Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £5.99

Reproduction

4.7 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Customers also viewed these available items
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Amazon's Human League Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product details

  • Audio CD (28 Jan. 2003)
  • Label: Pid
  • ASIN: B00077F3CG
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Lacking the polish of their commercial mega-hit Dare and later efforts such as Hysteria and Octopus, Reproduction is an intriguing reminder of what made Human League so interesting in the first place.
Before enlisitng two schoolgirls to go on tour with them, the League were a group of idealistic young blokes from Sheffield with a manifesto to create ground-breaking elecronic music without the support of any traditional 'rock' instruments. They definitely succeeded in their aim, and the 17 tracks on this remastered LP are testament to this success.

My favourite songs here are the doom-laden Circus of Death and Blind Youth - the latter reminiscent of something fellow synth pioneers Blancmange might have released - and I also love early singles, the anthemic 'Empire State Human' and the simply brilliant 'Being Boiled'. The raw energy and mordant wit that runs through the album is what made the band so original, and the irony-free cover of Righteous Brothers' You've Lost That Loving Feeling' is simply the icing on the cake.

Commercial success meant that the band would never quite scale such artistic heights again, but this and the equally stirring Travelogue stand as examples of how synth pop truly began.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Not as immediate as Travelogue. I wasn't sure whether to buy this remaster, but am glad I did! The artwork is very similar to the original '88/'90 cd issues (transparent liner tray but no pictorial ads for the rest of their back catalogue), including the spines - and the disc is now a printed picture disc. More important is the music, ofcourse. This remaster has kept all the integrity of it's predecessor (note the CD version of "Path..." is not the original 1970's release)whilst removing a lot of the hiss and heaviness. "ESH" shines now, slightly re-eqd to improve it's punchiness, and the bonus "Introducing" is not purely lifted from a very crackly single (as per previous CD). Most of the bonuses are probably still from vinyl, but if they are someone has done a very good job in removing as much surface noise as they could. Overall this get 5 stars because of price, packaging and sound, and the fact it's made a difficult album sound a wee bit more accessible.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
My older bro brought this album home one day long ago (1979 in fact). Already blown away by lashings of Jarre, Isao Tomita and Kraftwerk, this made a huge impact.
The sheer...weirdness of it all was incredible. As arty and poppy as you could wish, the League were intend on doing things differently. Here was their debut manifesto; a stark collection of pop gems like Empire State Human, Blind Youth (a reply to the 'no future' ethos of punk) and the stunning cover of You've Lost That Loving Feeling (later also covered by Erasure) set out their case impeccably. Contrast this with the searing Almost Medieval and the album version of Circus Of Death and you've a totally absorbing package.
The Fast Product stuff sounds great. I love the slightly rough feeling of the intro to Being Boiled ("Ok...ready...let's do it!") and Oakey's spoken intro to Circus Of Death. I still don't know whether that Daily Telegraph reference is true or not!
The League were incredibly influential. On here it's not hard to see why...
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Great first album by the original version of The Human League.

Don't buy expecting Dare or anything similar - this is experimental, challenging, ground breaking early proto synth pop with some great songs thrown in like Empire State Human, Almost Medieval and Circus Of Death.

Very, very good, only docked one star because their second album Travelogue was even better and I can't give them both five stars!

Highly recommended and ground breaking.
2 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Reproduction remains a powerful debut, maybe not as potent as the follow-ups Travelogue (1980) or Dare! (1981), but with the eight bonus tracks it remains a classic collection of early electronica. Human League#1 came out of the same Sheffield electronic movement as Cabaret Voltaire- a band they would have much in common with in their early incarnation (for the roots see The Golden Hour of the Future)Listening to Reproduction now it's surprising how much HL#1 have in common with other proto-electronic/post-punk bands of their era, notably CV, OMD, Simple Minds, Suicide & Throbbing Gristle. Perhaps it was the aftereffect of the Winter of Discontent, or maybe it was the zeitgeist of genocide & war- but Reproduction fits well with the rise of Cold War paranoia: the League at one with their grim surroundings, reminding you of Pere Ubu when they recorded The Modern Dance. Here they were then cutting edge- much further ahead than Joy Division were & preceding acts such as Depeche Mode & Soft Cell. A very pure electronic sound is heard thoughout- from single Circus of Death (two versions) to the po-faced take on You've Lost That Loving Feeling (which recalls the Future cover versions)- this is like a whole album of Warm Leatherettes! Perhaps it was the curious haircut, too much Kafka, but Reproduction remains kind of heavy- the ideal music to read JG Ballard to! (Ballard's so-called 'urban disaster' trilogy being the ideal reading matter: Crash, Concrete Island & High Rise)
Blind Youth as 1980's Life Kills show how indebted early Soft Cell were to the League & has the amusing line "dehumanisation is a big word/it's been around since Richard the third!
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback