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Red Rising Audio Download – Unabridged

4.4 out of 5 stars 194 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 16 hours and 10 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Avid Audio
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 7 Aug. 2014
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00LO0PUK0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Dec. 2014
Format: Paperback
I somehow managed to miss this book despite it getting lots of praise when it appeared earlier this year, but finally picked it up in anticipation of the sequel which is due early in 2015.

At first, I wondered what all the fuss was about. While the setting - a pitiless, hierarchical society that keeps its most downtrodden, the "reds", slaving in the mines of Mars - is well drawn, it didn't seem anything special. Then Brown did... something... and the book seemed to rise to a whole new level.

Darrow, the main protagonist, is one of the reds, who toil in atrocious conditions to produce the minerals that are needed to make Mars habitable. If they strain every muscle and meet their quote, they may get a little more food to share, a few more comforts, and Darrow shows himself bold - almost reckless - in straining to achieve this.

It's all a con, of course, and we pretty soon see that things are rigged to set the miners against each other and keep the elite - the "golds" on top at all times. So Darrow turns rebel, at terrible cost, and sets himself against the hierarchy. The rest of the book is then a thrilling description of how, in the "Institute" he is forced to play deadly power games with the sons and daughters of the elite in order to rise and win the power that will - perhaps - one day be used to free his people.

The story of what happens in those games is, again, a lesson in power and a lesson in division: I don't want to give too much away to anyone who hasn't read this yet but we see - as one might expect - that the structure of the mines is repeated at all levels, with friend set against friend, brother against brother (and sister).
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Format: Hardcover
Pierce Brown has created a stark vision of the future in Red Rising, his debut novel. Mars, and other inhabited worlds throughout our galaxy, is ruled by an elite class who have spent many hundreds of years creating a rigid culture where everyone is born, lives and dies in a predefined role. At the top are the Golds, the genetic crème de la crème, virtual living gods and the embodiment of perfection. Far below, on the bottom rung of the ladder, are the lowly Reds. They are the downtrodden masses, the miners and menial workers, largely ignorant of the huge lie that underpins their existence.

The Reds are viewed by most as little more than beasts of burden. From their ranks comes Darrow, a young man given the chance to rise above his station and try to right the wrongs that exist everywhere. A traumatic event in Darrow’s life opens his eyes to the larger world and a secret society tasks him with infiltrating the Golds as a 5th columnist. His goal? To bring down their rule from within. The hate that radiates from Darrow, and drives him to take on this likely suicidal mission, is palpable. In all honesty, knowing the reasons for his hate, I can’t say that I blame him. The Reds are being exploited at every turn and Darrow witnesses that exploitation at the most personal level. His rage is the fuel that fires his journey. There is an interesting evolution in his character as the plot unfolds. He experiences the slowly growing realization that it’s not just the Reds who are suffering. Irrespective of the colour caste someone is born into, they are as much a prisoner to their role as the Reds are. Darrow comes to appreciate the inequality that exists everywhere from the bottom right to the very top.
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By Keris Nine TOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 Dec. 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Ignore the bookseller's description which makes Red Rising sound like a Hollywood version of The Warlord of Mars (hold on, they messed that one up already didn't they?). Put aside the Hunger Games comparisons as well for now but don't dismiss them, because although the war-games element dominates Pierce Brown's debut novel, the first book of a new SF trilogy, its scope, range and tone is far more expansive and realistic in its outlook. There's a lot of relevant historical foundation used in the book relating to Napoleonic campaigns, to the political make-up of the Roman Empire and indeed the structure and stratification that exists within our own society. All of this is fascinating and thrilling to see played out in a controlled environment that itself has evident and intentional references to the Gods overseeing the lives of mortals from Olympus, but the real driving motivation for Red Rising and what makes it so absolutely involving, is the stirring underlying revolutionary sentiments that aim to overthrow the system.

The book's title works on a number of levels then, as it's set initially on Mars (though it will clearly extend far out beyond this in the later books), but it also implies a socialist revolution, since it deals with a section of the working population of this society known as 'Reds' who have been kept ignorant of the expansion of the human race into space, their ignorance used to keep them enslaved in cruel and impoverished condition mining helium from deep beneath the surface of the Red planet. One 'Helldiver' however, Darrow, discovers the truth however and, with the help of a secret underground network, is able to (somewhat improbably admittedly) infiltrate high Gold society.
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