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Red Plenty Paperback – 7 Jul 2011

4.5 out of 5 stars 56 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (7 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571225241
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571225248
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2.7 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Bizarre and brilliant book ... Spufford's genius is to re-create that moment as people lived it, rich in possibility, the future not yet assured ... this is like no other history book I have read ... it is hard to believe that there could be a more rigorous evocation of that brief, illusory moment when Soviet communism seemed poised to transform the world. I finished the book in awe, not just at Spufford's Stakhanovite research, but his skill as a novelist, his judgement as a historian and his sheer guts in attempting something simultaneously so weird and yet so wonderful.' --Sunday Times

'This strange, clever book blends fact and fiction to convey vast amounts of information with the light touch of the storyteller.' --Guardian

'Virtuoso storytelling in a series of vividly imagined episodes - funny, poignant, spine-chilling.' --Daily Telegraph

'An eccentric but vivid history ... seen through the eyes of imaginatively crafted fictional characters.' --The Times

'Virtuoso storytelling in a series of vividly imagined episodes - funny, poignant, spine-chilling.' -- Daily Telegraph

The book is rigorously researched and inventively conceived. --Independent on Sunday

'An eccentric but vivid history ... seen through the eyes of imaginatively crafted fictional characters.' --The Times

'Virtuoso storytelling in a series of vividly imagined episodes - funny, poignant, spine-chilling.' --Daily Telegraph

Book Description

Red Plenty by Francis Spufford: What if the Soviet 'miracle' had worked, and the communists had discovered the secret to prosperity, progress and happiness...?

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is a fantastic, innovative look at the economic policies of the USSR under Khrushchev. If my opening sentence sounds dull, please don't see it as a true representation of this book. Spufford's approach is to interweave extensive research with the imagination and invention of a novelist. The end result is a fantastic patchwork in which fictional characters rub shoulders with historical ones and stunning descriptive passages add lustre to what might have been dry, factual information.
Some experts might balk at the idea of a non-Russian speaker using secondary sources to construct such a book. Readers of Taubman's biography of Khruschchev might also feel that a sense of 'deja vu' creeps in at points. However, Spufford's 'novelistic' approach brought new angles to this topic for me and certainly made me think about certain aspects of the period in a different way.
I'm not sure that I have done an effective job in this review of explaining the wonderful book Spufford has created. All I can say is that, having read many of Spufford's sources previously, I was hugely impressed with the end result of his creative approach.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Spufford has a talent for conveying atmosphere, for recreating an era by means of anecdote, and he uses the technique to good effect here.

The story is of Soviet Russia, and how, through the appliance of science, it will forge ahead of the capitalists. Only it didn't happen like that.

Spufford relates the story by vignettes, first showing how the system might work, and the optimism engendered, then the gradual lapse into economic arthritis that led to the collapse of the system.

Well worth your money and your time.
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Format: Hardcover
As a 1950's Meccanophile I was thrilled by Spufford's `Backroom Boys' - a tale of British string and sealing wax inventiveness - and was very curious to see what he would make of recent Soviet History. I was not disappointed. He is a piece of work, that Spufford. He can certainly spin a good narrative. He managed to make Soviet History human - combining imagined vignettes of fictional characters with `proper' history. But unlike the usual depressing narratives covering that period (collapse of Communism - inevitable because repressive and over extended militarily) he shines a light on the totally understandable ideological commitment towards an envisioned better future realisable through the application of `Science' - physical, economic and social and managerial. If only the proletariat could be rescued from ignorance and taught to see the light - if only! Utopia is just over the horizon, and why not? What is life about if not the creation of a better world for more people, decent housing, clothing and adequate food? Spufford captures that feeling, that ideological current. Of course we know now that the experiment failed disastrously - but - and this is what I took from Spufford - there were people (ordinary people) who actually wanted it to succeed, who felt that any social organisation was better than a vast peasantry owned by a tiny aristocracy that was pre-revolutionary Russia. Just such a shame that the revolutionaries failed to trust the people.

And more - the 53 pages of notes on which the smooth narrative was based were as fascinating and as informative as the narrative itself. Well done, Spufford.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Spufford's "Red Plenty" is an amazing work. I never thought I'd ever read a novel about economics, but this is a rare work. Other reviewers have already captured a lot of what the work is about, but as an historian what this book did was something that a history book would struggle to do and that is provide a sensation of expectation.
Often the historian is faced with teleological arguments and the dreaded threat of anachronism when assessing history. Received wisdom now tells us that Soviet Union was doomed to fail, this attitude dooms historians to wonder why there was a cold war at all, surely the West could have just waited and not have been as pro-active? This book undermines that notion, partly through shrewd judgement by picking a period in which the Soviet Union had the edge, the late 50s and early 60s - the book parachutes the reader into the era in which the Soviets beat the US to the punch with the ICBM and when the planned economy represented a real challenge to the free market. Spufford infuses us with the aspirations of his characters and does a marvellous job of suspending disbelief, leaving the reader thinking at the end that maybe the Soviet decline wasn't inevitable and could have been so different if some personalities hadn't intervened. In some respects this should be essential reading for any cold war student - it really breathes life into the topic.
As a work of literature it provides a compelling set of interlinking stories, paced correctly and very readable. For those of you worried about the economic content, this is very accessible and like a good fairy tale key pieces of information and explanations are transmitted to characters that need them explained, helping the reader understand if necessary.
I'd recommend this book to anyone wanting a really entertaining read, interested in history or economics or even those who simply enjoy intelligent prose.
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