£10.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Renaissance Man (Doct... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Renaissance Man (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures) Audio CD – Audiobook, 29 Feb 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£10.99
£5.67 £27.81
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£10.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Renaissance Man (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
  • +
  • The Wrath of the Iceni (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
  • +
  • Destination: Nerva (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
Total price: £32.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd (29 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844356132
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844356133
  • Product Dimensions: 14.3 x 1 x 12.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 429,036 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As part of Leela’s continuing education (which is to become an underlying theme throughout Big Finish’s Fourth Doctor and Leela plays) the Doctor decides to expand Leela’s knowledge of her ancestors by taking her to the Morovanian Museum, supposedly the greatest collection of human knowledge and artefacts. It soon becomes apparent that this is a museum of a very different sort and the Tardis crew soon become murder suspects in what appears to be an English country village.

Much of the play is concerned with the difference between and knowledge and learning, between information and understanding. It fits in well to the ongoing theme of Leela’s education, first emphasised in ‘The Talons of Weng Chiang’. Harcourt, the Renaissance Man of the title, believes he and the museum are on a quest for knowledge that will give birth to a new era of learning, but to the Doctor he is merely stealing knowledge with no perspective or comprehension of what he takes. It is a knowledge without foundation or application. The small debate as to who is the cleverest man in the room (a nod to the Eleventh Doctor story ‘The Impossible Astronaut/Day of the Moon’) represents the opposing sides. To Harcourt it is himself because he possesses and has access to a larger source of information. But to the Doctor this information is a meaningless list of data if there is no understanding of it.

In a museum where the exhibits miraculously appear with every source of information obtained irrespective of authenticity, the Fourth Doctor is clearly in his element inventing ludicrous ‘facts’ to beguile and defeat Harcourt. It is obvious that Baker is taking enthusiastic delight in this.

Not the best story in this series but still fairly entertaining.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Mar. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Second in the new series of Doctor Who audio plays featuring Tom Baker as the Doctor and Louise Jameson as his companion Leela.

This one stands pretty much on it's own and can be listened to by any casual listeners without you needing to hear any other stories in order to understand it.

It runs for two episodes of roughly twenty eight minutes each [approx] and is complete on a single cd.

The story sees the Doctor trying to continue Leela's education [a linking theme for this run of stories] by taking her to visit a famous museum that has a history of the human race. But the TARDIS instead seems to have brought them to a sleepy English village.

They meet an eccentric local resident.

And then Harcourt. Owner of the local manor house and a collector. Of many things.

People then start to die. And suddenly life in the village gets very strange.

Can the Doctor work out what is going on and save the day?

As with the first in this run the sound design and the music are very good indeed and do really recreate the feel of the Tom Baker era on tv very well.

This is also quite a clever script. It might just have worked on tv at the time. Strange things do happen throughout the first part, and then the ending to part one does seemingly explain what is going on.

But part two then goes in rather unexpected directions. It all comes together very well though, in a final confrontation with the villain of the piece where the Doctor saves the day in a manner that is both utterly non violent and really very clever. And there's a strong moral message to the story as well, which has an influence on this.
Read more ›
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 4 May 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is another in the series of new full audio stories featuring Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor and Louise Jameson as Leela. I really enjoy the relation between the Doctor and Leela; their personalities have a good sync in these stories. The Doctor is still trying to teach Leela new things, so decides to take her to a museum - but, of course, that's not quite where they end up - or do they? Along the way, Leela learns about butterflies, and struggles with the concept of "Runny Science" (Renaissance).

Both Tom Baker and Louise Jameson are brilliant in this story; their characters are spot on, and their interaction with the other characters, particularly the sinister Harcourt, is great. The Doctor displays the required anger and disappointment, and horror at Harcourt's actions wonderfully; there is no loss to the listener from this story being solely audio - you really do get the "look and feel" of the story conveyed throughout.

It's an intricate yet intriguing story, but I really wish these new Fourth Doctor stories were longer than just two episodes on a single cd! I want more!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
An improvement in quality of script over Destination: Nerva (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures), but still not the write Doctor dialogue for the period set (pre-Horror of Fang Rock). Leela's character is well observed.

I certainly feel that this story plays to the strengths of audio, but could also have worked well as a television script at the time (feeling a bit like The Android Invasion in style).

Comparing the first two stories of the 4th Doctor relaunch to the equivalent Blake's 7 The Liberator Chronicles Box Set: 1 (Blake's 7), the latter still remains better observed and faithful to the original. I am quite surprised that Big Finish have made this slip because it does draw attention to itself. Setting the era pre-Horror was probably not a good move. For the sake of canonicity at the potential expense of a little fun, the dialogue should have been toned down and more serious.

All in all a good product. It is of course very nice to have 4th Doctor at Big Finish, and had we not had more than ten years of fabulous output of stories that enhanced Doctors 5-8, we may have been more content with what we have here.

A five star story reduced to four stars because of aforementioned "fit" issues. Ignoring the past and as a stand-alone piece it is very enjoyable, and any fan of the Leela character will be well-rewarded.
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback