Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £6.64

Save £2.35 (26%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Red or Dead by [Peace, David]
Kindle App Ad

Red or Dead Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 216 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£6.64

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

Red Or Dead is a masterpiece. David Peace already has a considerable reputation but this massive, painstaking account of the career of Bill Shankly towers above his previous work. (Frank Cottrell Boyce Observer)

The writing is honed, sculpted, poetic ... Peace has built what is a worthy monument to a figure light years removed from the megabucks and hype of today's football. It doesn't matter if you don't follow the game, this is also a profound investigation of the tension between aspiration and the constraints of time, the very essence of the human condition (Ben Felsenberg Metro)

I want to go out and knock on doors like a Jehovah's Witness and read this book to people. (Peter Hooton Observer)

An epic that has more in common with Beowulf or The Iliad than with the conventional sports novel. (Richard Lloyd Parry The Times)

Both epic in scale and meticulous in its attention to detail. (Dan Davies Esquire)

Peace ... again proves himself to be magnificently single-minded and unbiddable, and has recognised in Shankly another brilliant and pioneering obsessive of his profession. (Mark Lawson The Guardian)

Book Description

From David Peace - the bestselling author of The Damned Utd - comes Red or Dead, the story of Bill Shankly, the first truly great football manager of the modern age.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2704 KB
  • Print Length: 738 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Signed ed edition (30 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CR6MNKU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 216 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #134,630 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By MisterHobgoblin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Oct. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Red Or Dead is a long, complex and powerful novel.

In his previous works, David Peace has addressed themes of the British class system, office management, corruption and politics. His novels have tended to focus on Yorkshire, albeit with two set in post-war Japan. In Red Or Dead, David Peace departs from his usual hunting ground to narrate the career of a Scotsman managing Liverpool Football Club.

Peace has a distinctive style. He focuses on repetition and lists. Indeed, the first three words of Red Or Dead are: "repetition, repetition, repetition". This is used to build narrative up into a kind of chant, a kind of mantra. In this novel, following 15 seasons of football matches (that's 630 matches in the league, plus cup games, every single one mentioned), the repetition illustrates the sheer monotony of football. Match after match after match, season after season after season. Every game the same as the one before, every season the same as the one before. Yet, still the game fascinates Bill Shankly, still it fascinates the fans. And despite knowing the outcomes in advance, it fascinates the reader. This hypnotic repetition of venues, attendances, team line ups, goal scorers, position in the league table. It draws the reader in whilst, at the same time, conveying the grinding chore of it all. And sometimes there will be a happy ending at the end of the season. But, as often as not, there is disappointment and the need to start all over again next year.

David Peace does not use "he" and "she". Characters are named, every time. Whether at Anfield Stadium or at his home on West Derby Road, we find Bill doing this and Bill doing that, obsessively, over and over again. The language is simple to the point of being monosyllabic.
Read more ›
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
On the bus. Under grey skies. On the bus, under grey skies, Jonathan picks up the book. Jonathan opens the book. Jonathan starts reading the book. Jonathan finishes one page of the book. Jonathan starts the next page of the book. Jonathan finishes that page of the book. Jonathan turns over the next page of the book. And Liverpool win one-nil, at home, at Anfield.

There's no denying that David Peace, the author of GB84, the Red Riding Quartet, and the Damned United, has a unique writing style.
Poetic, brutal, distinctively Northern.
And repetitive.
No review of Peace can fail to mention the part repetition plays in his writing.
Repetition, repetition, repetition.
Repetition is as important to Peace himself as it is to his character of Bill Shankly, the legendary former manager of Liverpool Football Club. Whether it's scouring the oven, cleaning the car, or putting his players through their paces in training, Shankly is a man for whom the word thorough could have been coined.
His philosophy was that if you work hard, and prepare properly, you will get your rewards on the pitch.
But when there are no more training sessions to run, and no more matches to prepare for, what does such a man do then?

In short, flounder. The second half of the book, which deals with Shankly's retirement, is a tough read, as he tries desperately to stay active, vital, and relevant.
The emptiness of his life, and the loneliness he suffers as a result, are heartbreaking to witness.
What the book emphasizes is the importance of a hinterland, a life beyond work, but such things were alien to many men of Shankly's generation and background.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Chris bought the book. In the cold and in the night. Chris read page one. Chris read page two. In the cold and in the night. Chris read page three. Chris read page four. In the cold and in the night. Chris got tired. Tired of the device. The device of repetition. In the cold and in the night. The device. Repetition.

Chris read page ninety-eight. In the cold and in the night. Chris put down the book. The book. Down. Chris put it down. The book.
4 Comments 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is not a book about Bill Shankly, the football manager, at home, at Anfield. At home or at Anfield. Bill the manager, the football manager. Of Liverpool. Of Liverpool at Anfield. Managed at Anfield, by Bill. Bill Shankly, the football manager. The football manager of Liverpool,at Anfield. This is a book about a man who writes. A writer who is a man. A man who writes books. A man who writes books with words. A man who writes books with words and sentences. A man who is a writer who writes books with words. A man who is a writer who is a man who is a writer who writes books with words and sentences. A man who is a writer who is a man who is a writer who writes books with words and sentences and then writes the same words and the same sentences. The same words and sentences in the same book by a man who is a writer who writes books. With the same words. With the same words and the same sentences. Over and over again. Over and over and over again. Over and over and over and over again. The man writes the book with the same words and sentences. The man who is a writer. And then he washes the dishes. The dishes, in his house. In his house, at home.
40 Comments 201 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover