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Red Moon Hardcover – 19 Apr 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: St Martin's Press (19 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312874405
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312874407
  • Product Dimensions: 24.2 x 16.4 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,596,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Accomplished space historian Cassutt offers an intriguing account of Russia's space program as a gripping, atmospheric Cold War saga. . . . Tingling with political tension and ringing with authenticity, this dark, edge-of-your-seat thriller gives a launch-by-launch account of Russia's abortive struggle to keep abreast of NASA and win the space race." - "Publishers Weekly" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Michael Cassutt is noted for his writing about the space program -- not only articles in magazines such as "Space World," but a massive biographical encyclopedia, Who's Who in Space. Cassutt is the author of two previous mystery thrillers set within the space program, "Missing Man" and "Red Moon." He lives in Los Angeles, CA. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I thought that Cassutt's "Missing Man" was a superb book, but his latest venture into the mysterious and covert world of cosmonautics is simply without peer. I've been following spaceflight history for many years now, and I can see how the author (a renowned authority on the subject) has interwoven a fictional thriller story into the largely-unrevealed world of the Russian space program of the 1960's. Without spoiling the plot, the central focus is on the alleged murder of Russia's Sergei Korolev, the real-life "Chief Designer" of that nation's space program, whose reluctant anonymity only came to an end with his death on an operating table. Without him at the helm, Russia's space program fell apart, and America reached the Moon first. Because it is based very much on fact, this book is quite astonishing reading, and it is very obvious that Cassutt has done some deep and extensive research in putting together his book. There are many surprises stitched into the story, and it has proved to be a real page-turner for me. One of the best techno-thrillers for many years, in my humble opinion.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The trouble with histories of Soviet space efforts is that details are quite hard to come by, so Cassutt gets around this by writing a slightly fictionalised account to allow him to add rumour, interpretation, and idle conjecture to the few known facts. It takes the form of a fictional confession of someone who, thanks to various slightly clunky plot devices, manages to be right in the thick of the action, on a hunt for suspected dark forces who will stop at nothing to sabotage the effort.
As a way of getting a feeling for life in the USSR, this kind of works, although there is little new in here that you couldn't find out from (for example) Jamie Doran's much shorter biography of Yuri Gagarin (for example, space geeks might want to know a lot more about how the lander would have worked).
It's not exactly Tom Clancy in the thriller stakes, with flimsy two-dimensional characters about whom I struggled to care towards the end, and the "detective hunt" is a bit of a half-hearted afterthought.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The murky corners of the Soviet space program are revealed in this entertaining and fascinating thriller... I really enjoyed it, learning a lot while being entertained. Good stuff.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8fe31c78) out of 5 stars 14 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8fecb810) out of 5 stars Top notch job 14 April 2003
By T Galazka - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was actually surprised - the only notion I'd had before of Mr. Cassutt's work was that he co-edited a so-so SF anthology "Sacred Visions" (his story was okay, but not the best one in the collection), and here he hits me with an awesome book. Truly - hats off, stand up and applaud. And it wasn't only that the story he presented was an engrossing, detailed and pleasing one - though this is a model thriller per se and should serve as a yardstick for the guys who think they can write. No, I was impressed by something else, something that an American author doesn't pull off all that often. The reality of being Russian in those days. Rybko is so real I was strongly tempted to believe in his existence, warts and all. At once fairly intelligent and helpless in coping with Soviet multi-layered reality, with plots within plots and official smokescreens at every step, with family secrets even more sinister, he just pulled me into the book and didn't let go until the last page. A pity there's no six-star award...
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8fecb864) out of 5 stars Gripping Space Thriller 9 Feb. 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Michael Cassutt, who penned an earlier murder mystery set within the NASA family (Missing Man), does an excellent job of pulling the reader into the shadowy world of the Russian space program. He adds verisimilitude to the story by using historical figures (Yuri Gagarin, etc.) as central characters (he's obviously done his homework) but keeps the plotting fast-paced. His background in TV/movies (Max Headroom among others) serves him well in evoking visual images through the written word. Some might wonder if today's reader wants to learn more about dead Soviet space pioneers, but then you could've said the same about Apollo 13.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x908354a4) out of 5 stars Sensational new techno-thriller 15 Mar. 2001
By Colin Burgess - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I thought that Cassutt's "Missing Man" was a superb book, but his latest venture into the mysterious and covert world of cosmonautics is simply without peer. I've been following spaceflight history for many years now, and I can see how the author (a renowned authority on the subject) has interwoven a fictional thriller story into the largely-unrevealed world of the Russian space program of the 1960's. Without spoiling the plot, the central focus is on the alleged murder of Russia's Sergei Korolev, the real-life "Chief Designer" of that nation's space program, whose reluctant anonymity only came to an end with his death on an operating table. Without him at the helm, Russia's space program fell apart, and America reached the Moon first. Because it is based very much on fact, this book is quite astonishing reading, and it is very obvious that Cassutt has done some deep and extensive research in putting together his book. There are many surprises stitched into the story, and it has proved to be a real page-turner for me. One of the best techno-thrillers for many years, in my humble opinion.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8fecbaec) out of 5 stars Modern Historic Fiction of the Russian Space program 28 April 2001
By Edward Alexander Gerster - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I often wonder why it seems I am reading a different book from other reviewers. Several have called this a mystery of what really happened to cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, but that is a plotline in this story that does not arrive until 2/3 of the way through the story... and is truly only a minor part of this techno-thriller. The history of the Russian space program is absolutely fascinating and dictates both the plot and setting. It is a wonderfully brisk read that kept me entertained and looking for further information in the area of the history of space exploration. Highly recommended.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8fecbc6c) out of 5 stars Fascinating and engrossing. 29 Dec. 2007
By AReader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I loved this book not only for its great pacing and story, but for the insight into the Soviet space program - some great insider stories that probably could never have been told with the real names - interesting both as a novel and as almost-history...
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