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on 3 November 2017
A great read
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on 25 July 2014
read after hearing BBC 4's recent modernised version. Not at all similar, the original rather long winded!
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on 8 April 2014
Sir Walter Scott was nothing if not prolific not all of his titles have stood the test of time, Redgauntlet does so deseredly
A rollicking great Scottish yarn.
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on 12 September 2014
Walter Scott a bit under rated these days but I liked it
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on 31 August 2013
I wish I had realised that there was a glossary at the back. You can just about manage without a knowledge of legal Latin and the Scottish dialect. They add a real historical texture to the story. The characters are not modern in period dress. They have the attitudes and culture of the age. The heroes are flawed characters, the plot works and loose ends are tied together. The much smaller world they inhabited enables that.

You have to persevere but like travelling off the beaten track on holiday, it is well worth it.
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on 5 July 2013
No point in trying to add to the various detailed reviews of this book, so in concise terms, this is a an enjoyable tale. Not my favourite Scott novel, but worth reading purely as an entertaining story. This is a historical novel, not a history book, and this is how it should be approached.
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on 22 October 2014
I've loved them all but this is one of Scott's best: not only does it give a good insite into the huge divisions within society at that time and why they were there but it is so exciting. I can't wait to get to bed each night for a read - a real page-turner (I'm at 75% on my Kindle).
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on 27 November 2012
Before I began reading his novels (which is just a matter of weeks ago) Scott was to me 'the father of the historical novel' by repute only, having read about him as such in different sources (with the selfsame sources claiming that he was - either rightly or wrongly - little read these days). Having finished 'Redgauntlet' now, which is my fourth Scott-novel (having previously read Waverley; or 'Tis Sixty Years Since (Oxford World's Classics),The Antiquary (Oxford World's Classics) and Old Mortality (Oxford World's Classics)), I definitely tend to side with those who are of the opinion that it is a shame that he is so little read nowadays.

Indeed, 'Redgauntlet' is to my mind yet another fine example of a good historical novel, on a par with many more recent books and better than quite a few. The story - set in 1765 - is easily summarized: Darsie Latimer is an orphan whose history is clouded in mystery. He has been staying with the English lawyer Fairford and has struck up a real friendship with Fairford's son Alan. Latimer is sent to Scotland with the bizarre instruction that he is on no account to cross the border with England again before his 25th anniversary, but once in Scotland soon enough finds himself entangled in a (fictitious) plot to restore the exiled Prince Charles Edward Stewart (aka 'Bonnie Prince Charlie', who led the unsuccessful Jacobite rising of 1745) to the throne.

As with the other Scott-novels I've read so far, 'Redgauntlet' meets all the requirements of a good historical novel / adventure story: a fast-paced plot, a healthy dose of mystery, finely-drawn and engaging characters, a love-interest, and lots of 'couleur locale'. On top of that, and contrary to his other novels which are all written by an omniscient author, Scott experiments with different forms in 'Redgauntlet': part of the story is told in letters exchanged between Alan Fairford and Darsie Latimer, some of it is Darsie's diary, and yet other parts are plain narration.

Whether you have (as I had) preconceived ideas about Scott or not, this book is definitely worth the read, and I for one felt no hesitation whatsoever to immediately start reading Rob Roy (Oxford World's Classics)! And before I forget, in this edition - as is the case, in my experience, with all novels published in the Oxford World's Classics - it comes with an excellent introduction (in this case by Kathryn Sutherland).
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on 27 May 2015
as expected
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on 15 October 2016
good
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