophet (Scotland on Sunday)

Book Description

The compelling new near-future thriller from the award-winning author of THE EXECUTION CHANNEL and THE NIGHT SESSIONS.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 July 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'd never read any of Ken MacLeod's books before so wasn't sure what to expect (and I don't know if this one is typical). But I did find it absorbing, thought provoking and entertaining. I don't want to give away too much of the plot, but it consists of two greatly contrasting elements - one might say universes. Precisely how they are linked,what is real, and what isn't, is hinted at but not made clear until the end (and I'm not sure even then if you can be completely sure).

Most of the book describes Lucy's (a young woman working for a games developer in Edinburgh) experiences as she is sucked into a bizarre conspiracy which combines the politics of the Caucasus (this is in 2008, the year that tension between Russia and Georgia spilled over), family history, smuggling and the CIA. This is a fast moving strand and there is a good contrast drawn between the stoically ordinary Lucy (who has, though, a dramatic past) and a strange gallery of figures (some relatives) who appear to overturn her life. I was reminded a bit of the setup of a John Buchan novel (though the politics are much further Left). Perhaps the only jarring note here is how readily Lucy agrees to drop everything and go off on a quixotic mission in Krassnia, the Caucasian republic at the centre of things. But that may be explained in the denouement (difficult to say more without giving things away). "Restoration", it turns out, is a theme throughout the book, with a number of different levels of meaning.

But this is more than an action thriller. Framing the book is a different perspective, which recurs here and there in the main narrative, not being resolved until the very end. You can then go back and read the opening section with a completely different level of understanding.

It's all very deftly done, and if this is typical of MacLeod's work, I need to do some catching up with his earlier books. I'd be grateful suggestions about where best to start!
6 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What an odd book. It starts at the end, takes a large number of detours, a few history lessons and then ends, Russian doll-like, back at the start.

It is, of course, well written, as you'd expect of a Ken Macleod novel. Narrated in the first person, singularly female, the story is set pretty much anywhere between Edinburgh and Auckland, but mainly happens in the small state of Krassnia, sandwiched somewhere between Georgia, Ossetia and Abkhazia.

Looking back on it, it is fairly obvious where it's going, but the tale seems to me to get a little bogged down in back-story, making it a bit hard going at times. It wasn't until half way through that the penny dropped, but that didn't stop my overall enjoyment.

It seems that what we've got here is one very powerful and interesting but not wholly original idea. And the idea does not really lend itself to a narrative. In that a story can be made of it at all is an achievement, and there are some appealing characters moving the action along, not least the heroine Lucy Stone. In the end, there is no great surprise. Still, putting that central idea into a narrative does allow Macleod to test out a few 'what if' scenarios and some of those are really fun. What if Spartacus's slave revolt had won? Would Latin still be the lingua franca? Would there be Romans on Mars?

There are several references to external events and characters - apart from Georgia and Ossetia, there are, for example, references to Slartibartfast,
...Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I suppose it is a sign of the increasing respectability of science fiction amongst literary circles, but there appear to be two new hybrid genres springing up: "serious mainstream/SF" and "thriller/SF", where the cores of the books aren't really SF at all, but they are set in a near-future with a veneer of speculative science. And they are generally pretty enjoyable. A lot of thanks has to go to Salman Rushdie and Margaret Atwood for essentially inventing the first hybrid, and to Iain (M) Banks for additional respectability, even though he doesn't hybridise.

"The Restoration Game" is definitely part of the second hybrid genre, and a good example of it. The central nine tenths could almost have been written by John Le Carre (which is in itself a recommendation), and it is only the top and tail that get the novel put on the SF shelves of the bookshops.

I liked the heroines, and a well-paced plot made the book a definite page-turner. It's the first Ken McLeod I have read, but I'll certainly check out some more of his stuff.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really didn't know what to expect from this book. I am a great fan of Ken MacLeod - he manages to write sci-fi in a way that does not get bogged down in too much detail. He does not have to describe/justify every leap of belief, just states it and you go with it. This story is set in the very near future, the distant future and ... at the risk of giving a little bit of the game away ... somewhere else.
Mostly it's a good old fashioned spy story with some very modern twists. I really enjoyed it and so will you if you like your sci-fi populated with real people in real situations and not full of robots and Jedis.
Recommended.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews