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The Relative Hills of Britain: Mountains, Munros and Marilyns (A Cicerone guide) Paperback – 1 Jan 1992

5.0 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press; 1992 First Edition edition (1 Jan. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852840684
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852840686
  • Product Dimensions: 14.8 x 2 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 586,557 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Synopsis

How many hills are there in Britain? Has anyone climbed them all? Where is there for hill walkers to go in the south of England? What is a hill anyway? The answers to these and other questions will be found in "The Relative Hills of Britain". This book dispenses with the common assumption that a hill must be at least 2000ft high to be worth climbing. Instead it concentrates on listing all the hills that are relatively high compared to the surrounding land, rather than compared to sea level. This approach leads to some interesting results: for example, the highest points in the Cotswolds and Chilterns, Campsies and Quantocks are all included, as well as the main summits on numerous Scottish islands, whereas well-known mountain summits such as Cairn Gorm, Bowfell and Carnedd Dafydd do not qualify. As well as being an invaluable reference work for all walkers, this book contains a fascinating collection of not too serious facts and figures about the Marilyns, as these relative hills have been called. The book is illustrated by a set of photographs and a large number of very clear maps, which make it easy to locate all the hills in each region.



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