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on 10 April 2017
Great book. Very good overview of the three main views.
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on 22 April 2016
Good concise distilling of three main views. All three men have written weightier tomes on the topic but this book brings out the main points and puts them together in a very manageable way. The theology is vital and well explained but the pastoral implications of that theology are given good consideration too.
I like the way each writer has a chance to respond to the other positions as well as putting their own. Very helpful clear book for anyone grappling with the subject in the church.
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on 11 July 2013
Although I found the change in approach confusing, it was easy to read and made me cnsider different issues that might not have occurred to me.
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on 19 January 2016
A very helpful spectrum of views from respected evangelical scholars.
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on 24 August 2016
This book, by three well known scholars, illustrates 3 different views on remarriage after divorce.

It begins with Gordon Wenham's view which considers remarriage after divorce never acceptable.

The second view, by William Heth, considers remarriage after divorce permissible for the grounds of adultery and desertion.

The third, by Craig Keener, is the most liberal and regards remarriage after divorce acceptable for circumstances beyond adultery and desertion.

All the three scholars discuss whether devorced and remarried people should hold leadership positions in the Church, and comment on each other's essay.

There is a brief introduction and conclusion by Mark Strauss.

In the introduction, Mark Strauss invites the reader to approach this book as a dialogue and avoid attack on other views.

Although we certainly should avoid needless attacks, it is important to keep in mind that, when sin is concerned, the stake is indeed high: heaven or hell. Therefore, loving correction is essential.

I would like to conclude my review by saying that although my view is akin to Wenham's, I think it is necessary to comment on one inconsistency in his essay.

On page 123, in his response to Craig Keener, Wenham wrote: “He begins [Craig] with cases where pastors have attempted to break up second marriages. I have never advocated this. My view is that people should be discouraged from remarrying after divorce; but where such marriages exist, it would be tactless in the extreme to suggest that the couple break up”.
In my opinion, this statement is the ultimate in inconsistency. If remarriage after divorce is adultery and a sin (as Wenham claims) it is unacceptable to tolerate a second “marriage” in a Christian Church. There is no second marriage therefore nothing should be broken.
When people accept Christ and His message, they surely realize when a form of cohabitation is sinful and, they surely understand that celibacy or reconciliation are the only options when divorce is involved.
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on 8 February 2017
As described and arrived on time
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VINE VOICEon 21 May 2009
This book portrays the three most traditionally held views re Marriage & Divorce within the church.
A good buy for those wanting to know these views, but in my opinion does not go far enough in presenting the fuller and often more important picture in giving clarity to those seeking personal answers regarding divorce & remarriage.
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on 20 April 2016
Met requirements
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