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Red Rabbit Mass Market Paperback – 28 Aug 2003

2.0 out of 5 stars 112 customer reviews

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Mass Market Paperback, 28 Aug 2003
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 944 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New Ed edition (28 Aug. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141004916
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141004914
  • Product Dimensions: 18.3 x 11.2 x 4.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 480,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Red Rabbit is an innovative and intriguing entry in the Tom Clancy canon, satisfyingly sketching in details of his hero Jack Ryan's early life. The author can still be counted on to deliver the expected Clancy trademarks: this one is full of intriguing, well-researched detail, and studded with the adroitly staged action set-pieces we have come to expect.

Working on the bottom rungs of the CIA's analysis departments, Jack Ryan is given the unenviable mission of debriefing a key Soviet defector. He discovers a dark secret: there is a plot afoot to murder Pope John Paul. Of course, this is only one aspect of a massively complex skein of skulduggery, and as Jack penetrates to the heart of the mystery (with less assurance than usual--he is younger, after all), Clancy admirers will definitely feel all the right areas are being massaged. Not, perhaps, vintage Clancy, but still a stylish and economical piece of work that grips from the first page. --Barry Forshaw --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Booksellers, oil those tills. Tom Clancy returns to Jack Ryan's early days in a swiftly-moving novel of global political drama. Long before he was President, Jack Ryan was a novice CIA analyst; one of his first assignments was to debrief a high-level Soviet defector who told an amazing tale of officials planning to assassinate Pope John Paul. In the end, however, it will not just be the Pope's life, but the stability of the Western world that is at stake. Clancy's books (such as The Hunt for Red October and Clear and Present Danger) famously lack nuance, but are perfectly tooled machines for raising the pulse of the reader. And Clancy's jaw-dropping sales are the envy of all his many rivals. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I'm an American who has been living in the UK, going on for five years now. Usually, I'll read a Clancy book with great gusto. I love his earlier books. His Republican views never really bothered me before .......... before this one. I am just incredibly ashamed by this book. Forget the plot (boring), forget the characters (no new insights), and try to forget the conservative Republican jargon. This book's sole purpose is to rant and rave about the USA, Reagan, the CIA, the US health system, coffee, the DOW, food and to criticise anything non-American. From the way he goes on and on about the UK (NHS, coffee, food, the peeling paint and decay of the buildings, lazy workers who I assume rather be at home with their families instead with work colleagues, etc) and Russia I wasn't quite sure which country was worse off. They are both depicted as second world nations ... barely even that. Did anyone else notice that the good guys all have some form of Catholic backgrounds? It made me cringe every time Clancy had his American characters correctly predict the fall of the USSR or the futures in stocks. Oh how about when the CIA leaders were singing the praises for Martin Luther King? Yeah, right! The stereotypes of the British have been mentioned by many of the previous reviewers so no need to dwell on it again. My God, I have never read such arrogance, such righteousness, and sole ownership of high ethics. No wonder many non-Americans are annoyed by us. I wonder if Clancy understands the annoyance he has caused by his extremely bias tome?
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a big Clancy fan, but this is very disappointing. For starters, it is all a bit anticlimatic. You pretty much know how things are going to turn out for all the main protagonists with 20 pages of 'meeting' them. There is little action, and most of the book is portrayed in Jack's office or his home - film rights unlikely I think. And the end seems rushed, as though he had to get it to the publishers on time.
In addition, annoyingly Jack is portrayed as some sort of prophet. The collapse of communism, the collapse of the Japanese economy, the Soviet defeat in Afghanistan, how his wife would be a laser surgery pioneer, are all predicted by Jack in the space of a few days. Indeed it is apparently thanks to a letter from Jack that London is littered with Starbucks.
In addition this book is written in a patronising tone. It also seems far less balanced than previous books. There is a huge amount of America is great - nothing compares in this book. Perhaps this is what was required when Clancy wrote it?
Overall though I would not recommend this.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a Tom Clancy fan, on the strength of his previous books I bought this one straight 'off the shelf'.
But this book was disappointing. It was strongly nationalistic, sickeningly pro-american (to be expected but this was too much - possibly done in response to recent american developments?), anti-communist, patronising, and in parts racist, whilst not providing much in the way of redeeming features such as excitement or suspense.
On the upside, it was interesting to read a theoretical "how this could have happened" story, but this was constructed more like a biased documentary than a spy thriller; the lack of real action or plot twists ensured that my most common thought was "So what?"
If you're not a Jack Ryan fan, don't bother. If you are a fan, you'll probably want to read it simply so you don't miss anything, but don't expect too much.
Personally, I'm going to use this book to prop up my broken sofa.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I think most people who have read Tom Clancy before will agree that although the writing style isn't anything special the storylines are huge and complex, the attention to detail of warfare is second to none, and the characters who are found in many of Clancy's books (notably John Clark or in this case Jack Ryan) are interesting.
Well, perhaps Tom Clancy has had an off-day or is toying with the idea of writing children's books.. either way this book is rubbish (and I'm trying to be as polite as possible), and I've never said that of any book I've reviewed on Amazon.
The story itself is a combination of fact (the attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II), a conspiracy theory (that it was orchestrated by the KGB) and fiction (enter Jack Ryan... who I always think of as Harrison Ford due to his film roles). For those familiar with Ryan from other books, Red Rabbit is set in the early 80s, Ryan has an honourary knighthood (for saving the royal family in Patriot Games) but is not yet President (Executive Orders and thereafter).
So what do I dislike about this book so much:
- Weak storyline - as Clancy books go, there really isn't much to get excited about in this one. Once I got about a third of the way through I was convinced there would be another thread of the storyline to grip the reader but no, there was nothing.
- Where's the weapons and action? - A Clancy book without detailed description of weaponry, warfare and operational tactics just isn't a Tom Clancy book.
- Terrible writing style - I'm not sure why I've picked up on this but the style Clancy has adopted for this book is a bit like "Jack went up the hill. It was raining. Tomorrow would be an important day. "Hello, I'm Jack - do you want to be my friend?" etc.
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